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Discussion Starter #1
Installed my Tutoro chain oiler on the TV. Used for several years on the Caponord with no issues. Neat install on the TV using one of the angle brackets supplied with the unit. Needed a longer feed tube as the reservoir is located on the opposite side from the chain, Tutoro sell all parts individually so no problem.

Having owned a Scott oilers and an electronic Pro-oiler over the years I've found the Tutoro to be the best solution. No electrical or vacuum connections. Only works when the bike is moving, very simple to adjust the flow. Better and cheaper than a Scott oiler, not better than a Pro-oiler but a lot cheaper and simpler to install.

I had it fitted for about 15K miles on the Capo. Chain adjustment was rarely required, it always kept the chain clean and resistant to corrosion on the links. The front sprocket was looking worn though at 17k miles.

I know the use of chain oilers splits opinion, and I admit I have no hard evidence to claim prolonged chain life. If you are 'anti oiler' that's fine with me.:grin2:
 

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Installed my Tutoro chain oiler on the TV. Used for several years on the Caponord with no issues. Neat install on the TV using one of the angle brackets supplied with the unit. Needed a longer feed tube as the reservoir is located on the opposite side from the chain, Tutoro sell all parts individually so no problem.

Having owned a Scott oilers and an electronic Pro-oiler over the years I've found the Tutoro to be the best solution. No electrical or vacuum connections. Only works when the bike is moving, very simple to adjust the flow. Better and cheaper than a Scott oiler, not better than a Pro-oiler but a lot cheaper and simpler to install.

I had it fitted for about 15K miles on the Capo. Chain adjustment was rarely required, it always kept the chain clean and resistant to corrosion on the links. The front sprocket was looking worn though at 17k miles.

I know the use of chain oilers splits opinion, and I admit I have no hard evidence to claim prolonged chain life. If you are 'anti oiler' that's fine with me.:grin2:

I did ask myself about a Tutoro. Ordered one, did consider a lot of position, and put it on my wife's bike (Street Triple), where there was a lot more possibilities to place it. And installed a CLS Evo on my TV (which is virtually not visible, unless you look at the rear sprocket). The main problem I see with the Tutoro is that it is quite fragile when the kid's feet are around as passenger (changed the tank 2 times already for this reason): and it's basically at the only place you can position it...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The oil supplied by Tutoro. Half a litre lasts for thousands of miles. Tutoro go to lengths to put you off using alternatives, claiming that some lubes will damage some of the components in the oiler. Well they would, but the cost of using theirs is not great so not worth the risk really.

They now offer two weights, one for upto ambient of 25 C and one where the ambient ambient is mostly over 25 C. I have used the upto 25 C one without issue in temps between 10 and 35 C. It's easy to adjust the flow by tweaking the control thumbscrew. It is important to remember that the Tutoro does only allow oil to flow when the bike is moving, I guess you could say it is 'semi-automatic'. If fully auto flow control is important, then a different system with a positive displacement electric 'pump' and speed sensing would be a better, but more expensive option.
 

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The oil supplied by Tutoro. Half a litre lasts for thousands of miles. Tutoro go to lengths to put you off using alternatives, claiming that some lubes will damage some of the components in the oiler. Well they would, but the cost of using theirs is not great so not worth the risk really.

They now offer two weights, one for upto ambient of 25 C and one where the ambient ambient is mostly over 25 C. I have used the upto 25 C one without issue in temps between 10 and 35 C. It's easy to adjust the flow by tweaking the control thumbscrew. It is important to remember that the Tutoro does only allow oil to flow when the bike is moving, I guess you could say it is 'semi-automatic'. If fully auto flow control is important, then a different system with a positive displacement electric 'pump' and speed sensing would be a better, but more expensive option.

Definitely, the CLS Evo (with electronic control of the flow) is much more expensive. But you can fully hide it, and modulate the flow while it rains or according to the roads you are riding (mud, sand). Additionally there is not temperature impact on the flow. Cost is 4-5 times the cost of a Tutoro.
 

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I love how those auto-oilers save time on lubing your chain, but what I hate about them is they're messy. And because they make you lazy, most people don't bother cleaning their chain for thousands of miles and the result is a horrible sticky rear wheel with a glue covered chain. Not to mention those fling like there's no tomorrow.
 

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I love how those auto-oilers save time on lubing your chain, but what I hate about them is they're messy. And because they make you lazy, most people don't bother cleaning their chain for thousands of miles and the result is a horrible sticky rear wheel with a glue covered chain. Not to mention those fling like there's no tomorrow.
That's a legend: chain doesn't need cleaning with auto-oilers, and as for the rear wheel, it's definitely easier to clean than the front wheel, there is nothing sticky on it (which is not the case when you spray grease on the chain, which is including some glue so it sticks to the chain… and as it sticks to the chain, it is also allowing dirt to get sticked on the chain)...
 

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That's a legend: chain doesn't need cleaning with auto-oilers, and as for the rear wheel, it's definitely easier to clean than the front wheel, there is nothing sticky on it (which is not the case when you spray grease on the chain, which is including some glue so it sticks to the chain… and as it sticks to the chain, it is also allowing dirt to get sticked on the chain)...
It was just my experience from our shop where we wash and detail motorcycles. The bikes having Scottoiler had insame amount of sticky dirt on their rear wheels and front sprockets. Maybe it was just the owners' lazyness and not much to do with the scottoilers but that was mostly the case for us.

I rather use non-fling chain lubes (putoline tech chain or muc off xtreme lube) on MV since somehow TV itself is more prone to flinging chain lube everywhere compared to other bikes I had.
 

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It was just my experience from our shop where we wash and detail motorcycles. The bikes having Scottoiler had insame amount of sticky dirt on their rear wheels and front sprockets. Maybe it was just the owners' lazyness and not much to do with the scottoilers but that was mostly the case for us.

I rather use non-fling chain lubes (putoline tech chain or muc off xtreme lube) on MV since somehow TV itself is more prone to flinging chain lube everywhere compared to other bikes I had.

I did used Scottoiler on my previous bikes, and maintained them clean. It's easy to do, and it also allows to do regular checks. Not everyone does that.
Now the key advantage is that I do not need to care about the chain during the week-ends of long rides, and that whatever the weather (and I won't even mention the time I win for the drinks before the dinner :-D)
 

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I rather use non-fling chain lubes (putoline tech chain or muc off xtreme lube) on MV since somehow TV itself is more prone to flinging chain lube everywhere compared to other bikes I had.
Dry Lube.

Any of the last century alchimic concoction will fling chain lube everywhere.

Chain lube won't stick on the chain,
but white rims and/or light colored jacket will be peppered with durable grease spots.
...do regular checks. Not everyone does that.
Do it at 30 000 km (18 000 mi)
Check the chain and have it replaced.

Inbeetween look at the chain
when it's still there dandy pansy.

...Now the key advantage is that I do not need to care about the chain during the week-ends of long rides, and that whatever the weather (and I won't even mention the time I win for the drinks before the dinner :-D)
Define long ride.
A WE ride to BCN is about 2 300 km (1 400 mi)
might be a short WE and not a long ride in your book?

Never checked the transmission chain during the WE.
Each time I had it to start with.
It was still there back in the garage.
Easy nifty.

Had shaft drives fail, crash and destroy expensive transmissions.
Up to now no transmission chain ever failed before the 30 000 km service.

Only once on the Stradale :frown2: the shop botched the chain replacement!

Chain was lubed by a generous engine oïl leak at the new front sprocket.
Wasn't worried about new chain links or rollers squeaking dry.
Saved me a whatchamacallit "automatic" chain oiler install for a while.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
As I said in the thread starter, nothing splits opinion like chain oilers! Fact is, however you maintain the chain you will get some mess, or a rusting eyesore.

Years ago you could soak the chain in a pot of waxy stuff on the stove when your mom was out. Soon gave up on that idea.:laugh:
 

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I like for my wheels to shine and do not ride in the rain, although I ride most every day, year around. For me it is cleaning with Simple Green and Chain Wax.
 
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