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Good read thanks for sharing. I never really liked Sardarov, but after reading that I think my mind might have changed. Really glad he has Bordi on board to support him.
 

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This is a good article/interview. I applaud his honesty and determination to stabilizing and grow MV. As an MV owner knowing there is a realistic plan to keep the company in business means a lot to me. He (Timur) is playing with his own money and that is a great motivator to get it right, like he said there is no plan B.
I am one of his target customers. I have and love my Triumph and have recently checked out a BMW, and who doesn't like Ducati.
I had planned to purchase a new Street Triple, IMO, it is a better bike at a better price than the Brutale. I am going to wait on this for a bit and see what happens, plus my current Street Triple is just too good to let go.
His success is our gain.
 

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I wish I had the same optimism. I like the company being niche. Plus I do not see a lot of difference in the current models. I see them as having 3 types, naked, F3, and the superveloce as a stepchild between the two. I would love to see a new F4. 30,000 bikes a year is just too much. Sorry my rant is over.
 

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I don't see many bikers here on the east coast. Back 6 years ago there was a hot second trend to cafe-out as many vintage bikes as possible on the cheap, on the dirt dirt cheap. Then bike building became a trend, meaning stripping off the front fender, stripping paint, custom seat, etc and then say "I built that bike from the ground up." It was beyond laughable and embarrassing. Once the riders got their dreamy 'playmates' by speeding 45 mph around bar to bar the bikes were taken off the roads or sold. Its always I was a biker blah blah blah. too dangerous blah blah bah... Whatever. People rather spend money on restaurants and travel to gain life experiences and then lock their families up behind a flat-screen. Go Eagles! They buy experiences for the short gain, like ax throwing. Sorry in advance if I've offended anyone... well... not really. Rant over.

I think it's quaint he thinks millennials are his target. Good read nonetheless. Thanks for the link!
 

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I thought it was a good read. I was at my local dealer, Belleville Motorcycle Mall, last weekend who attended the Vegas event and he was VERY encouraged by what Timur had to say. Time will tell what will come of our beloved MV but in the meanwhile, we should stand behind our mark, continue to encourage new riders, maybe not the posers get our bikes out there on the road so the message can spread!
 

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2 salient quotes that caught my eye:

“MV Agusta behaved badly to everyone. Starting to its own employees, to its own suppliers, to its own clients, to our dealers, to every stakeholder interested in MV. I am surprised that we have a big community of loyal supporters and moto lovers, as Doug (McCloskey, CEO) call them, who still believe in it, believe in the brand. And for us it is a blessing that has happened. Because these things destroy brands. And there are a lot of examples of brands that never recover. But we still have the foundation of a fan base that continue to demand the product, continued to be excited, and now the time is to love them, to appreciate them, and to provide everything possible for them to recommend us to a friend. We want to be a product maker that if you ride your bike, people are jealous about it. Not, people are like, ‘Oh, you bought MV, what the f—k?’ "

“If you buy MV you want to be proud that you own MV, because you want to stand out. That’s why I am surprised that we still have 6,000 – 7,000 clients who own MV (in the U.S.), and we want to support them because we want the resale value of what they already own to go up."
 

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Then, he ought to reach out to us.....
 

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I wonder how many SCS owner will agree with this statement: "And the clutch lasts the life of the bike, and you can retrofit it with a kit. It lasts infinitely.”
 

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I'm wondering if they have made some improvements since initial launch??
 

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Good question, since I know there are threads in the TV section talking about clutch failures and the lack of support, and knowledge, from MV.
 

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Hey Balz! How about the cush drive issue?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I wish I had the same optimism. I like the company being niche. Plus I do not see a lot of difference in the current models. I see them as having 3 types, naked, F3, and the superveloce as a stepchild between the two. I would love to see a new F4. 30,000 bikes a year is just too much. Sorry my rant is over.
I think us old timers like the fact that MV Agusta is very niche - and we don't care if other riders question our sanity for riding an MV.
However, it is a fact that a certain volume of sale must be present for a company to make money and I believe that is not possible with less than 10,000 units. Unless the raised prices to a level where the margins would support the low volume, but I don't think anybody would be willing to pay $30,000 for a Brutale 800.
 

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"Not a passion, not love, not craziness. Business. Because only business sense will allow MV to flourish. Otherwise, it will die.”

Great article, think I am starting to get excited about MV again.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The main things I took away from the dealer conference:

1. Timur is approachable and you can have a good chat with him. Giovanni or Claudio were not.
2. Timur seems to be an open book. He does not hide or deny past or current problems like the Italians would. He makes it no secret that his family put up a lot of money to purchase MV and now it is on him to make it work.
3. He has a concrete plan that he following and the company and thus the employees have some direction. The Italians had dozens of plans, the "plan" seemed to change every year or so, and they were pointing in a bunch of different directions at the same time. I don't know for sure if Timor's plan will work out. Like his plan or not, at least everyone involved company execs, employees, distributors, and dealers have direction what to work towards, and if you don't agree you can get off the train.
4. Timur seems to be a doer not just a talker. He clearly laid out the work he did behind the scenes during his first year, i.e. re-establish supplier relations, and fix the supply chain. It was completely effed up and hardly any suppliers wanted to do business with MV anymore. Makes sense to me to have that in place before pushing on the sales side which is the part that is more visible to you and I. Now he is moving forward with the sales side. New organization in the US, new product plans are in place, marketing plans are being formulated, some of it already starting to be executed. What I like, while it may not be perfect, at least things are moving and stuff is getting done. With the Italians, it was always talk, talk, talk; blah, blah, blah, and nothing ever got done.
5. Timur looks at a problem from many different angles and often from a way that is unorthodox in the traditional motorcycle industry way. I like that! The consumers have changed A LOT. I see that in the 20 years since I owned a dealership. Completely different demands and expectations. I understand what he is saying about the Millennials. I don't really understand that generation and what makes them tick. But I can see his argument that it is not that the Millennials will not buy motorcycles. But Millennials have to be sold on motorcycles in a different way. They are looking for different attributes in a product than our generations. Most of us were all about the mechanical aspects of the bike, horse power, weight, 0-60, top speed, etc. The Millennials may not care about that, but you may be able to capture them with other attributes like ease of use (an SCS clutch makes it almost as easy as a scooter), digital connectivity with other riders to share their experiences (that's what they do on video games all day long) when we old guys go riding to get away form everyone, etc. A good product alone is not enough, people nowadays are looking to buy a compete experience, the product providing the experience is just the tool to get there.
I don't know if his approach will work but at least he is trying something different. The downward spiral the MC industry is in, is proof that the traditional way no longer works!
 
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