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One of the problems I have had with multiple bikes is that they each have their own personality and handle, brake, balance differently. Going from one to another always resulys in a certain "aclimitization" period during which I am vulnerable and not comfy. A case of melding man to machine if you will. I suppose if I rode each one every day that wouldn't be such an issue but that's out of the question. If I were good it wouldn't be either.

Back when I was flying prop planes we were "dual qualified" meaning that we could fly Convairs and Martins. One on one leg and the other on the next. I can tell you that it can get very confusing at times between cockpits and one guy landed a Martin gear up in Binghamton N.Y. (shithole in bad wx) because he had come out of a Convair (whose gear and flap controls were in the opposite position) into a Martin and screwed it up. Both guys actually. They stooped the "dual qual" after that. How many times have you ridden a bike with a reverse shift pattern to the one you're used to? Tell me you didn't go the wrong way at least once.
 

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One of the problems I have had with multiple bikes is that they each have their own personality and handle, brake, balance differently. Going from one to another always resulys in a certain "aclimitization" period during which I am vulnerable and not comfy. A case of melding man to machine if you will. I suppose if I rode each one every day that wouldn't be such an issue but that's out of the question. If I were good it wouldn't be either.

Back when I was flying prop planes we were "dual qualified" meaning that we could fly Convairs and Martins. One on one leg and the other on the next. I can tell you that it can get very confusing at times between cockpits and one guy landed a Martin gear up in Binghamton N.Y. (shithole in bad wx) because he had come out of a Convair (whose gear and flap controls were in the opposite position) into a Martin and screwed it up. Both guys actually. They stooped the "dual qual" after that. How many times have you ridden a bike with a reverse shift pattern to the one you're used to? Tell me you didn't go the wrong way at least once.
+1 on this.


I've owned up to three bike simultaneously. When I had the MV, 999, and the 748, I think I only rode the 748 to test ride it and when I managed to do a track day on it I nearly scared myself silly because I wasn't used to it. The 999 was strictly track and the MV was street. Since I hardly rode street I was never comfortable on the MV.

I finally sold the 999 and 748 and rode the MV more. Gradually I am becoming more comfortable with it. Recently I picked up the ZX-7R to ride street and because I always wanted one. I am finding that the MV is sitting again.

So there's a lot of things to take in consideration. You have to be realistic as to how much you will use the other bikes. Nothing hurts a bike more maintenance-wise than just having it sitting there all year. And if it's outside, forget about it! It's not healthy for a bike to just sit. So if you buy multiple bikes you will need to assess your usage after some time and decide if it's worth it to pay for and maintain more than 1 bike.

For me, 2 is my limit for now.

On the other hand, if you are privileged to own more than 1, it would be nice if you could cover multiple bases.
Example:
1 bike for commuting that you can abuse and park anywhere
1 bike for track duty
1 bike for bike night poser value
1 bike for 2-up cruising that's comfortable for a passenger (good investment if you're married and your wife likes to ride)
 

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Honda CH150 Elite Nothing is better than this in the city.
MV Agusta F4-1000 Tunnel vision effect.
BMW R1150 Rockster Travelling the distances.
Yamaha XJ750R Day, Week(s) everywhere bike.
BMW K75S Open road.
Campagnolo Saves on Gas, no carbon footprint.

I ride them all and enjoy every ride, it is like different shoes for different occasions.

Enjoy the ride the roads are there.
 

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One of the problems I have had with multiple bikes is that they each have their own personality and handle, brake, balance differently. Going from one to another always resulys in a certain "aclimitization" period during which I am vulnerable and not comfy. A case of melding man to machine if you will. I suppose if I rode each one every day that wouldn't be such an issue but that's out of the question. If I were good it wouldn't be either.
I already said that you old fool......

http://www.mvagusta.net/forum/showpost.php?p=388913&postcount=75
 

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I currently have 9 bikes on the road, with a mix that is varied and extreme

04 Brutale F4 750 - adrenaline junkie
06 BMW R1200GS Adenture - gets ridden the most, the big ass SUV of motorcycles, those alum shipping containers can suck an arm load of groceries, makes touring a breeze.
06 Duc SR21000 - mostly ridden by my son, its a little rough, rash for everyday use by me
95 Triumph Thunderbird - 955 jeckle-n-hyde 100HP modified, fun in a triple kind of way - doesn't get many miles added, the MV usurped it's position in the shed.
79 Triumph Bonneville Special 750 - reworked for torque and reliability, light and fun around town
79 Ducati Darmah SD900 - my most recent purchase, fast becoming a favorite until tonight when the starter spragg blew.
77 Laverda 1000 Jota Triple with the 180 deg crank - there is something about this bike, it is a beast, but runs lovely, so unique and rare
75 Triumph Trident T160 - did a long ride this year on it to the Norton rally, nice tourer but lacks the long legs of the Laverda.
69 Norton 750 "S" Commando - well what can I say, this Norton is a treasure
57 MV 125 TREL is not licenced this year and doesn't count
1961 MV Chicco Scooter is not running and doesn't count

All have left foot change, the Norton is right foot change for something different. The older bikes are on a collector plate and cost a pittence a year to have plated for the road. The big issue is keeping each bike ready, battery charged, tires pumped, fluids changed and checked.

I am spoiled for choice and I don't think I would willingly loose any one in particular - the variety keeps me a happy camper. Having the classics selection keeps one constantly reminded of our heritage and it is not all about horsepower.

The Laverda was the Superbike of the late 70's, it could do 140MPH, had double overhead cams, triple disk brakes and was what everyone envied - until Honda came along....it is nice to have a benchmark like the Laverda.

The Darmah & Jota are missing from this picture.
 

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I currently have 9 bikes on the road, with a mix that is varied and extreme

04 Brutale F4 750 - adrenaline junkie
06 BMW R1200GS Adenture - gets ridden the most, the big ass SUV of motorcycles, those alum shipping containers can suck an arm load of groceries, makes touring a breeze.
06 Duc SR21000 - mostly ridden by my son, its a little rough, rash for everyday use by me
95 Triumph Thunderbird - 955 jeckle-n-hyde 100HP modified, fun in a triple kind of way - doesn't get many miles added, the MV usurped it's position in the shed.
79 Triumph Bonneville Special 750 - reworked for torque and reliability, light and fun around town
79 Ducati Darmah SD900 - my most recent purchase, fast becoming a favorite until tonight when the starter spragg blew.
77 Laverda 1000 Jota Triple with the 180 deg crank - there is something about this bike, it is a beast, but runs lovely, so unique and rare
75 Triumph Trident T160 - did a long ride this year on it to the Norton rally, nice tourer but lacks the long legs of the Laverda.
69 Norton 750 "S" Commando - well what can I say, this Norton is a treasure
57 MV 125 TREL is not licenced this year and doesn't count
1961 MV Chicco Scooter is not running and doesn't count

All have left foot change, the Norton is right foot change for something different. The older bikes are on a collector plate and cost a pittence a year to have plated for the road. The big issue is keeping each bike ready, battery charged, tires pumped, fluids changed and checked.

I am spoiled for choice and I don't think I would willingly loose any one in particular - the variety keeps me a happy camper. Having the classics selection keeps one constantly reminded of our heritage and it is not all about horsepower.

The Laverda was the Superbike of the late 70's, it could do 140MPH, had double overhead cams, triple disk brakes and was what everyone envied - until Honda came along....it is nice to have a benchmark like the Laverda.

The Darmah & Jota are missing from this picture.
What a beautiful collection!

:mouthwate
 

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Old thread revival !! @Diablita , after you reach the required 5 posts to unlock private messages you should send him a message. This thread is 12 years old and he may or may not ever see your inquiry.
 
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