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Discussion Starter #1
After seeing a Stradale in my local shop a few weeks ago and then finding out about the Turismo Veloce (and researching on this forum), I realised the TV in particular could make a great commuting bike that I would really enjoy every day. Attractive features for commuting include the cunning side cases, long service interval, detuned engine, claimed good fuel economy, custom mapping, and big tank. I'd love to hear from people commuting on the TV, or if you think it is a bad idea!

I'm commuting 82 miles a day on fast country roads in all weather and hoping to change my bike soon. Currently riding a 1994 BMW f650 (48 hp) which does about 140 miles per tank and 55 mpg (UK) [that's about 46 US mpg or 5.1 l/100km]. I would like a bike with more power, better handling, upright position, similar or better economy, good build quality, and more range. I would also like to be able to do all my own servicing and be able to run the bike up to a high mileage (my BMW has over 77,000 miles). The TV has way more power than I need, so I would expect to run it in touring mode all the time, or perhaps set up a custom mode for commuting (anyone do this?). The objective would be to improve fuel economy / extend the tank range.

The strongest other contenders are BMW F800ST / F800GT / F800GS (798cc twins, ~85hp). They are all a sensible choice but boring and inferior in many respects compared to the MVTV. The BMW bikes typically do 55-60 mpg (fuelly website http://www.fuelly.com/motorcycle/bmw/f800gs) but have a small tank (~16L) which is a major disadvantage when commuting. There are no TV's on the fuelly website and very few MV's. I have checked the threads on this forum regarding fuel economy and could not reach a firm conclusion... I would really like to know how economical it is when kept in touring mode, and what the tank range is. I would also like to know if anyone has run this engine to high mileage (e.g. over 50K miles). Before buying my F650 I checked the mileage of bikes for sale which confirmed they are long term reliable... I haven't managed to find any high mileage MV for sale but it might be because they are rare and people keep them.

Finally thanks for all the info on this forum - having a strong online community is another factor attracting me to this bike!
 

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I would suggest that MV Agusta and commuting are a bit of an oxymoron.
This bikes engine was originally created as a sport bike engine-detuned and some internals changed to give better mid-range torque but the emphysis is still SPORT touring. It relies on fairly high engine speed to work well, and that is not a big plus as a commuter.
I would also suggest that most MV owners would put fuel economy somewhere down in 10 th place on the list of priorities.
Also- the decal on the fuel tank is emphatic that no alcohol based fuels be used in the engine, so every time you fill up you buy the premium gasoline - which is often for me at least 20% more than regular.
There are a huge number of choices of bikes available today that are far better at commuting than this bike is, but they will never come close to all the meaningful experiences that the TV offers.
 

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The bike will fit your needs. I use it as a daily commuter and weekend warrior. I get around 200 miles to a tank sometimes less with some spirited riding. The bike is super confortable at least for me. The best of all is really fun to ride. The only issue and is a big one for me is getting parts for the bike takes a lot longer than others.
 

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Just got one and took it though the local city traffic snarl to my employers offices. I had the cases off so was getting through narrower gaps than the bars width but with them on it still pretty narrow & I learned my commuting skills in London so used to gridlock crawls. So the bike handle this well though if you do get stuck engine temps can rise pretty quick and the manual doesn't recommend leaving it at idle while stationary as it might over heat. Whilst it's also just a bike not sure how much self service is feasible when valve clearances are needed (due to your annual mileage) but oil/filter changes look easy to do. Saddle height is fairly high but narrow at front and it feels light to me (though last bike was a boat anchor weigh wise). It's a feisty bike to ride which may not suite as it's probably very different to the Bmw . Fuel ? I got over 220miles out of the 1st tank and probably get 200 out of current and I got 20 litres in on my 1st fill (still running it in). And if running all year in all weathers I'd get metal bits done with acf50 (not brakes or exhaust) to hinder corrosion
 

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If you ride on a fast country roads like you said, then this bike has plenry fun to offer. In a traffic jam its nimble and light but I don't like it's low speed fueling. This bike just wants to be riden above 3000rpms. If that is not a problem for you I would say go for it!


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So the bike handle this well though if you do get stuck engine temps can rise pretty quick and the manual doesn't recommend leaving it at idle while stationary as it might over heat.
To me this is the only significant factor for commuting. I have commuted on my bike and it is fine - it is quick handling to deal with stupid drivers, and is reasonably narrow for lane splitting. But it really doesn't like sitting at stoplight after stoplight after stoplight. Then again no bike really does, but my GS has more fan/cooling and doesn't mind as much.

Range with lots of city streets is a bit below 200 miles iirc. The mileage is fairly good - 42mpg plus or minus.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It's a feisty bike to ride which may not suite as it's probably very different to the Bmw .
Thanks for this which I didn't realise, and similar comment from TVLKAWASUKI pointing out it relies on relatively high engine speed which is not ideal for commuting - I agree.

As for being based on a sport bike engine, I liked this because if the engine can take that abuse it should be rock solid in detuned form as used in this bike (especially if kept in touring mode). Low speed fuelling on the F650 is awful, the MV can't possibly be worse Marko. Fortunately there is not much low speed sections or traffic lights on my current commute, which is why I am feeling the need for a faster bike (but not an actual sportsbike).
 

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You can commute on any bike if you adapt to their character, over the years I've commuted on an TZR125 FZR1000, Ducati 900SL. None were ideal for the London slog but I didn't buy them for that they were bought on a desire to have a bike I liked :D.
 

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Perfect bike to commute on. ~200 miles per tank on touring map on motorway and a roads ( I fill up with about 10-30 miles on the reserve counter and it will take 18-19ltrs ) nimble and slim.
I'm on ~14k miles now, the engine is detuned and now makes 80-90% of its torque at 3000rpm and it will happily bimble along without screwing the nuts off it, no need to use super grade fuel as being a commuter the fuel doesn't sit in the tank for any length of time, I switch between super and regular depending on where I fill up.
They do heat up when sitting at lights and filtering for long stretches but cools down quickly when back in the air flow.
As Macduff says if your using it all year treat it with some acf50 and it should keep it looking good through the winter.
But the fun comes at the weekend when you take it out and make it sing.


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A lot of money to spend on an everyday ride that will rack up the miles. However, if you have the cash burning a hole in your pocket and a desire to ride something exceptional, different and that you'll enjoy every minute on then why not.

There are a few points on my Turismo Veloce that haven't withstood the British climate too well but these aren't going to stop you riding, just be an inconvenience.

All 4 indicators have been replaced, the rears fill with water, the fronts I'm not sure if it was water or vibration as moisture wasn't evident. The replacements are all still going after about 3,000 miles since they were changed. After a wet ride a few weeks ago the rears looked waterlogged and parking in the sun for a day didn't seem to help so I drilled two very fine holes in the bottom of each. Water dripped out for a few minutes and stopped. This last weekend I've covered close to 1000 miles (now on over 5000 in total) with plenty of rain (North Yorks/Northumberland/Scots borders) and all four are still working and are mist free. I don't claim that drilling a hole will make them live forever but reckon that at least letting the moisture that's gotten in out again should at least extend their usability. I have some after-market replacements and materials ready to replace the rears when the time comes.

The quick-shifter stopped working after 1500 miles. I'm convinced it's also water related. My dealer has has a sensor on order for months now but still waiting for that. Clutch-less shifting up and down the box works well without it though.

Should you require parts to keep you moving expect to have to wait for them. The probability of off the shelf availability in the UK is slim, there is no importer, each dealer orders directly from the factory and it seems that they don't carry stock on a lot of items either so the chain can be quite a long one.

These two points aside, not show stoppers for me, I absolutely love the bike. I bought it for touring and recreational riding and personally would be reluctant to commute on it all year round. I would buy a 2nd bike I cared less about for that due to fears about corrosion and water ingress over months of winter riding. ACF50 treatment by an All Year Biker franchise would be the route I'd take if I were proposing to ride mine every day. I'll probably be doing this anyway as foul weather riding doesn't stop me going out for a ride under normal circumstances anyway.
 

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A lot of money to spend on an everyday ride that will rack up the miles. However, if you have the cash burning a hole in your pocket and a desire to ride something exceptional, different and that you'll enjoy every minute on then why not.

Using your same analogy Chas, it's also a lot of money to spend on a toy to sit in a garage most of its life as well lol
It's a one bike does all solution




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Microde,
A lady, with her head down, ran into the back of me at about 25mph and totaled my GS1200. I loved the GS, but the TV gets me even more excited. I get on it three times a day for a ten minute commute into town to my office and to lunch. I love this bike because it is beautiful to look at, feels current (not like an old mans bike, as my son opines), and so few people have them.
I take three hundred mile trips on it also. The seat is better than the GS and the tank holds over five gallons, a little more than the GS, I think. The GS does have better wind protection than the stock shield on the TV, but before I get the Puig windshield, I leave the plexy down and stay in clean air. One last thing for cruising, the cruise control is better than the GS for me, because you can easily set the speed number.
The touring map is good, but I changed to custom and added full power and soft gas. I wanted 110hp, not 90, when I wanted it, without having to think about changing it.
I have a KTM 450 EXC and the TV. There is no perfect bike, but the TV is pretty close for me.
Yes, It is good for commuting, Veloce.
 

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Using your same analogy Chas, it's also a lot of money to spend on a toy to sit in a garage most of its life as well lol
It's a one bike does all solution
Sure, I get that. However, as a commuter bike it needs use every weekday, during the winter months I reckon that's going to take it's toll on the finish and electrics unless you thoroughly clean, lube, polish and pamper every weekend. Who's frankly got the time to do that and keep it up. I have yet to try the ACF50 treatment, maybe that's the answer with relative winter neglect just a deep clean in the spring to restore the lustre.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not overly tender with my bikes, they're machines made to be ridden first and foremost. However, given the cost of my MV I'm maybe a touch more precious about it :)
 

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Sure, I get that. However, as a commuter bike it needs use every weekday, during the winter months I reckon that's going to take it's toll on the finish and electrics unless you thoroughly clean, lube, polish and pamper every weekend. Who's frankly got the time to do that and keep it up. I have yet to try the ACF50 treatment, maybe that's the answer with relative winter neglect just a deep clean in the spring to restore the lustre.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not overly tender with my bikes, they're machines made to be ridden first and foremost. However, given the cost of my MV I'm maybe a touch more precious about it :)


Oh It wasn't directed at you Chas, I know you take it out in the rain, (unavoidable living so close to Wales) you got decent mileage on it now and ride it like you stole it.
Personally I can't recommend ACF50 enough, especially for you keeping the bike outside until the garage is built (my bikes get treated twice a year) you can go the all year biker route (they wash it, snowfoam it, wash it again, dry it, treat it and polish it all for about £60, bargain, or you can do a deal for 2x treatments) but I find it far more economical to buy it by the quart about £30-35 and use a small compressor to apply it in a fine mist, a little goes a long way with it.
Sure you still get the odd furry nut but nothing serious and I've seen bikes that never see the rain in worse condition. It also drives moisture out the electrics as well.
Treat yer steed Chas.


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Microde,
A lady, with her head down, ran into the back of me at about 25mph and totaled my GS1200. I loved the GS, but the TV gets me even more excited. I get on it three times a day for a ten minute commute into town to my office and to lunch. I love this bike because it is beautiful to look at, feels current (not like an old mans bike, as my son opines), and so few people have them.
I take three hundred mile trips on it also. The seat is better than the GS and the tank holds over five gallons, a little more than the GS, I think. The GS does have better wind protection than the stock shield on the TV, but before I get the Puig windshield, I leave the plexy down and stay in clean air. One last thing for cruising, the cruise control is better than the GS for me, because you can easily set the speed number.
The touring map is good, but I changed to custom and added full power and soft gas. I wanted 110hp, not 90, when I wanted it, without having to think about changing it.
I have a KTM 450 EXC and the TV. There is no perfect bike, but the TV is pretty close for me.
Yes, It is good for commuting, Veloce.
I have a 2016 GS and the TV - they are pretty different temperaments. I do a lot of 2-up riding and the GS is much better than the TV for that. We can ride 2-up, but the lack of a top box and the short wheelbase make for a pretty "busy" ride for both of us. Riding position is actually a bit more neutral on the TV, but knee room is limited if you're over 6'.

If you're riding solo, then it becomes a different calculation, but they still are very different. I end up riding both solo, but the TV is mostly a play bike. It is much quicker handling which makes it fun in the twisties - but less fun on the highway. The GS is a much better long distance machine, and the gobs of torque are useful. That said, the triple is smooth as glass (the boxer is...not), the transmission on the TV is smoother, and the quick shift works well (the BMW isn't great). The howl of the triple is intoxicating.

The GS is an SUV, more like a land cruiser (or X5) while the TV is an SAV like the Porsche Macan. They both have their uses. I'm spoiled to have both :D
 

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I commute 1-2 times a week, when not taking the ferry, and it works as a break from that routine, especially since it's easy for me to take a scenic route home through the twisties. I like the plush suspension on ravaged city streets, and the narrow cases are a boon for lane splitting.

As others have said, gets hot in traffic, and for my 30 inch inseam the bike is a wee bit tall, which I start to notice in the city putting my toes down every other minute. I know this is psychological but to me it just feels like it hates the city and needs to be on the open road. If I was commuting every day on two wheels I'd get a cheap scooter to absorb the bulk of it, something like a Honda PCX150 that can handle a few miles on the freeway, will feel much more relaxed in the city, and lower operating costs.

The best bike for everything is two bikes. (or more)
 

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Nostatic,
GS and a TV? Nice. I agree with the GS being better on the freeway and the TV for the twisties. I think, while always being on a KTM EXC, the TV being narrower, taller and a hundred pounds lighter feels like a better saddle choice for me.

After my "tip over" with my wife in Fussen, Germany on the GS, I do not get to ride two up anymore, and I know the TV,s pillion seat seams a bit high, unlike the GS. I have to commute on my TV, although I could ride the KTM, but it is not very "professional", I am told by my wife for a dentist to get to work on. I only drive my 88 truck, I got in college, if it rains.

I am headed to "Two Wheels in Suches" with friends with a duc and GS, which is a two hour ride with twisties and am really stoked. Sorry for the ramble. I love bikes...mountain bikes, dirt, duals, road....

Yes, either get a Ruckus or ride the TV. Scooters are cool.:moped:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for all the interesting responses and discussion. It seems like most people feel the TV is good for commuting, but probably a bit too special for this duty alone. Quality issues around water ingress mentioned by Bumpkin are important and I spotted this in another thread too, maybe MV expect you to tour only in good weather? Your solution of drilling holes in the indicators is something my other bikes had as standard from the factory. This is also a problem in many cars to be fair. Concern over parts availability is also important and makes it hard to commit to this bike as an all rounder that has to be relied upon. It will probably do better as a second bike which can be used for commuting in better weather, and with a backup other bike in case of waiting for parts etc. Most also seem to agree the bike is not happy in traffic, not a major problem on my commute but it would put me off the bike as an all-rounder.

Bayareaveloce is correct that "The best bike for everything is two bikes. (or more)" - this seems really true for the TV which I don't think was the aim by MV - apparently Giovanni Castiglioni said of this model it is

"the first MV that people can buy as a first bike – normally an MV is a second bike, for your emotions.”

Seems based on this thread that they almost got there but not quite (for me anyway).
 

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This is the only bike I have owned where I take the long way home! The TVL is a great bike for commuting, as long as there is not heavy congested traffic.
 
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