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Discussion Starter #1
Hey,

I have an engine crane, after removing the seat, is it OK to lift the bike using straps around the rear part of the frame?

My theory is since that part of the frame appears to be engineered to have ~200Kg (1+1 models) sitting on it, then it may be strong enough to lift half the bikes weight.

Second, what non typical workshop tools should an F4 owner have?
- Chain link tool
- 55mm 12 point 3/4 drive socket
- ???

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I attach a strap to the frame plates.
If you're going to lift by the sub frame, I do it as close to the front of it as possible.

Supporting the front wheel is going to be an advantage, though not critical.
Thanks for the pictures.

That front wheel stand - how do you get the bike onto it? I'm tossing up whether to weld something together or just go buy one. How much are they and do they have any pivots/linkages?

I've just picked up a Mitchy rear hub and would like to fit it so the initial tools are the big socket for the rear hub. Would you think picking up the frame from the battery area (anodized Silver) would be OK if the fuel tank is still in place, not having access to where you wrapped the straps?

I should give some background - I have most typical car workshop hand tools, eg
- 1/4 & 1/2 drive socket to 32mm, torx, allen key sets, torque wrench, up to 24mm spanners, plastigauge, feeler & dial gauges etc
- Compression tester, timing light, multimeter, CRO etc.
- H and BFH

What other specialist tools may I need in the future that a typical 'car' workshop may not have?

Thanks for all the suggestions and pictures,

Cheers
 

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12" populating tool?
Hahaha, starting small are we :jsm:

Thanks for the pictures.

That front wheel stand - how do you get the bike onto it? I'm tossing up whether to weld something together or just go buy one. How much are they and do they have any pivots/linkages?

I've just picked up a Mitchy rear hub and would like to fit it so the initial tools are the big socket for the rear hub. Would you think picking up the frame from the battery area (anodized Silver) would be OK if the fuel tank is still in place, not having access to where you wrapped the straps?

I should give some background - I have most typical car workshop hand tools, eg
- 1/4 & 1/2 drive socket to 32mm, torx, allen key sets, torque wrench, up to 24mm spanners, plastigauge, feeler & dial gauges etc
- Compression tester, timing light, multimeter, CRO etc.
- H and BFH

What other specialist tools may I need in the future that a typical 'car' workshop may not have?

Thanks for all the suggestions and pictures,

Cheers
You can pick up front wheel stand like that at any bikeshop in AU mate.

You can get the special 55mm wheel nut from any of the forum sponsors, this will make sure the tapered wheel nuts will not get damaged.

The 220nm torque wrench is important, Allen Key sockets and some circlip pliers.
You can get the special pliers for the hose clamp on ebay. Noel can get you the best oil filters at a great price.
There's more, but I have to go, racing is on.
 

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Yep I agree with all the above. I don't have an F4 but like to work on my Brutale..
It depends how far you wanna go and where to stop...
I've a hydraulic lift and set of ratchet straps...real useful.
Eddy..on the other hand gets by...with a baseball bat!:laughing: (and after that., if he ever catches up with me will no doubt have a 'use for it' :laughing::laughing:)
Brian:)
 

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The most useful tool by far for me has been my paddock stand. Being able to lift the entire bike off the ground safely is extremely useful. Alex from GP Racing has a decent deal on these. Makes life SOO much easier.

 

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The most useful tool by far for me has been my paddock stand. Being able to lift the entire bike off the ground safely is extremely useful. Alex from GP Racing has a decent deal on these. Makes life SOO much easier.

+ 10 :smoking:
 

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There are so many 'tools' that I find useful and everybody will have their own 'way of doing things' and as such use the 'tools' that they are most comfortable and familiar with.
Of course an obvious 'requirement' is a good set of metric 'allen keys'...however I almost never use them. I prefer to use a series of 'ratchet screwdrivers' and associated 'bits'.
A 'hub adjusting tool' is also useful ...as is a thin wall 3/8 drive spark plug socket.
You know about the 'tapered' 55mm rear wheel nut tool and torque wrench's.
I've also a large torque multiplier tool very useful for removing the sometimes very tight rear 55mm nut.
Also a set of socket drive adapters (reducers etc)are handy and a little telescopic magnetized nut/screw retriever. I've a few and some with a light at the 'end'.
Donsey said about the 'clic-R' pliers for the OEM hose clamps.
Numerous tools too many to mention and I've taken a few shots of the ones I mentioned and other random shots of some and by no means all of my 'stuff' 'in and around' my garage/workshop which may prove useful..and not strictly necessary..and others just the 'obvious'
Cheers
Brian:)
 

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You can do a hell of a lot with a few special tools ( which aren't so expensive ) in addition to the MV Agusta oe tool kit.

I would say spend some money on a Bursig stand as this is very worthwhile investment enabling you to work on the front and rear of the bike properly. Yes. costly but then so is garage labour and your Bursig stand will have a high resale value if you should ever decide to.

You will read lot about how difficult it is to undo the 55mm wheel nut. Occasionally there may be one rusted fast but in general if you use a rattle gun to crack the left hand thread...and grease the first few threads of the axle on re-assembly then all is fine..Use a torque wrench with an extension through the axle tighten down.

Don't use a standard 55 mm socket as it has straight walls and your bikes wheel nut is tapered. Some guys will say makes no difference but that's up to them. personally I don't like heavy witness marks on the nut where it is bitten by point loading with the wrong socket.
I would suggest a steel socket for hand work and an aluminium socket for a rattle gun. ( Nothing wrong with asking your local tyre bay to crack the nut if it is a tighty ; )


A spring puller ( as first demonstrated to me in Massachusetts by CAG Carl ) is another must have. I didn't even know they existed but boy they make pulling the exhaust springs a cinch !

I used a filter socket to remove the filter too.

I would like a ride height adjuster..I don't have one and I will get one from someone sometime ..

Multimeter is useful as you can check the sensor resistances against the workshop manuals to sort any electrical gremlins..In addition to being able to easily check the alternator and battery function and continuity of switches etc. ..and you don't need a Phd in electrical engineering either !


There is a twelve pin tool for removing/torquing the steering stem bearing carrier...which I think is stuck in my mates Brutale at moment...

joe
 

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Thanks for the pictures.

That front wheel stand - how do you get the bike onto it? I'm tossing up whether to weld something together or just go buy one. How much are they and do they have any pivots/linkages?
Gidday.
That is a Baxley sport chock. As Donsy says, they will be readily available from bike stores.
The front wheel just rolls into a pivoting supporting cradle.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bAaP6G2flnY
 

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Hey,

I have an engine crane, after removing the seat, is it OK to lift the bike using straps around the rear part of the frame?

My theory is since that part of the frame appears to be engineered to have ~200Kg (1+1 models) sitting on it, then it may be strong enough to lift half the bikes weight.

Second, what non typical workshop tools should an F4 owner have?
- Chain link tool
- 55mm 12 point 3/4 drive socket
- ???

Cheers

and...If nobody has mentioned it..Download the manuals from Donsy's sticky at the top of this section...:smoking:
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
I didn't know the nut was tapered, glad I didn't buy a regular 55mm socket...

I quickly searched ebay for the 55mm socket and all are made of aluminium. Reading many posts here suggest you may need a 3/4 breaker bar to crack that nut, my gut instinct says a 1/2 drive hole in an aluminium socket will go from square to a circle with free metal shavings after applying a reasonable amount of torque....
I found one with a 32mm end to attach a socket, to me this makes the most sense:
http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/MV-Agusta-F4-Brutale-750-910-1000-wheel-socket-/350249748766

Could anyone confirm or has anyone damaged the sockets with a 1/2 drive breaker bar?

Thanks for all the suggestions so far! I wasn't aware of the paddock lift style bike stands - I'll check out a few bike shops this weekend if they have one for sale.
Cheers

edit: would this one make more sense since you can put an extension through the rear wheel and torque it the calibrated way when doing it up?
http://www.amazon.com/Agusta-55mm-Socket-Knurled-Tapered/dp/B005CW9PCU

Cheers
 

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There is one more.....

DSCN5436r.jpg

It is in the upper right hand corner of the table....
 
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