MV Agusta Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am going to stick my neck out and lay bare my total ignorance, but be gentle, my excuse is that my previous bikes have been air/oil-cooled...

My garage is not heated or particularly well-insulated. With the thermometer dropping close to 0 deg C, and likely to go well into the negative this winter, I am growing concerned about detrimental effects to the bike, particularly the cooling circuits.

I would expect that a bare minimum of anti-freeze is added from factory, does anyone have any numbers? What do usually do for winter conservation? Cryogenically preserve it with huge dose of anti-freeze, then replace for next season?

The obvious solution which will inevitably pop up is ‘bring her indoors’. While this IS physically possible, I’d like to avoid it as there will be a lot of tinkering over the winter and will be a hard sell to the missus!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,334 Posts
The anti-freeze installed at the factory is a 50/50 mix of ethylene glycol and water. This protects your engine down to -34C (-30F)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
YAY Concrete numbers - thanking you muchly!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,886 Posts
Probably been beaten to death but you could pull the battery and keep it on a tender at home. You wouldn't want to start the bike in the dead of winter anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Oh yes, will definitely have the batt on a tender, and mos def fire her up during the winter.. just to tearn things over, listen to the new exhaust, sniff the fumes.. you know...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Tearn? Jeez where did that come from? I think I meant ‘turn’!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,334 Posts
Oh yes, will definitely have the batt on a tender, and mos def fire her up during the winter.. just to tearn things over, listen to the new exhaust, sniff the fumes.. you know...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


The tender is a good idea, randomly firing up the beast is not.


Unless the engine is driven up to normal operating temperature for a while, the moisture generated will not be driven out of the system and that might cause problems. Once laid up for the season, just let it sit on the tender until you are ready for the next ride.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,886 Posts
What Chuck said. Just start it up when its warm weather again. Your battery will be happier in your house, where it'll be warm and constant temp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Hmm... agree on running it up to op temp, but I hadn’t heard about this being a problem! What about the nuts whom fly around on their enduros, or even commute on big adv bikes with studded tires throughout the winter in this neck of the woods? Not to mention a myriad of other combustion engine-propelled stuff that runs up to high temps, is parked in freezing temps, then started again, at various intervals throughout winter?

I’m not suggesting you’re wrong, but would like to be educated on what the sensitivities are.

Cheers
Jon


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,334 Posts
@Eljono: You evidently didn't listen to what you read...see my signature....

I said that if you are going to get it up to NORMAL Operating TEMPERATURE for several minutes...implying at normal loading conditions...then all is well. (Just like all those IC engines running all winter)

But, if you just fire it up and shut it down for the sake of hearing it run and smelling the exhaust, then you aren't doing yourself any favors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
526 Posts
I also put some PUTOLINE FUEL STABILIZER in if I'm not using for a few months - was recommended by a dealer


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Hi again Chuck,

No worries - and I like your quote, although I think I have the honour of not articulating myself or being understood as intended :D

With previous, albeit more agricultural-engined bikes, I've periodically fired them up during the winter. I've let them idle and run them softly up to op-temp, not just randomly for the pleasure of listening to the music and bathing in fumes to tide me over until spring, but to provide their internals with a nice, hot oil bath during their 5-6 month long hibernation.

I was looking for any 'MV\B3 specific' reasons why I should not do so - following on from my initial posting of my ignorance with regards to factory-spec'ed coolant and growing sense that these bikes can be divas...


Cheers,
J
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,500 Posts
?

Eljono;
Don't start the bikes during the winter layover
Remove the battery and put it on a tender
Add fuel stabilizer and run the motor to circulate the stabilizer

:wink2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for all your comments!

The case for relocating to a warmer climate continues to grow..... :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
How about emptying the fuel from the tank completely and even run the engine until it runs out of fuel?

Put the battery on a tender and forget about starting the bike until the weather permits you to ride it.

C.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,629 Posts
My Turismo is now installed in my sisters barn for winter as home is no longer home (long story). Move into rental property tomorrow. Was thinking solar powered LiPo battery bank with inverter running the optimate but removing the battery seems a far more sensible, and cheaper (i.e. free), option. My only concern is that the backup batteries on both alarm and tracker will die a death over the four or so months of hibernation.

As I still have the original BS battery as well as the Antigravity one then maybe a two week cycle of charge and swap might be prudent. Opinions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
having just put my bike into hibernation i have drained the tank, disconnected battery, taken the spu of bike, also the ecu
the headlamp, and clocks this is on my 910s over the last few years it has been cold and wet in scotland and dampness is the killer for electrical parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Not sure about the draining bit! Isn’t that and invite to condensation, vs filling it to the brim?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,629 Posts
Not sure about the draining bit! Isn’t that and invite to condensation, vs filling it to the brim?
I agree. My preference would be to brim it with non or lowest available ethanol fuel having already poured some Stabil into the tank, ride it home and park it up.

Though with plastic tanks maybe not so relevant as with steel. The ethanol in modern fuel can have detrimental effects on plastic so maybe draining is the way to go.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top