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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, got a dragster RR. And want to learn how to wheelie the bike whitout ending up wrecking it on a track.


Can some more experienced help me on some tips on how to start ? :)


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Discussion Starter #3
Here's one of the tons of videos on youtube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pY0h82cEyrA

Here's a testimonial:

https://www.bike-urious.com/1-2-enrolling-at-wheelie-university/


It may behoove you to look up wheelie schools in your area. Yeah, such things were self learned in the old days but you don't really want to tear up the suspension or drop your new MV...


Have seen some. But they often go in on TC. And what to best use in the start.

Therfor i ask here. Whete some probably have testet befor me




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Hi, got a dragster RR. And want to learn how to wheelie the bike whitout ending up wrecking it on a track.


Can some more experienced help me on some tips on how to start ? <img src="http://www.mvagusta.net/forum/images/smilies/smile.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Smile" class="inlineimg" />


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Everyone is different and I can only go on personal experience, but I taught myself and how I now teach others is as follows:-

Don't try to wheelie.

Start by taking off from the traffic lights as fast as you can. On the occasions you feel the front to lift, put it down straight away.

Now practice putting it down slowly as soon as it starts lifting. This will give you the throttle control when in about a years time you are wheeling properly to keep it at the balance point (think of it as a balance area and not point).

The trick is to put the front wheel down as slowly as possible. As soon as it lifts, you will sh1t yourself and think you are going to loop it. Chances are, you're just expanding the forks and the tyre hasn't even left the tarmac...don't worry, this is normal. Still practice putting it down slowly.

Try accelerating quickly at say 50% throttle to just before the power comes in (9K revs? Not sure on your bike) then snapping it fully open to help lift it. You can also roll off slightly then crack it open - this has the effect of loading up / compressing the forks so they then unload and when they do, snap open the throttle.

When you start doing stand ups, you can also bounce the front a bit to help.

As you get used to lifting the front slightly, and then putting it down with control, try just letting it rise a bit higher each time before putting it down slowly again. Again, start low and keep practicing putting it down slowly. As the wheel lifts, you will start by putting it down too quickly and snapping it shut, but over time as it lifts you'll get used to rolling off the throttle instead, which in turn will control the rate of lift of the front wheel. As the wheel gets higher, you need less throttle to keep the wheel afloat, until you're at the balance point / area and you'll be going down the road on the back wheel with a neutral throttle, giving it tiny inputs to keep the wheel there.

As you get higher and higher, you will feel a point where you are on the balance point / area and little throttle movements will keep you there. It's a lot higher than you think but with practice you'll get there.

Be prepared for lots of practice and don't rush it - remember, put it down slowly first then work on height once you've mastered touching down gracefully. Imagine the front wheel 10cm off the tarmac, but going along at that height. You'll never keep it there as you'll soon run out of revs as you will need lots of throttle to stop it dropping. Try not to rev to the limiter either, putting it back down before the limiter makes you put it down.

Do the above in first gear as this will also teach you throttle control. When you have mastered the art, try second gear over undulations in the road / humps.

I always wheelie in second gear as it's not as hard to control as first gear, and keep it in that gear. Years of rebuilding gearboxes as I used to do (clutchless) gearchanges back then, and rounded off lots of gear dogs and bent selector forks. I don't understand how quickshifters get around this problem as it's effectively the same thing (in my racing days many years ago, we used the kill switch to change gear and kept the throttle pinned). Some people go through the box, I just stick with 2nd gear as 100mph stand up wheelies are good enough for me.

Others wheelie just as well with the clutch - I personally don't like it as it comes up too quickly for me, but feel free to try it.

Uphill is easiest, especially if you're riding into a wind, to keep the front up. Downhill with a tail wind is tricky and hard to keep it going - you haveto go further back to get to the balance point / area which feels un-natural.

Most say cover the back brake for that just incase situation - me personally I don't, rolling off has always been enough and that's why I tell people to practice putting it down slowly first, as this gives you the throttle control to lift it slowly, go along for as long as you want, and put it down slowly.

Invest in a steering damper.

Expect to chew through rear tyres and chain and sprockets.

Enjoy it, it's great fun when you master it.

Good luck. Any questions then just ask. The above is my way from self taught only. _DSC3586_1561055001913.JPG

https://vimeo.com/21554863


_DSC3586_1561055001913.JPG
 

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...something about taking advice from a guy with the moniker of "HIGHSIDE"...!:smoking::wave:
 

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...something about taking advice from a guy with the moniker of "HIGHSIDE"...!<img src="http://www.mvagusta.net/forum/images/smilies/smoking.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Smoking" class="inlineimg" /><img src="http://www.mvagusta.net/forum/images/smilies/wave.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Wave" class="inlineimg" />
???
 

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Side note....turn traction control OFF. As soon as the ECU senses rear wheel speed is higher than front wheel it is going to cut power and the front wheel is coming down. Now. If you get it up at all.
 

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There are many videos out there but if you want to learn use another bike. Find a dirt bike so you can bin it without worry.

If you yolo then it’s easy mode. Pull throttle back at a complete stop and it will easily lift the front tire. These bikes are wheelie machines and if it’s not working add more throttle till it does. This can be very dangerous if you give it too much but you’ll know when it’s enough.

There are also wheelie machines that you can find. It’s basically a metal arm holding the bike in place and allows you to wheelie without fear of dropping the bike to sending into whatever is in front you.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
You cant wheelie.... and what to start practicing and learning that on a Dragster 800.


Jupp. Its what i got;)

Also its a perfect beginners bike xD

Starting only a little on a track.

But will probably Get a Track bike in a few weeks. So going to learn on That for the most part.


Yeah am a rookie driver, and am 30. So if i are going to have some fun. Its now befor im to old xD

I understand That bikes are alot cheaper in other countrys. Here whete i live my 2015 dra RR cost $20.000 xD so am not trying to wreck it my first week


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Discussion Starter #13
Side note....turn traction control OFF. As soon as the ECU senses rear wheel speed is higher than front wheel it is going to cut power and the front wheel is coming down. Now. If you get it up at all.


The RR did lift in first when i got it in TC8 xD

But going to play at a airfield in a few days. So a good place to start befor i Get a track bike


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Jupp. Its what i got;)

I understand That bikes are alot cheaper in other countrys. Here whete i live my 2015 dra RR cost $20.000 xD so am not trying to wreck it my first week
First thing that came to your mind was wheeling as a rookie rider....with such a powerful motorcycle....
Accident in the making.
 

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Learn in the dirt - you are going to wreck learning wheelies, it is just that simple. You need to think about minimizing loss at this point. Cheap dirt bike, helmet and other pro, Go ahead and drink a bit and have a time of it, and stay the hell off public roads. Keep the damage to yourself.
Cheers and have fun.
 

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I'll second Atom's dirt bike advice. The added benefit is that you get a dirt bike. If you don't ride dirt, you're missing half of motorcycling.
 

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Third on dirt bike advice: something light and reasonable. A pitfall is slamming a bike down hard after a wheelie and doing significant damage, and possibly losing control. In my opinion: save it for the track or off road.
 

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Or go to a wheelie school that uses a cut off stick. That way you can be super heavy handed at first without fear of looping (or f#cking up your fork seals etc.).

I could already wheelie a dirt bike when I went but a 200kg road bike (let alone a faired sports bike) is a different proposition. I spent the morning playing on his fazer and then moved the stick onto my bike.

There are loads of techniques (pure power, clutching, on and off throttle using fork rebound, rear brake ......) and it is good to try a few.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Third on dirt bike advice: something light and reasonable. A pitfall is slamming a bike down hard after a wheelie and doing significant damage, and possibly losing control. In my opinion: save it for the track or off road.


Going to buy a dirt/motard.

And it will be for closed areas or track.

The laws in norway is hard. And expensive if you Get a ticket xD

$500-1000 for lift of front/back wheel. And points in your licence. Max 8 in 2 yr


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I always try to keep both wheels on the ground...you go faster that way.

Even back in my early motocross days, tried to get back on the ground after a jump as quick as possible.
These days the MX guys do a "scrub" going over a jump to get back down as quick as possible....unless, of course, they are doing a double or triple jump.

Wheelies are nice for showing off...as are stoppies. That what those stunter guys do....gets monotonous after a while. I mean, how many different ways can you do a wheelie/stoppy???

Now, a Trials rider??? That is a magician on a bike.

Go take trials riding lessons....you will be able to do all the wheelies you want after that.
 
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