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Discussion Starter #1
Hi eveyone, this is my first post with this nick (couldn't get my previous password, so had to reregister).

I've been tracking or hobby racing an RSV Factory for 8 years now. I didn't plan to replace the Ape but my 2 year old daughter got me hooked on bikes again. She is obsessed with bikes and wants to watch bike videos on youtube instead of listening to tales. :) So, I've got the bug and I am looking for somehting exciting to replace the RSV with.

My riding: I go on a one-week tour in the Italian Alps every year (just the twisties, no motorway), but other than that only a few track days or amature races. So, I figured I want a bike that gives me more than just good laptimes. Well, you must be familiar with this feeling after all, riding Mvs.

I have a budget of around 10k euros. The obvious choice would be a daytona 675r but it is out of my price range and I'd rather stick with Italian bikes (used to have a 999s and an xtra raptor before).
So, my short list looks the following:
f3 675, f4 spr, ducati 749r.

I have a weak spot for the SPR. It may not be the best choice but I can hardly get it out of my head. I could also say the same about the Duc (unfortunately I cannot afford both). The f3 675 might be a good idea, though I am not a big fan of electronic trickery. I do no want to break lap records, just want to ride in a good rythm on a bike that ticks the right boxes.

I suppose - mainly due to its weight - the f3 would be the best for the track action, but at the end of the day I would be more happy to turn back and take a last glance at an SPR or a 749r.

Still, I am curious how the f3 compares to an SPR or an f4 750 (I know that not many owners track their SPRs) on the track? I have run a few searches but I might have missed some aspects.

Thanks and sorry for the long post.
Adam
 

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Hello Adam, and Welcome to this crazy forum. There are several members here who track the SPR. They will chime in soon. The 750 is probably the right bike if you enjoy shorter tracks with technical turns. The 1000 series bikes (998) have a lot of motor. Of course the earlier generation bikes are a bit piggish for weight, some say, and the 675 is a smaller format. So, seeing as you come from the Planet of the "Apes"...you might like the liter bike better. This being an MV forum, you will get unexpected opinions on all the listed bikes as people here have experience with them all.

Enjoy the forum, relate to the characters you will discover here...and get any MV. You will enjoy it one way or the other.

Oh, and tell you daughter she's a smart girl!
 

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My SPR is a track bike......but all the standard body parts are replaced with track parts.

It is all I need, personally, but I'm not the young man I was 40 years ago when I was a lot more competitive.

That said, I wish I still had my old SV650 track bike.....so much fun and so inexpensive to run (and crash occasionally).
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I am 38, so it is not about competitiveness for me, just pure fun.

The problem with the RSV - which is properly setup for the track - is that even in the alps it is a huge overkill. If I wanted to approach its limits or rather 70 % of it , I would have to go so fast that I'd never do on public roads. So the focus is on track performance.

A liter bike is out of question. I know my limits and a liter bike - let alone an f4 - is too much for my skills and commitment - as it is for the 90% of people.

If I could work it out, I would - of course - put race fairings on the SPR, as well as Brembo superlights for the track and a full system.

The Duc would be easier, as most of them come with everything already installed on mounted.
 

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I wouldn't rule out the 749R. I had a stock 749. They are an absolute blast on the track. I can only image how a track prepped R would be.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I haven't.

Though, I also forgot to ask, if the fueling issues on the early 2012 f3s have been sorted? I mean, if a buy an ealy model that should already have the latest software installed. Am I right?
 

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Hey mate.

Its easy. If you can find a SPR then buy it. It is an awesome machine. My SPR i use to commute on it to and from work rain hail or shine. Never let me down. On the track its a weapon. It comes with the rg3 system and sprockets. Yeah u might want to change the wheels and possibly the brakes. I boiled my brakes at tge track first time. It doesnt have a slipper clutch either but thats ok. I love that bike. Never will sell it. Still gets people looking at it when i pull up. You will absolutley love it.

Fromwhat i can tell. Your heart is with a SPR. Go with it. You wont be dissapointed my friend. Goodluck and welcome.


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When the 749R was released it was the closest thing Ducati had made relative to its race bikes (World Supersport 749R) until then. It had features used by the race bike that even the 999R did not have relative to the WSBK 999R. No doubt an SPR would be a nice choice too, but the 749R was a very special bike.

Not sure where you're located but there might be Ducati 848 and even some '07 1098 bikes in that price range.
 

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I own two SPRs, one track bike and one street bike. The funny thing about MVs in my opinion, is the harder you ride them the better they are. So if you only do a one week tour in the Alps and a few track days, you aren't going to realized the potential of the SPR and you will be frustrated at the ease with which people on lesser machines pass you. Also if you are used to a big twin, riding a four cylinder at 10,000 rpm takes a lot of getting used to. The throttle is mighty sensitive at that range.

Parts for MVs aren't cheap. If you do a few track days a year, your bound to drop it from time to time.

I think you would have a lot more fun and have more money for parts and track days if you tracked a 748, 749 or 998 (I had a salvage title 998 Bostrom which I should not have sold).

I have no experience with the 675 so I have no opinion about that.
 

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The F3 is a blast on the track, very easy to go fast on, I imagine the 800 would be more suited to longer tracks, but the 675 I rode was great. Fuelling is no longer a issue with constant mapping updates behind us now.
If I had a SPR, I would preserve it for street riding, those are becoming very rare.
There's heaps of suspension, fairing and exhaust options available for the F3's, so not hard to trailer to suit, they are Aldo very easy to work on.
 

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+1 for the 675. Has plenty of torque and revs to match. I was surprised when I rode it how well it delivered power when compared to my 996 that I was riding at the time. Track ready with minimum prep.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I have an old porsche which is the same as Cag describes the SPR. The faster you drive it the more rewarding it becomes.

The reason I don't ride jap bikes is that there is no learning curve. I have ridden lots of jap bikes on the track and I was sometimes faster on them then on my ape. Nevertheless, I still prefer the feedback and feeling I get from Italian bikes. I am not a pro, but fairly good for an amature, so I am not afraid of getting frustrated by the SPR.

As for getting passed by riders on lesser machines: I was once on a personal best lap when someone on a 600rr in street livery and road tyres left me standing in one of my favorite section of the Hungaroring in Budapest. I can tell you, it was frustrating, but when the guy took his helmet off I saw that he was Talmacsi, a 125cc world champion. A pro or a real good rider can pass anyone practically on a roller if they so desire.

The 999S taught me a lot about riding. You had to ride it with finesse, and if you were not focusing a 100% on riding it it made you feel your lack of attention or mistakes at once. In comparison, the RSV is more forgiving.

The problem with the spr is that it is hard to find one. The 749r is an easier purchase and there are qutie a few f3s for sale. Heart says spr, brain says f3.
 

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Seeing your garage or it must rather be a hangar, I take this for an unbiased advice.
None of your choices would be bad; and I'm always biased, but only for objective fact instead of subjective opinion. :yo:

The 749R has all the right stuff without the stonk of the 999, which is what you're after, I'd think.

All years are rare, but don't get an '04. The carbon tail section makes them more desirable to collectors and a bit more money. Plus, you evidently don't need the collectable status.
 

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I think your mind is already made up my friend you dont need us to re confirm it for ypu. You also have to love your purchase so that would tell you go with your heart. But now try find one lol


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Discussion Starter #17
How about an Sr? Just in case, I couldn't find an spr. I know the difference in specs, but can you actually feel the difference between the two bikes' suspensions on the track?
Right now it seems that I'll go for the duc. Plan B the f3 and if I get a lucky break and a reasonably priced spr comes along for sale, I might just jump on it.
 
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