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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey guys,

Well Pegasus Mfg Inc is finally up and running, we have completed our relocation and are now back to production. In between normal operations my father and I like to design cool parts for our passions. We've started on after market MV F4 frame plates, but right now I've turned attention to something more performance oriented. THE Forks. I'm tired of having to settle for the marzocchi units.

I'm curious how many fellow MV owners are interested in being able to use Ohlins front ends and not the superbike forks that cost more than gold. I'm talking say swapping out a Ducati 1198s set of forks onto a MV. Any interest? Basically were are looking into a triple tree/clamp set that will allow the use of larger/smaller diameter forks. And it would be a complete set with the top and bottom clamp and the stem and bearings. We could also use exotic materials like magnesium and maybe titanium:naughty:. Any interest yet?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hey Donsy,

Yea the full conversion is more complicated. You need the right clip-ons, the correct wheel and axle, rotors, calipers ect. But if you have the correct clamps all that can be sourced. And there are some other parts we would machine.
 

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And I'm laughing uncontrollably.
In my opinion, it's not worth putting the Ohlins from a Ducati onto the MV, if you're not getting the full money like Dave or Andrew, the best would be to get s set of cartridge kits from one of the other suspension companies.
Don't be fooled into the believe that those Ohlins forks on the Ducati's are any or much better than you standard suspension, do you have a 1000R or 1000S ?
I recently installed Andreani fork cartridges with great results, I also have a set of Mupo's, but they're still a bit of work in progress.
 

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I hate to see people poopoo ideas others have about doing something with ones bike. There are a million reasons one could come up with why not to make parts for the Agusta bikes, but if your passion is bikes and you have the means(machines/knowledge) to fab up new stuff then by all means go for it.

Sliding Ohlins forks into the Agusta triple shouldn't be to hard. Think all portions of the oem and R&T forks for Ohlins use dimensions less than what we have now. The easiest thing to do is to make spacer collars to take up the slack in the mounting points in the tree. If you want to get really fancy you could machine offsets into the spacers(provided there is enough room to work with) so there would be a little adjustability in the set up. If going full out then one could just make the offsets at the stem bearings like everyone else. But look into the Gilles design for something unique that could be done to start out with via the collar spacers then expanded into a full tree assembly if you wished to go all in. Based on what folks are willing to spend on their bikes, and the cost for expense, tooling, set up, cutting, etc. you might want to try the simplest design first.
And in going with a smaller diameter fork one could provide collars for the clipons as well.

I presume you'll be cutting from billet. If so, might want to stick with aluminum, or make a special run on Mg. if someone is willing to fork over the coin.....don't forget the added costs of having the Mg. properly coated and protected.
Forgetting the fact that Ti. will cost waaaay more than Al., and take more time to cut, it also weighs more too. Not to say it can't be done but i doubt one could trim the weight out of a Ti. piece to match the weight on an Al. piece. This is a part i wouldn't want to trim to thin/light and open myself up to legal action because it failed. Simply don't know how feasible it would be to try to go down that road, but if you are a sucker for punishment then go for it.
Think the same thing is going to apply for the frame plates as well. While saying something is Ti. might merely be a fashion statement. Thinking the lighter, cheaper(sellable) part would be in Al. and if someone wanted to pay more and have a heavier part just to say they have Ti. then you could do it. Although, trying to trim the Ti. down enough to be lighter than the aluminum is going to be a major challenge that i wouldn't wish on any proficient materials specialist. Check out any Bimota and you'll see they can get Al. parts pretty darn light and still be robust enough to hold up. Just don't know how much more metal can be taken out using Ti. considering its 60% heavier than Al. and only 50% stronger.
 

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I have no problem, I love it actually, when people fabricate stuff for their bikes. All I meant was that don't think that the standard run of the mill Ohlins is going to fix whatever problems you're having with the Marzocchi's.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
And I'm laughing uncontrollably.
In my opinion, it's not worth putting the Ohlins from a Ducati onto the MV, if you're not getting the full money like Dave or Andrew, the best would be to get s set of cartridge kits from one of the other suspension companies.
Don't be fooled into the believe that those Ohlins forks on the Ducati's are any or much better than you standard suspension, do you have a 1000R or 1000S ?
I recently installed Andreani fork cartridges with great results, I also have a set of Mupo's, but they're still a bit of work in progress.
Lol sorry for the mix up guys. So it sounds like I'm the only crazy one. I understand ohlins might not be so far above everyone else to justify the cost sometimes but IMO they are the best. And about the ducati forks i just used it as an example. Well if anyone is interested in a trick set of trees let me know.
 

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I don't think that anyone is poo pooing this idea.

Fact is that a there are, according to my experience, 6 parts to fabricate for this conversion.
Top triple, bottom triple, 2 x calliper spacers and 2 x wheel spacers.
It is possible that a suitable axle exists - if not then that would be the seventh item.

Then there are quite a few items to purchase in order to allow this conversion to work like considering fitment of another type of front mudguard as the MV one sure won't be compatable. Ensure that the Ohlins forks you intend to install have a 100mm calliper spacing as opposed to 108mm.
As mentioned previously you'll need a 52mm set of clipons with a 7/8th inch bar - also know that the best option to source is the Dan Kyle set that can rotate to adjust for angle, therefore height, reducing the likelihood of clearance issues at left and right steering lock similar to those experienced by anyone who has ever ridden a 2000 F4.

So, go for it - fabricate away. I encourage you. I'll cheer you along from the sidelines and offer my knowledge gained from doing this job myself.
 

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Some pics from 2009 / 2010....
 

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So, go for it - fabricate away. I encourage you. I'll cheer you along from the sidelines and offer my knowledge gained from doing this job myself.
You're such a good bloke Dons :)
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Hey guys, my thought about using a existing front end like that off of a ducati, is that it would save the need to manufacture the other pieces. If you grab the forks off of a 1198s or whereever Aprilia RSV4 wherever you can then get all the appropriate bottom end parts. The wheel axle, the spacers, the calipers the fender ect. because they are OEM forks. It saves the need to fabricate one off parts. Now granted it would eliminate the star wheels. PS Dave and R1 Andrew those are sick. I just don't have $30k to spend on a front end
 

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Some pics from 2009 / 2010....

I was also playing with the same idea, just sourcing the most parts from another brand, spacers are easy to make, but I think the axle is the is the most difficult to source when keeping the original wheels ?

I guess this axle came with the Öhlins fork ?
 

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Correct.

All you're doing with the axle is providing a solid bar on which the fabricated spacers can act as a supporting system for the wheel. This is actually quite easy for a skilled engineer to do.
Each fork has a hole without threads.
In the picture below area 1 & 2 are the locations where the axle (1) and fork spacer (2) locates into the fork. What isn't shown in the picture is a small threaded nut that screws onto the threaded end of the axle.
The wheel spacers (3 & 4) are similar in design to the MV Agusta wheel spacers, but of course, are subtly different to allow the thinner axle to be used and to take up the slightly different distance between the inside surface of the fork and the outer surface of the wheel.
 

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