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The Northeast Corridor is a different animal. Motor Forza is located in southern California heavily situated in "bike culture". There are what 10 or so dealership/shops all around. There is serious money available as well to those few who know what I'm talking about. Like buying bikes with cash, and yes I sadly personally know... California has numerous racecourses and twisties. Now over here its freaking hardcore. No time to have total lux experiences. No time to treat owning a boutique brand as a "toy" just to look noticeable. In fact, it's in one's best interest NOT to be noticed or have some shit most likely happen like getting run down, or have your bike stolen. I never expect my B4 to be the same when returning from parking no matter how protected. Many more haters on the east. If you think there are fewer bikers out there come to the east coast. You'll be shocked at the different mentality. No dealer meetings are going to reveal the reality of what takes to continue to ride little alone encourage anyone to start. --Rant number two. Maybe my last cup of coffee for today.
 

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The main things I took away from the dealer conference:

1. Timur is approachable and you can have a good chat with him. Giovanni or Claudio were not.
2. Timur seems to be an open book. He does not hide or deny past or current problems like the Italians would. He makes it no secret that his family put up a lot of money to purchase MV and now it is on him to make it work.
3. He has a concrete plan that he following and the company and thus the employees have some direction. The Italians had dozens of plans, the "plan" seemed to change every year or so, and they were pointing in a bunch of different directions at the same time. I don't know for sure if Timor's plan will work out. Like his plan or not, at least everyone involved company execs, employees, distributors, and dealers have direction what to work towards, and if you don't agree you can get off the train.
4. Timur seems to be a doer not just a talker. He clearly laid out the work he did behind the scenes during his first year, i.e. re-establish supplier relations, and fix the supply chain. It was completely effed up and hardly any suppliers wanted to do business with MV anymore. Makes sense to me to have that in place before pushing on the sales side which is the part that is more visible to you and I. Now he is moving forward with the sales side. New organization in the US, new product plans are in place, marketing plans are being formulated, some of it already starting to be executed. What I like, while it may not be perfect, at least things are moving and stuff is getting done. With the Italians, it was always talk, talk, talk; blah, blah, blah, and nothing ever got done.
5. Timur looks at a problem from many different angles and often from a way that is unorthodox in the traditional motorcycle industry way. I like that! The consumers have changed A LOT. I see that in the 20 years since I owned a dealership. Completely different demands and expectations. I understand what he is saying about the Millennials. I don't really understand that generation and what makes them tick. But I can see his argument that it is not that the Millennials will not buy motorcycles. But Millennials have to be sold on motorcycles in a different way. They are looking for different attributes in a product than our generations. Most of us were all about the mechanical aspects of the bike, horse power, weight, 0-60, top speed, etc. The Millennials may not care about that, but you may be able to capture them with other attributes like ease of use (an SCS clutch makes it almost as easy as a scooter), digital connectivity with other riders to share their experiences (that's what they do on video games all day long) when we old guys go riding to get away form everyone, etc. A good product alone is not enough, people nowadays are looking to buy a compete experience, the product providing the experience is just the tool to get there.
I don't know if his approach will work but at least he is trying something different. The downward spiral the MC industry is in, is proof that the traditional way no longer works!
Umm keep in mind a millennial is between 39 and 24 years of age. That is a huge age gap and earning potential difference from the oldest to the youngest.

One of the issues faced is that prices of motorcycles have really increased a lot. I would love to buy a new bike, but cannot justify it, even though I can afford to. My 2012 F3 is not that much different to a 2019 F3. I would have to pay in 2-3 times the 2nd hand value of my 2012 to upgrade.

Can I afford the damn thing is the first question. The next thing is do I want it and how does it make me feel. I assure you, not having a SCS clutch is not a reason people are not buying motorcycles.
 

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What I still don't understand is the 5% they want to take from Harley? I want a MV and not a harley.

Second you can also increase profits with good clothing line. Needs to make sense for each country it is carried in.
 

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Umm keep in mind a millennial is between 39 and 24 years of age. That is a huge age gap and earning potential difference from the oldest to the youngest.

One of the issues faced is that prices of motorcycles have really increased a lot. I would love to buy a new bike, but cannot justify it, even though I can afford to. My 2012 F3 is not that much different to a 2019 F3. I would have to pay in 2-3 times the 2nd hand value of my 2012 to upgrade.

Can I afford the damn thing is the first question. The next thing is do I want it and how does it make me feel. I assure you, not having a SCS clutch is not a reason people are not buying motorcycles.
and this is why vintage bikes keep flipping hands. Cheap instant biker experience. I just can't imagine anyone buying new for a quick fix just to score dates unless wads of cash aren't an issue. It's simply not reality folks --whatever the f that is anymore.

Long term bikers are their own demographic no matter their age. People who have been around the block a few times and maybe even drug up and down the block a few times know what they want. If they don't, welcomed surprises bring MV bliss. What most worries me is a dependence on advanced electronics to save the day, to drive innovation. That just seems so incredibly dated even with cutting edge developments, even with a vision. Keep it simple and refined guys, keep it simple, keep it badass. Millennials want to experience, give them the purity of mean-ass grace. MV was conceived as such. Art in motion is unapologetic.
 

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What I still don't understand is the 5% they want to take from Harley? I want a MV and not a harley.

Second you can also increase profits with good clothing line. Needs to make sense for each country it is carried in.
I agree, buyers of both HD and MV don't really cross shop. I'm not a cruiser guy and big air cooled V twins don't tug at my heartstrings.
I don't think it's all about just increasing profits as much as it is to improve the product, expand the line up and customer base. They need to keep the lights on, and therefore need to generate capital to reinvest, so increasing the output is important, expanding beyond producing more than great bikes would be wrong (IMO). I could get behind hind accessories, such as luggage in partnership with a quality manufacture.

For now pumping out 5000 bikes and making spare parts available would be a great bench mark for 2020.
 

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Insurance costs are the primary hindrance to young people buying new motorcycles in the USA. I don't know about other countries.

If you have to finance the new bike you have to have full coverage insurance. A young male, even with a clean driving record, finds the insurance policy costs more than the bike itself.

Many reasons for that fact, not the least of which is the cost to repair a bike that just tipped over in the driveway. MSRP on Japanese brand parts is just as high as MSRP on European bikes and labor rates at dealerships are now over $100 (more like $150) per hour pretty much nationwide.

Add to that the fact no one repairs the parts, everyone just puts on new ones, and a bike can be a total loss with only minor cosmetic damages.

Want to know why Millennials buy old bikes and mod them? No insurance expenses.
 

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Want to know why Millennials buy old bikes and mod them? No insurance expenses.
No over commitment! Around here millennials often are swamped with educational expenses. But all in all old bikes are short-lived moments tho. That said, I'm happy to report I encouraged one to get a bike this eve -- gave him key tips to make it happen. He'll be looking at MVs but wisely said he wants a beater to start. He'll go far... a biker in the making! :yo: >:)
 

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The cost of ownership is a major factor when in comes to motorcycle. I am one of the very few with a garage space, so that is a huge factor as well.
In Boston cheap Chinese scooters are the vehicle of choice for a lot of people not just millennials.
MV is a premium brand so their linking up with Loncin Motor Co, is a way to sell cheap bikes without damaging MV's premium status.
 

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Reading all your comments one can not help to point out how different market enviroment and customer motivation is here in Europe from the States. Now, not all European markets are the same, and of course it differs if you live in a big city like London or Rome or if you live in Zagreb like myself. Where I live, we usually don’t have big issues with insurance - we mostly buy cash and avoid paying full insurance coverage but only obligatory registration insurance.
Bikes are not in danger of being stolen so much. Yes we keep our bikes in garage if possible, but it’s not a deal breaker. Again, it’s different in some big cities but in general you can travel around EU and leave your bike almost everywhere. I think it’s also safer to ride in EU. We have strickt rules for road users and many speed cameras, so it’s usually bikers who are braking the rules and acting crazy. Most of bikers that got killed in my country in last year were bikers that went off the road by themselves (my guess is more then 60%). BMW GS is the most sold model in my market (>20.000$). BMW and Ducati are very strong here. Harley also. MV is very rare due to the weak sales and service network. Taking share from Ducati, BMW and Harley would be very hard tasl in short term.
Bikers like to get together and ride together, mostly for pleasure and fun. In some regions scuters are very strong because they are practical to move around but these people also buy motorcycles as a second bike to travel or go to the race track on the weekends.
So in general bikes are everywhere, they are part of the culture and dealers are growing each year. Only few brands don’t make it - like MV unfortunately.


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Reading all your comments one can not help to point out how different market enviroment and customer motivation is here in Europe from the States. Now, not all European markets are the same, and of course it differs if you live in a big city like London or Rome or if you live in Zagreb like myself. Where I live, we usually don’t have big issues with insurance - we mostly buy cash and avoid paying full insurance coverage but only obligatory registration insurance.
Bikes are not in danger of being stolen so much. Yes we keep our bikes in garage if possible, but it’s not a deal breaker. Again, it’s different in some big cities but in general you can travel around EU and leave your bike almost everywhere. I think it’s also safer to ride in EU. We have strickt rules for road users and many speed cameras, so it’s usually bikers who are braking the rules and acting crazy. Most of bikers that got killed in my country in last year were bikers that went off the road by themselves (my guess is more then 60%). BMW GS is the most sold model in my market (>20.000$). BMW and Ducati are very strong here. Harley also. MV is very rare due to the weak sales and service network. Taking share from Ducati, BMW and Harley would be very hard tasl in short term.
Bikers like to get together and ride together, mostly for pleasure and fun. In some regions scuters are very strong because they are practical to move around but these people also buy motorcycles as a second bike to travel or go to the race track on the weekends.
So in general bikes are everywhere, they are part of the culture and dealers are growing each year. Only few brands don’t make it - like MV unfortunately.


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GS is not normally purchased by millennials, that I can assure you :smile2:

Last year I turned 30. I decided to rent a GS 1200 for a trip through the mountains of Lesotho (small mountain kingdom surrounded by South Africa). Riding the BMW through my neighborhood before the trip, I've never been greeted by so many old people before. Even some of my older neighbors went out their way to let out a way when they drove past and saw the GS. With my MV, its normally youngsters with their parents.
 

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Lots of assumptions in this thread. Fact is, there are lots of Panigales, Monsters, and Scramblers here in NYC. Using the passionate fanbase imo has always been the smartest attack to convert and retain new buyers. Education, excitement, assurance. Not impossible. I've convinced quite a few friends to buy an MV (none of mine lol) and they have all been happy.
 

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Lots of assumptions in this thread. Fact is, there are lots of Panigales, Monsters, and Scramblers here in NYC. Using the passionate fanbase imo has always been the smartest attack to convert and retain new buyers. Education, excitement, assurance. Not impossible. I've convinced quite a few friends to buy an MV (none of mine lol) and they have all been happy.
Word of mouth advertising is the best..........
 

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That's called "entitlement"
It's called good business........

I do wonder how well they will stand behind there out of warranty known issues such as starting issues and dropped values for the 3 cylinders. Will they look after their customers as they should or just pretend they don't exist?
 

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Sardarov's vision sounds very promising. However, I am reading it like this: Sardarov saw an opportunity to buy a globally recognized premium motorcycle brand (how many of those pop up on the market often?) for not a lot of euros. MV is a great brand with proud history. The company is in disarray but the doors are still open (unlike Bimota) and there is a small but still functioning dealer network.

"Not a passion, not love, not craziness. Business. Because only business sense will allow MV to flourish. Otherwise, it will die.”
This further underscores Sardarov's approach when it comest to MV - for him its an investment project as well as a vehicle of legitimacy. Sardarov is poised to make MV a success but for the purpose of selling a successful brand (or at least more successful than when he acquired it), making a solid profit and moving on to the next investment opportunity. Another upside is that his reputation will greatly benefit if MV is success and different, much more prominent doors will open for him and his family. After all its an investment, not a passion! I suspect the next MV owner will be more likely from China or India. This is just my take on it, no crystal balls were used in the process :wink2:
 

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Sardarov's vision sounds very promising. However, I am reading it like this: Sardarov saw an opportunity to buy a globally recognized premium motorcycle brand (how many of those pop up on the market often?) for not a lot of euros. MV is a great brand with proud history. The company is in disarray but the doors are still open (unlike Bimota) and there is a small but still functioning dealer network.



This further underscores Sardarov's approach when it comest to MV - for him its an investment project as well as a vehicle of legitimacy. Sardarov is poised to make MV a success but for the purpose of selling a successful brand (or at least more successful than when he acquired it), making a solid profit and moving on to the next investment opportunity. Another upside is that his reputation will greatly benefit if MV is success and different, much more prominent doors will open for him and his family. After all its an investment, not a passion! I suspect the next MV owner will be more likely from China or India. This is just my take on it, no crystal balls were used in the process :wink2:
Selling to Chinese wont give him the "street cred" he is looking for unfortunately. Indian company like Baja possibly, but they are tied in with KTM and Triumph.

The Chinese haven't been able to make successes of any of the Italian companies they have acquired IMHO. Benelli comes to mind.
 
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