MV Agusta Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My low fuel light doesn't work and I've traced the problem to the fuel level sensor, probe, thermistor, whatever it's called, thats mounted on the pump, filter assembly in the bottom of the fuel tank. Problem is, that part is no longer available from the factory. So, if anyone has one, or knows of a dealer etc that has a NOS one etc, I would be grateful to know of that.

Thanks.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,636 Posts
Do you have the part number?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
I'm stripping my bike and can get the sensor out the tank when it's off in a few weeks.

Sent from my LYA-L09 using Tapatalk
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,383 Posts
Check later models for the same part with a new number and still available. MV doesn't do a good job of updating parts lists when they supersede the part number.

I discovered this when helping a friend source a coolant tank neck for an older F4.... It's still available, but you have to go to a later year model for the new number (same part).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,565 Posts
?

Brutant:
Google it, they're ~$3-$10......
You'll have to solder it in:wink2:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,636 Posts
Brutant:
Google it, they're ~$3-$10......
You'll have to solder it in:wink2:
Noel, do you happen to have the thermistor part number and source that you found?

I have a NOS fuel sensor here that cost me around $180 and that was at a discount before the Moto Forza Fire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Brutant:
Google it, they're ~$3-$10......
You'll have to solder it in:wink2:
I did google it but no component came up, do you have a link or search term? Soldering is not a problem, I started my working life in electronics:wink2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,565 Posts
?

"fuel level thermister" is what I used
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Yeah, thats the same as for my link, the small cylindrical capsule type. So, does this install into some sort of housing or holder in the MV's case?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
Yeah, thats the same as for my link, the small cylindrical capsule type. So, does this install into some sort of housing or holder in the MV's case?
The later model fuel pumps look like they would just pop right in. The older ones may require minor modification to run the wires correctly.

You may want to check out this post on the Ducati.ms forums. They use a similar set up for the fuel light and I have used this information successfully to fix one (on a Ducati).

You would have to check the resistances required to trip the light on the MV to ensure the right thermistor is chosen, but it would <$2 fix at that point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,565 Posts
?

Yeah, thats the same as for my link, the small cylindrical capsule type. So, does this install into some sort of housing or holder in the MV's case?
brutant;
Yes, it sits in a plastic holder......it's just to control how deep the fuel is when the light comes on
Check pittmeister's link
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Bike is now off the road for winter so I think I'll have a mess with the OE thermistor housing to extract the actual thermistor then install a suitable replacement. Give me carbs and a reserve tap anytime!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
@brutant Here are a couple videos I found that helped me understand and get a visual on how (1K) NTC thermistors work with fuel...

The first short vid shows a new thermistor being soldered into a generic sensor that had been taken apart. Then shown 'bench' tested:


The second longer video has good explanation and demonstration:


Also copied failure mechanisms to help diagnose (I think my own fuel light falls in the second category):

"Identifying and replacing broken thermistors will help to prevent secondary damage to other systems.

1. The most common failure is an open circuit. These failures can arise because of mechanical separation between lead materials and resistor elements. Separation occurs because of handling damage, high/excessive heat, and thermal mismatching.

2. The second most commonly experienced issue with thermistors is drifting in the resistance value. This problem begins to occur as the thermistor ages, as well as when parameters change. This problem will cause inaccurate measurements, which in turn will prevent the thermistor from providing correct thermal compensation.

3. The least common failure mode is a short circuit."

I hope this information is accurate and helpful...those with greater knowledge, let me know and I will edit or remove content if needed.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top