MV Agusta Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,291 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Motor competent here. I've built a couple Honda motors, some turbo, some nitrous based, mostly NA...cars obviously. Rebuilt an Aircooled VW motor...

I was just curious on the MV motor. Specifically, the valve checks/adjustments. Are there any special tools needed to do this? I only found a yoke and rear hub/nut when I was searching for MV specific tools. How different is the radial valve set-up from typical valves in terms of actually servicing them?

Theoretically speaking, I should be able to take it to any Honda dealer if I'm not up to the task/lack the tools. The radial valve configuration in production motorcycles has been in use since at least 1983 by Honda, as the XR 350. The XR650L has radial valves as well. They were badged RFVCC (Radial Four Valve Combustion Chamber)....hmm...

The reason asking is, the closest MV dealer is 5.5 hours away...either Charlotte North Carolina, or Ft. Lauderdale/Miami. Eitherway, I'm smack dab in the middle. If the only reason to take it to an MV dealer is to not void the warranty, I could see it being worth a drive, but in my case, I'm not under warranty. And if infact the MV radial valving is identical to the radial valving set-up on the Hondas...I should be good to go at a very reputable Honda dealer. Even if the most trusted mechanic is an hour or two away...it's a far cry from 5.5-7 hours ONE way....

Thanks in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,937 Posts
It's a bucket in shim arrangement so you don't need any special tools. Checks are extremely easy. I've never had to make an adjustment so although other's have done it and report it very straightforward I don't have first hand experience with this myself.

The only special tool is the valve press. I've had quite a bit of conversation about it due to a motor build at a shop down in Austin at this link:

http://www.mototek.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=751&perpage=15&pagenumber=1

with the motor build split off onto this page now:

http://www.mototek.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=888


In that first link you can find info on the valve tool including some links I put to pictures.

It could be the honda mechanics know of a way to deal with the valve angles on the MV's radial layout but as far as I know it takes the factory tool for a proper press at the proper angle. Not sure you'd ever have to deal with all that but I suppose if you ever did a complete rebuild. I'll go out on a limb here and suggest that most likely you won't ever need it :)

This bike is engineered not only for riding but also for maintenance. Something you'll start to enjoy the more time you spend on it. He's done an incredible job that Goggi guy :king:

Here is the press:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
I do all my own maintenance, since I don't have time to travel all the way to Miami, drop the bike off, drive back home, then go pick it back up the next day.

It would be nice to own a CO meter though. :errr:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,473 Posts
james,

do you do the gas analysis only in neutral?
or do you do it with the engine under load? i would have thought the only way to get a meaningful analysis is on the dyno...

btw, i do my own engine work too. the f4 has a shim-under-bucket design, which is just like almost all the other in-line 4 cylinder sportbikes.

alex
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,937 Posts
altoon said:
james,

do you do the gas analysis only in neutral?
or do you do it with the engine under load? i would have thought the only way to get a meaningful analysis is on the dyno...

btw, i do my own engine work too. the f4 has a shim-under-bucket design, which is just like almost all the other in-line 4 cylinder sportbikes.

alex

Hi Alex, I do it at the specified conditions per manual. The bike will let you know when it is right or it is wrong with feel at the throttle.
I can't agree the only meaningful analysis is on the dyno but I'm sure airfuel and some dyno operators will have something to say about that :) I have a number of miles on my own co% tuning and have played around quite a lot within a safe range so am happy with the way the factory specifies. Riding powercomander corrected bikes confirms IMO.

Eh, bucket-in-shim / shim-in-bucket - nice lesdyxic moment there :laughing:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,473 Posts
maybe i should go RTFM! lol.
i'll do that tonight.

need to put the powercommander i have in there. guess i'm having just too damn much fun riding the thing to worry about it too much.

thanks for the info.

alex
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,937 Posts
altoon said:
maybe i should go RTFM! lol.
i'll do that tonight.

need to put the powercommander i have in there. guess i'm having just too damn much fun riding the thing to worry about it too much.

thanks for the info.

alex
Another mark from airfuel I'm sure but I'm back to a 0 map on my PCIII and just more regular TB balances and CO trims for the smoothest yet. I care about mid range and smooth throttle so no idea what this does to my 'numbers'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,291 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Well, I found an MV mechanic...he's a 60 year old guy, who's Shop Manager at the Yamaha dealer. Go figure. He owns multiple vintage italian bikes, one of which is an MV 750S....

But he said he's only work on it if cleared by the store manager, who obviously gave him the go ahead. I bring parts to do the work(gaskets, filters,etc), and they'll charge me thier typical labor rate. Which is pretty cool I guess, considering it may be cheaper than MV labor rates :laughing: . The store managers stipulation was that I bring a shop manual, even though the guy said he could tear down the bike and rebuild it blindfolded, it pretty much for liability/"just in case"...how do I get my hands on one of those? Cost?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,292 Posts
James,

How's your gas mileage?
The reason I ask is that many drivability problems can be cured with lots of gas being thrown at the engine......(like many MV's I have seen)........but this causes other problems I'll address.

You may be one of the lucky ones with a bike that runs great with just the right trimming of the fuel, your "ass" dyno might be spot on! :laughing:

The dyno is a great tool for many things, diagnosis, fixing fueling problems or just a fun way to "see what she'll do".

I have had many bikes on the dyno that ran just about perfect and I send them on their way with peace of mind that the bike is running great. Other times though, bikes can be either dangerously lean (low power output, extreme heat buildup and the possibility of burned exhaust valves) or extremely rich (low gas mileage, fouling of plugs, washing down of cylinder walls with diluted oil) this just causes your engine to wear out faster than usual. Sometimes you get a combination of the two!

Setting base CO levels is the first step to getting a bike to run right, but this may not be enough in some cases as the fuel curve cannot be changed, just lowered or raised. I have seen such bike to bike differences that only a good dyno session with an airfuel (get it!) monitor can show how a bike is running at all throttle positions, loads and speeds. :conveyer:

Remember, aftermarket devices that change fueling like chips, TFI boxes, race tuners, Power Commanders etc are not for everyone. They are there to fix problems that exist from the factory or from changing your bike from stock.Some people need them, many don't. Sorry for running on :blah: :blah:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,937 Posts
Hi,

When I first got my analyzer I found that the shop was running my bike by feel and had it around 7% / 11.8-9 a/f! I started at factory recommended 3.5% and moved up to my current 4.5%, 12.82 a/f over time. My twisties riding mileage went from about 130 miles per tank up to about 145. I have had some very long, far and fast nights when travelling and got less than 100miles per tank but that's far from the norm (dyno tuned aprilia factory I was riding with was getting 65-70miles per tank at the same time :laughing: ).

Agreed on all points, just want to relay what has worked for me over the long term..especially with regard to throttle feel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,291 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Damn.....I only get 95-100 miles before the gas light pops up, regardless of how agressive or passive I drive.....my motor is completely stock with the exception of the Arrow Mid-Pipe....I guess it's dyno time eh?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,937 Posts
Your Brutale vs my F4 :) Known issue with Brute's but yes, likely dyno time if that's a concern.



oicdn said:
Damn.....I only get 95-100 miles before the gas light pops up, regardless of how agressive or passive I drive.....my motor is completely stock with the exception of the Arrow Mid-Pipe....I guess it's dyno time eh?
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top