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Just a thought on a slow day.
If the Japanese had not decided to build bikes, what would we be riding today?
I started on all types of crap bikes and dreamed of an in line four that was reliable, did not vibrate itself to death, leak oil, powerful, good electrics. Etc. etc. And then came the CB 750 and my world took a huge step forward.
Your thoughts??
 

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Personally I like Japanese motorcycles. I still have my 2002 R1.
As for what would we be riding without them? I like to think we would all be riding Brittens.
 

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Just a thought on a slow day.
If the Japanese had not decided to build bikes, what would we be riding today?
I started on all types of crap bikes and dreamed of an in line four that was reliable, did not vibrate itself to death, leak oil, powerful, good electrics. Etc. etc. And then came the CB 750 and my world took a huge step forward.
Your thoughts??
Yes that was indeed a ground breaking bike. I think any collection that wishes to be representatove of true motorcycling histroy needs a CB 750 Four in it.

Personally I like Japanese motorcycles. I still have my 2002 R1.
As for what would we be riding without them? I like to think we would all be riding Brittens.
I would like to think that too, I would ride one, principaly as a mark of respect to the sheer genius. Yes, I do realise that Johnathon Britten was a Kiwi ;)
 

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The CB750 was the bike that propelled Tamburini into prominence (the first Bimoto used that engine). Tambo himself, in an interview, has credited the CB750 with being the motorcycle that changed everything.
 

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Where would we be without the Europeans ?

For sure the Japanese raised the bar and forced European Manufacturers into bankruptcy or made them trailing the performance of the Japanese forerunners. The low Yen did support the Japanese either at this time.
However the Japanese started with copying European bikes, as Yamaha did with an NSU, or was it DKW, for an example.
 

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I too like Japanese bikes. I've had a fair few of 'em over the years including several varients of CB750. Any history of road motorcycling would surely have to give that bike a chapter or so. It's well known big H beat Kawasaki to the gun and they (Kawasaki) went back to the drawing board and came up with the Z1. All of the 'big 4' have had some great bikes in their line ups over the years. I'd like to think the Brits had their share of good stuff too. Just don't park one on the living room carpet.:shitfan: I think we had a top ten favourite bikes thread some time ago, in fact there may have been more than one (thread that is). As for landmark road bikes, I'd go with the CB750. I couldn't believe it when I first saw one. The only other bikes which have made me stop and stare are the 750 MV's (the original Cascina Costa bikes), the 916 and the F4.
 

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As for landmark road bikes, I'd go with the CB750. I couldn't believe it when I first saw one. The only other bikes which have made me stop and stare are the 750 MV's (the original Cascina Costa bikes), the 916 and the F4.
I'd go with that John and i've owned them all:) The only other bike I might add to that list is a Ducati 900SS,
 

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Of course, what REALLY introduced TWO wheel transport to the masses in 1946?

 

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Where would we be without the Europeans ?

For sure the Japanese raised the bar and forced European Manufacturers into bankruptcy or made them trailing the performance of the Japanese forerunners. The low Yen did support the Japanese either at this time.
However the Japanese started with copying European bikes, as Yamaha did with an NSU, or was it DKW, for an example.
It was Suzuki and the East German MZ...defecting Kurt Degner (spelling?) brought the latest 2-stroke technology with him and Suzuki hired him...:drummer:
 

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The japs certainly moved the biking world forwards, with oil-tight machines, fresh innovations, speed and reliability. I've owned a few and still keep two in the garage. Both are great machines with bulletproof reliability :)

What I find interesting is that their dominant phase is coming to a close now, and it's a cultural thing that's driving it. The Japanese are fairly risk-adverse and won't make huge leaps forward on a regular basis, but Europeans will. It's been interesting to see companies like Triumph, Ducati and BMW going from strength-to-strength, beating japanese companies at their own game. All this means for us is greater competition, more choice and better bikes.

Here's my '75 CB550 (which I made a few modifications to)





That old bike was punchy, well made, simple to work on and a reliable workhorse... not bad for a 30+ yr old machine that had been neglected for years by previous owners.

I wonder if today's bikes will still be made running so easily in 2040?
 

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That is simply very cool!
 

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That certainly looks a lovely job. The original was pig-ugly and not many are still around. I remember Dave Taylor using one as a wheelie machine - I think he had it for free as the previous owner detested it and reckoned there was something wrong with the handling. Good days.
 

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making a whopping 28 horsepower in 2010. Garbage.

:blah:I disagree with your assesment Squidly...28 hp for an upright bike to cruise on is fabulous...especially for Sundays along the shore, or fuel mileage...or if you'd like to begin your riding career on something that won't fire in to into the garage wall at MACH 10.:blah:
 

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I agree nothing wrong with mellow touring or starter bikes, I was more referring to the technology. That thing still has a kick starter and a rear drum brake if u look closely/
 

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I love it for just that!
 

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So do I. We all love a bit of nostalgia as an alternative (rather than as the mainstream/only choice). I'm happier to know there's other options out there though (hence we're all members on here!)
 

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Clever Packaging

I agree nothing wrong with mellow touring or starter bikes, I was more referring to the technology. That thing still has a kick starter and a rear drum brake if u look closely/
I think you'll find the kick starter is more for show than use - It also has an electric starter.

This is clever - built inexpensively in India, they fill a gap for those that want a 'classic' but can't bothered with the love care & attention that a real classic requires. This looks the part but is a modern bike right down the EFI.

Back brake? Wow bikes have back brakes? well I'll be damned :laughing:
 
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