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Discussion Starter #3
Apparently Superbike Planet thinks otherwise, but *I'd* call the Gilera the original Italian legend... it was essentially a Gilera motor that put MV in the record books.
 

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emmvee said:
Apparently Superbike Planet thinks otherwise, but *I'd* call the Gilera the original Italian legend... it was essentially a Gilera motor that put MV in the record books.
While true, and yes, the engine design was a ripoff... Who actually did the racing and the hard work? Gilera essentially disappeared after the ban of superchargers from what I understand, true? Gilera is the older marque and started racing earlier, but I'm not sure about this "legend" stuff.

You could make the same argument for Alfa and Ferarri, if you're into that type of thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Piero Remor, chief engineer at Gilera, was hired by MV then continued development on the motor there. Much the same as Tamburini's coming from Ducati in the present day and producing a newer rendition of an existing design.

Gilera dropped out of GP racing after 1957 along with all the other major Italian manufacturers - leaving MV alone in that arena to battle the English marques and their outdated motors. The supercharger ban was well prior to that.

As far as "doing the racing and the hard work" I'm not sure what you mean there. Gilera won 500cc GP titles well before MV.

And as far as the legend stuff goes, I could care less. It's just a reference to the Superbike Planet article as some might find it an interesting read.
 

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Yes MV and GILERA had done a lot in the italian racing légend, but it's difficult to forget MOTO GUZZI that won more laurels than anyone else, the "bicilindrica" before war, the three and four cylinders layouts, and the marvelous V8 were not "merry go round hardware".
I love MVs but its history began at the beginnig of the forties, GUZZI first 500 OHC was lauched in 1924.
 

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emmvee said:
Piero Remor, chief engineer at Gilera, was hired by MV then continued development on the motor there. Much the same as Tamburini's coming from Ducati in the present day and producing a newer rendition of an existing design.
To be accurate, Tamburini didn't come from Ducati. Cagiva bought Ducati in the mid 80's and Tamburini came from Bimota to work for Cagiva. When Cagiva sold Ducati Tamburini remained at CRC, where incidentally a gent named Pierre Terblance worked for him. Terblance left CRC in '96 to work for Ducati where he designed the 999.
 

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Koop said:
To be accurate, Tamburini didn't come from Ducati. Cagiva bought Ducati in the mid 80's and Tamburini came from Bimota to work for Cagiva. When Cagiva sold Ducati Tamburini remained at CRC, where incidentally a gent named Pierre Terblance worked him. Terblance left CRC in '96 to work for Ducati where he designed the 999.
Koop, great info buddy, thanks for all that
 

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Discussion Starter #9
GTW36 said:
Yes MV and GILERA had done a lot in the italian racing légend, but it's difficult to forget MOTO GUZZI that won more laurels than anyone else, the "bicilindrica" before war, the three and four cylinders layouts, and the marvelous V8 were not "merry go round hardware".
I love MVs but its history began at the beginnig of the forties, GUZZI first 500 OHC was lauched in 1924.
Very good! Yes, many wins by Moto Guzzi before MV ever built bike #1.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Koop said:
To be accurate, Tamburini didn't come from Ducati. Cagiva bought Ducati in the mid 80's and Tamburini came from Bimota to work for Cagiva. When Cagiva sold Ducati Tamburini remained at CRC, where incidentally a gent named Pierre Terblance worked him. Terblance left CRC in '96 to work for Ducati where he designed the 999.
Quite true. I was using "Ducati" in the conversational sense as few know about the distinction between Ducati and Cagiva and even fewer care. But good point!
 

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I must have been thinking of some other marque that quit when superchargers were banned... And I think they were banned in about 1939 or 40? I'm way off on my Gilera knowledge... Maybe it was BMW I was thinking of.
 

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Guzzi, the second oldest brand (1921) that has never closed its doors or gone out of business! Still in the original factory on lake Como!!!

Name the oldest company.....(easy)
 

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Umm... Indian? No, no... Crocker? No, that's not it.... Excelsior? Damn... What is that other one?
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
The supercharger ban came just after WWII and it was enacted because of pressure by the British makers whose bikes couldn't keep up with those of the Italians. And you thought AMA/DORNA etc shenanigans were something new? ;) And yes, I think it was BMW that dropped out, but I'm not a huge student of GP racing so corrections are welcome.

What I do know is the Italians got their more modern bikes (including those with high-revving fours) to make serious power and dominated even without the superchargers.

It is said that Moto-Guzzi, Gilera, Mondial and Ducati dropped out because they thought they weren't getting enough sales to justify all the money they were spending just to beat each other and left MV alone to dominate. Personally, I think it was because the post-war economy in Italy was picking up and people were buying cars (even if they were tiny Fiats) instead of motorcycles.

So (heresy alert) with all the other Italians out of competition, MV got the chance to rack up a bunch - but certainly not all - of their championships somewhat uncontested in the years when the British bikes were no longer competitive and before the Japanese developed to the point they could compete.

If you get a chance, take a look at a pic of the old Gilera motors. Pretty much identical to the MV's that are more well-known, at least to today's fans and riders.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
airfuel said:
Guzzi, the second oldest brand (1921) that has never closed its doors or gone out of business! Still in the original factory on lake Como!!!

Name the oldest company.....(easy)
Hint: You seen one, you've heard 'em all.
 
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