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I've been a huge MotoGP fan over the years. The new rules are just taking the fun out of it, though, and I've started watching WSBK.

I've got to say; What an AWESOME series. More bikes, great riders, and closer battles. To top it all off, WSBK laptimes are creeping up really close to MotoGP laptimes. Only a few seconds difference here and there. Single tire rules, 800cc limit, etc. are just going to kill GP, imho. Why do they want to keep reducing speeds? It isn't like people were killing themselves left and right on the racetrack!?
 

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I've been a huge MotoGP fan over the years. The new rules are just taking the fun out of it, though, and I've started watching WSBK.

I've got to say; What an AWESOME series. More bikes, great riders, and closer battles. To top it all off, WSBK laptimes are creeping up really close to MotoGP laptimes. Only a few seconds difference here and there. Single tire rules, 800cc limit, etc. are just going to kill GP, imho. Why do they want to keep reducing speeds? It isn't like people were killing themselves left and right on the racetrack!?
First, the single tire rule SAVED world SBK. Manufacturers had left hand over fist. Spec tires brought the field closer (although it made the lap time some 4 seconds slower for a number of years). Right now the GP series is just starting to work out their spec tires. You have a lot of guys who know the tires and a lot of guys who have never ridden them, that will create a lap time disparity. Right now, the 800's are running faster lap times than the 990cc GP bikes. Unfortunately the costs are what are really making the series very difficult for a lot of people. There are NO privateer teams left in the series simply because there are no competitive engines available and the cost of developing one AND staying on top of development are astronomical. As it stands, MotoGP is in danger of pricing itself out of business, because a couple of OEM's wanted to use the series to develop four-strokes. Personally I would love to see the GP series go to a displacement limited open series. Imagine 800cc's in whatever configuration you think is best. You would have 800cc four strokes, 800cc two-strokes, 800cc rotaries, maybe even 800cc diesels all battling against each other. Privateer teams could run 800cc two-strokes to develop the power at lower cost than the four strokes at the expense of tractability, while the factory teams could run the four strokes for R&D purposes and the rotary could attract unusual players like Mazda.
As far as excitement goes, I think part of the excitement comes from the commentators, try watching the superbike races with the sound off and you will see what I mean (enthusiasm is contagious). Another thing that SBK has going for it is the two race format which kind of gives you a replay and a second chance for an exciting race. I have seen some very good races in both GP's and Superbikes and I have seen some very processional races in both series as well. Unfortunately with GP's it is an all or nothing deal. No second chances to get it right. That in itself is exciting, and knowing the guys up front have hit the set-up right and wont have another shot at it.
I remember not too long ago, the GP's where strong (right after the switch to four-strokes) and the SBK series was on the verge of collapse. Ducati was the only factory team left racing privateers and "no-names", while MotoGP was bringing in new teams such as Kawasaki and Ducati. Excitement has waxed and waned in each series and motogp will find it's footing. But don't forget, the fastest riders on the fastest bikes are still GP's. I'm pretty sure guys like Haga, Bayliss and the rest of the world SBK crew will attest to that.
 

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I really enjoy both series. My main gripe is the 200cc advantage to Ducati in WSBK. That just ain't right. Go Ben!
Looking forward to the 600cc four strokes replacing the 250cc two strokes in the 2010 Motogp series.
 

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Funny, after Le Mans we have a series where the top three are seperated by one point and the top four by nine points.In WSBK there is what a 60 point gap between 1st and second? (I havent watched race 2 yet).
 

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If it wasn't for bad luck, Spies wouldn't have any luck at all. First, he runs out of gas in the last turn and then his bike just quits when leading another race. Not to mention a couple of crashes when leading other races. No points in either of the 4 races. That's racing.
 

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You know what's more exciting than WSBK still? World Supersport - incredible close battles. And then there is the absolute pinnacle of motorcycle racing - 250 GP racing. Take no prisoners racing until the finish line, simply awesome!!!
Shame it's going away.
 

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You know what's more exciting than WSBK still? World Supersport - incredible close battles. And then there is the absolute pinnacle of motorcycle racing - 250 GP racing. Take no prisoners racing until the finish line, simply awesome!!!
Shame it's going away.



It is a shame. And to Honda no less.....:lightning
 

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I really enjoy both series. My main gripe is the 200cc advantage to Ducati in WSBK. That just ain't right. Go Ben!
Spies has won every superpole to date and would probably be winning the championship except for some mechanicals and mental errors. And that's a guy who has never even SEEN some of those tracks before. So much for Ducati's *advantage*.


Looking forward to the 600cc four strokes replacing the 250cc two strokes in the 2010 Motogp series.
Unbelievable.
 

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You know what's more exciting than WSBK still? World Supersport - incredible close battles. And then there is the absolute pinnacle of motorcycle racing - 250 GP racing. Take no prisoners racing until the finish line, simply awesome!!!
Shame it's going away.
Indeed. And the guys who rule MotoGP were all 125 and 250cc terrors while the guys who came from 4-strokes aren't even in the hunt.
 

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First, the single tire rule SAVED world SBK.

LOL. (Do you get anything correct about racing? Ever???)

Overall financial prudence and luck - not cheaper tires - saved WSB. Hell, MotoGP's astronomical salaries probably do more to *save* WSB than anything WSB did. Bayliss's salary as WSB champ was said to be about one TENTH of Rossi's, which is somewhere around 25 - 30M Euros. MotoGP teams are forced to hire overpaid, underperforming riders to fill the grid while WSB gets GP cast-offs and GP hopefuls for a fraction of the price.

And there is the matter of production vs prototype racing. WSB is so affordable, relatively speaking, that privateer teams can fill the grid to bursting - and they run two races per weekend. GP now rations motors and puts limits on maintenance. They've even dropped one practice session while WSB has ADDED two SuperPole sessions to the show. Costs are killing MotoGP but they're not tire costs.
 

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LOL. (Do you get anything correct about racing? Ever???)

Overall financial prudence and luck - not cheaper tires - saved WSB. Hell, MotoGP's astronomical salaries probably do more to *save* WSB than anything WSB did. Bayliss's salary as WSB champ was said to be about one TENTH of Rossi's, which is somewhere around 25 - 30M Euros. MotoGP teams are forced to hire overpaid, underperforming riders to fill the grid while WSB gets GP cast-offs and GP hopefuls for a fraction of the price.

And there is the matter of production vs prototype racing. WSB is so affordable, relatively speaking, that privateer teams can fill the grid to bursting - and they run two races per weekend. GP now rations motors and puts limits on maintenance. They've even dropped one practice session while WSB has ADDED two SuperPole sessions to the show. Costs are killing MotoGP but they're not tire costs.
I guess you are the authority on racing so I should just defer to your opinion to be correct.

The single tire rule saved world superbikes by bringing the privateer teams closer to the factory teams in terms of competitiveness. All the factory teams had LEFT the series except Ducati leaving the series as a shell of its former self. When WSBK went to a single tire rule the racing became much closer and began drawing more of an audience which resulted in regained factory interest from the Japanese brands. Honda, Suzuki, Yamaha and Kawasaki all returned to the grid with factory suported, but non-factory teams. The competitiveness of the series and the attention it was drawing would eventually also attract BMW as a new entrant to superbikes and Aprilia to return to the series after it's failed foray into MotoGP.

I wouldn't kid myself about the costs of racing world superbikes. Sure it may be cheaper than running a prototype bike but the costs are still very high. Don't forget Ducati cited costs for the reason for the 1200cc displacement change. But the ROI for exposure is probably much higher in world superbike, but the ROI in development is much higher in GP's.
 

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I guess not.
Well since we are speculating and only talking about opinions, where there isn't a right or wrong, you are entitled to be right (in your own opinion of course).

Funny, I got a PM a while back about you. I just went back and read it. Some funny shit there. Remind me to share it with you some time ;)
 

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Racing is closer under the spec tire rule, huh? Bayliss ran away with the championship last year and barring a major misfortune on Haga's part no one other than Fabrizio and Spies have so much as a chance at the title.
 

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The single tyre rule came into WSB because in 2003 the factory Ducatis of Hodgson & Xaus had very special Michelins which one couldn't buy, even if one had the money!!! Everyone else on Dunlops had no chance, even if their bike was good enough. Even though the Japanese factories left en masse to help finance their fledgling MotoGP projects the Flammini's knew they would return- if they wanted to raise the profile of their 1000cc sportsbikes, they had to be in WSB !(while BSB & AMA are both important, they are not WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS!) Now we have SEVEN manufacturers entered, with KTM hopefully due in 2010 (wouldn't it be fantastic to see MV & say, Benelli there also?). MotoGP are now trying to save money by cutting mileage & limting riders to one bike but the problem is the R&D costs, & they are too late. In the end, MotoGP promotes riders & brand profile, but WSB sells bikes- Win on sunday, sell on monday !!!
 
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