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Discussion Starter #1
I just purchased a 2005 Tamburini and am wondering if anyone has any information on how the velocity air stacks work?
 

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Welcome aboard, that’s a very casual first post.
I am sure the experts will be along soon to answer your query.
As in understand it, a solenoid increases the height of the inner velocity stack at a particular rpm to shorten the effective intake length. Much like a tuned exhaust, but on the intake side.
 

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Welcome. Pics when you can.
 

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Welcome to the family....another jealous man here. The Tambo is the bike to buy if you can.

I also wonder what number, and where are you, and did you get all the extras that originally came with it (like the certificate?)?
 

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Welcome to the forum.

Here's a Youtube video of the system in operation.


Here's an article about the TSS by Kevin Cameron

TSS, Intake tract trickery

Variable-length intakes such as the MV Tamburini's Torque Shift System make us think of Formula One or of the last of the racing Mercedes 300SLRs, but the concept is useful wherever engine torque must be maximized across a range of rpm.

First, some physics. When a piston drops on its intake stroke, a deep vacuum of about half an atmosphere is immediately created in the intake tract. This propagates from the piston crown toward the intake's open end—the bellmouth—at the local speed of sound (fast!). When it reaches the end, atmospheric pressure rushes in to fill that partial vacuum, creating a reflected pressure pulse that crashes back down the intake pipe as a wave toward the valves. If our wave returns to the cylinder just before the intake valves close, the pressure in that wave will be added to the pressure in the cylinder, making a denser charge that equals higher combustion pressure and increased torque.

Often there is not room on a motorcycle for intake pipes of the necessary length, so the designer will allow the intake wave to make two or more trips up and down a shorter intake pipe. Each reflection of the waves loses some of its intensity, but compromises are the engineer's stock in trade.

By using an intake pipe of ideal length for the desired rpm, a torque gain of the order of 10 percent may be achieved—but only across a limited rpm range. To have both a robust midrange (the Tamburini's peak torque on the CW dyno comes at 8700 rpm) and strong top end calls for having two different intake lengths. This is just what TSS delivers. The MV's four throttle bodies have short, permanent bellmouths suited to top-end power, but a set of moveable extension bellmouths is carried on a pair of linear bearings. Below 10,000 rpm, these extensions are in place, creating a longer intake tract that boosts torque. Above 10,000 revs, a Pierburg pneumatic actuator (run on engine vacuum) snaps the extensions up and out of the way, shortening the intake tract to boost breathing and thus power on the top end. This is a two-state system—it is not progressive—as the extensions are moved in or out of use within 0.15 of a second.

Because the change of intake length is carried out at an rpm between peak torque and peak power, where the engine's torque is less dependent upon intake length, torque at the "shift" point does not change greatly.

A similar two-state variable intake length system was used in Superbike racing by Honda on later RC45s, but this does not violate MV's claim that TSS is a first for a production motorcycle.
 

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Thanks for that John!
 

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Yes, thank you! I've seen that video before but with the accompanying text I now understand better as to what's going on.
 

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Well done John.
For interests sake the Veltro and the F4CC also have the torque shift system.
I once ran my Tamburini on a dyno and there was a associated lift in hp around the 10,000 rpm range that indicated that the system does function as intended.
 

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Welcome to the forum.

Here's a Youtube video of the system in operation.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XxF90-nr5Xg

Here's an article about the TSS by Kevin Cameron

TSS, Intake tract trickery

Variable-length intakes such as the MV Tamburini's Torque Shift System make us think of Formula One or of the last of the racing Mercedes 300SLRs, but the concept is useful wherever engine torque must be maximized across a range of rpm.

First, some physics. When a piston drops on its intake stroke, a deep vacuum of about half an atmosphere is immediately created in the intake tract. This propagates from the piston crown toward the intake's open end—the bellmouth—at the local speed of sound (fast!). When it reaches the end, atmospheric pressure rushes in to fill that partial vacuum, creating a reflected pressure pulse that crashes back down the intake pipe as a wave toward the valves. If our wave returns to the cylinder just before the intake valves close, the pressure in that wave will be added to the pressure in the cylinder, making a denser charge that equals higher combustion pressure and increased torque.

Often there is not room on a motorcycle for intake pipes of the necessary length, so the designer will allow the intake wave to make two or more trips up and down a shorter intake pipe. Each reflection of the waves loses some of its intensity, but compromises are the engineer's stock in trade.

By using an intake pipe of ideal length for the desired rpm, a torque gain of the order of 10 percent may be achieved—but only across a limited rpm range. To have both a robust midrange (the Tamburini's peak torque on the CW dyno comes at 8700 rpm) and strong top end calls for having two different intake lengths. This is just what TSS delivers. The MV's four throttle bodies have short, permanent bellmouths suited to top-end power, but a set of moveable extension bellmouths is carried on a pair of linear bearings. Below 10,000 rpm, these extensions are in place, creating a longer intake tract that boosts torque. Above 10,000 revs, a Pierburg pneumatic actuator (run on engine vacuum) snaps the extensions up and out of the way, shortening the intake tract to boost breathing and thus power on the top end. This is a two-state system—it is not progressive—as the extensions are moved in or out of use within 0.15 of a second.

Because the change of intake length is carried out at an rpm between peak torque and peak power, where the engine's torque is less dependent upon intake length, torque at the "shift" point does not change greatly.

A similar two-state variable intake length system was used in Superbike racing by Honda on later RC45s, but this does not violate MV's claim that TSS is a first for a production motorcycle.
Now that is beautiful! Thanks.

And welcome to the new member.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thank You for sending that info. I have a 2007 f-4 R-1000, Whie & Black. I just purchased a Tamburini 2005 a few months ago, # 256.

Thanks again Martynnmv WishI new how to post pics of my bikes.
 

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Thank You for sending that info. I have a 2007 f-4 R-1000, Whie & Black. I just purchased a Tamburini 2005 a few months ago, # 256.

Thanks again Martynnmv WishI new how to post pics of my bikes.
Only your second post since April !?!

After you have 3 posts in this section you can post anywhere. To post photos scroll down on the page to "Go Advanced"... within there you can "Manage Attachments"
 

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@martynnmv, @esq'z me: Posting pictures is not post dependent. As long as the post is in the introduction section for the first three posts, you can post pictures from post one. Many have.

You can simply open your picture file and drag and drop to the box below the MESSAGE BOX, or you can go through the GO ADVANCED>MANAGE ATTACHMENTS>CHOOSE FILE>UPLOAD protocol. The you click on the PAPERCLIP ICON and follow the prompts.
 
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