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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So as I went to my dealer today I felt a slight cringe of sadness as I see the same exact mv's on the floor unsold that I've seen since last year. It seems that they're just not moving.so I started to wonder why. And I came up with a couple of things.


1st: Price
At the price point that MV is currently selling in the US it's in some pretty stiff competition from mainly Ducati. And to me it seems like MV's should be trying to undercut Ducati in order to compete. Now I understand that they might not be able to since they are just not as big but still.


2: Perceived value

If you look other Italian manufacturers they offer much more in the way of perceived value. Better traction control, ABS, fuel mapping, Higher quality instruments...all of these add up to a customer experience that current MV products can't match. I would love to see MV try to address this but again I can only guess that this comes down to a matter of investment that MV just can't make. But for example at my local dealership they have a nice F3800 and an 899 Panigale. Both compete with each other. Yet just by sitting on the Ducati you feel that you're on a better machine. And that's before you begin to look into the selling points of each bike. And this is not even taking into account Aprilias amazing rsv4 which can actually be had for cheaper then both.


I really hope MV can move forward and be competitive. Ilove their designs and I think they're hands down the most beautiful. I love my B3800 even with all it's flaws. I want them to be around and become a class leader so I can continue to enjoy their offerings. What do you guys think?
 

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How do you say that the minipanigale is a better machine?
Show me a duc without mods or lot of miles on the clock...
 

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As far as quality and owner satisfaction goes, I see many many more Ducs changing hands than MV's . I think MV owners keep their purchase longer for a reason.
 

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Sorry , I think MV is right on track at the moment. If they were selling shares, I would be buying them.

Price is correct, they don't need to sell any cheaper as I bought my MV over Ducati. Cheaper price implies cheaper product and lower perceived value. I specifically chose my MV over the Ducati and price alone wasn't a factor. They could rather add some value instead of drop the price.

They can get better fit and finish and improved reliable technology. A colour screen wouldn't hurt and LED headlights instead of the usual bulbs on the F3 for instance. The turismo veloce addresses both.
The funny wiring coming out the new bikes (that yellow cable for instance on the 3 cylinder bikes). Hopefully the racing tech will drip down into the production bikes resulting in better electronic packages as I rate that's the weakest point on the bikes at the moment.

Ducati fell off the boat completely with the 899. Wouldn't touch is with a stick. Dual sided swingarm, crappy headlights and old school screen combined with a useless motor. Also, they are covering all the motors with plastic due to the whiners complaining about the heat. Would rather find a second hand 1199 than waste my time with the 899. I also don't like the fact that the flagship bike looks EXACTLY the same as the (relatively) budget 899.

Aprilia made the biggest mistake putting the flagship face onto all its bikes (copy paste, not even tweaked for the model in question). The F3 looks similar to the F4, but is not the EXACT friggen face as what aprilia did putting the RSV4 onto the cheap 125 and scooter. Nice way to say F''you to the guys that spent big bucks on the RSV4. Its ok if they had similar styling, but to me it looked like they couldn't find a designer so they just took the fairing off the RSV 4 and put it onto every other model in the range.

Lastly the dealer and spares network which Giovanni says he's putting a lot of effort in. Issues and technical bulletins should be sent to the dealers from the factory and not let the dealers have to do the R&D for the factory.

My 2c.
 

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I think MV have always been regarded as an exclusive brand like an italian supercar that shifted small numbers at a high price to those that could afford them. Many of which hardly get ridden and spend more time in front of the fireplace like some sort of ornament. If you look on eBay here in the UK I guarantee the vast majority of F4's on there have done less than 1000 miles a year.
This tells me that people didn't buy them for their performance, reliability or running costs, they bought them for the design and the brand and the whole kudos that goes with that. The problem has always been though is that MV couldn't support itself as a business on its own for just those few customers.

Now the 3 cylinder range is great, it opens MV up to a whole new market, relatively competitive on price with the competition, maybe a little higher but you are buying an MV and I think they charge extra for that kudos?

The problem is though I think they treat those customers like the ones buying their top of the range bikes, but those customers while keen to own an MV are also people who like to ride their bikes, may even use them all year round and commute to work on them so they also need value for money so they ask questions like, "what are the service intervals and service cost?"
When compared with the competition they find those things cost twice as much and have to be done twice as often and they are out the door? Then there is the value for money on the actual bike. The new Brutale 800 RR is more than BMWs' S1000R, ok it has a marmite appeal but it beats the MV all round in performance and technology and if faced with paying the same money people want as many toys as they can get, same goes for the other European brands like ducati, KTM and aprilia.

When trying to sell a bike to a wider audience you need to appeal to what they want out of their bike and I'm not sure MV do that?

Take the new turismo Veloce as a prime example, a touring bike that MV don't expect you to tour on? It shares the same engine and running gear as the other 3 cylinder bikes so I'm presuming it shares the same service intervals. Who wants a tourer that they have to service every 3500 miles and then do a major valve clearance service every 7500? Errr no thank you.
 
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