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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so I got my new battery this morning and decided to get the bike started. Drained the gas the other day (inside of the tank looks good) and put fresh gas in with some sea foam since the bike has been sitting. Good news is the dash turns on, found out the bike has 135 miles on it, bad news is the bike won’t start. Fuel pump primes, bike cranks but won’t start. I’m not at all familiar with modern bikes and have 0 experience in MV, my other 8 bikes are Harleys ranging from 1947 to 1993 so they have almost no electronics. The bike has been sitting for about 2.5 years with fuel in the tank. My initial thought is to check the spark plugs and the injectors. Good idea or should I go a different route? This may be a stupid question but I just don’t know where to begin on this. Other then that it has been great to stare at cause it is absolutely the most beautiful bike I have ever owned. I had a 2004 998S FE that I thought looked great back in 2006 but this is even better. Thanks for any guidance.
 

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First thing to check is batter voltage while the engine is cranking.
There is a low voltage cut-out built into the ECU for electronics protection.

Second thing to check is as above. There is a propensity for the fuel line to pop off the fuel pump discharge, either at the pump, or at the plate penetration....more likely at the pump. This is due to hose swelling and poor friction at the connection. Those hoses and fuel filter should be replaced.

Once those thing are verified, we can delve deeper...

Do you have the Workshop Manuals for your bike?

Font Parallel Auto part Circle Automotive lighting
 

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Old Wing Nut
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I second the fuel hose inspection/replacement. Easy enough to take the tank off and remove the pump. Based on the low miles and length of time sitting with stale gas that is the first place to go.
Chuck (silentservice) can help with the pieces you will need....a new pump plate o-ring being mandatory
 
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Back to the battery — it’s important to charge new batteries a good day or so in advance of first use. After use a battery specific battery conditioner/trickle charger is a must as a daily habit. Make sure your cables are cleaned and connected correctly including the engine ground. In line from your battery in the solenoid with a 40amp fuse. Check the cables for a secure fit, proper fuse installment and clean connections. This is basic stuff needed for power which should be tended to anyway. And yes test your battery as Chuck mentioned after proper care is given. Keep in mind older bikes are much different so you’ll have to modify your electrical care/requirements.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
First thing to check is batter voltage while the engine is cranking.
There is a low voltage cut-out built into the ECU for electronics protection.

Second thing to check is as above. There is a propensity for the fuel line to pop off the fuel pump discharge, either at the pump, or at the plate penetration....more likely at the pump. This is due to hose swelling and poor friction at the connection. Those hoses and fuel filter should be replaced.

Once those thing are verified, we can delve deeper...

Do you have the Workshop Manuals for your bike?

View attachment 495948
Thanks for the info. Someone was kind enough to post a link to the manuals for the bike on my introduction thread. I will try and get the tank off today after work .
 

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siphon the gas out before removing the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Am I looking at this correctly? I have to take the front fairing, tanks, air box and seat off to get to the spark plugs? Seams like the issue is stale gas, I syphoned the gas out of the tank but I think there was gas sitting in the lines or wherever and most likely soaked the plugs. You can smell bad gas smell out of the exhaust, so hopefully the injectors are fine but just not getting spark since the plugs are flooded with stake gas. I will take them out and replace them as soon as I can make the time to disassemble half of a motorcycle to get to them. I'll tell you what this is nothing like working on a 70 year old Harley lol.
 

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The airbox does have to come off, and with the ram air runners coming from the front fairing into the airbox, that means it must also come off.....but it is all very easy to do.
A quick note...read up on front turn signal contacts at mirror base. There are locating pins that require a bit of care not to break and the signals will not work if the mounting bolt on the cover is overtightened.

The fuel tank can be removed without taking off the airbox....so check the pump and hoses first.
 

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You have to take the seat off to get the fuel tank off. You have to take the fuel tank off to get the airbox off. The airbox comes off when the air tubes are removed and that happens after teh nose is off.
That whole process is less than 30 minutes.
There are some keys thought: Ensure you follow the instructions for removing the nose. Loosen the mirror mount nuts as they say to do. There are locating tabs at the bottom of the mirror stalks that can be broken off if not manipulated with care. Those tabs relocate the nose so that the electrical signal for the turn signals passes cleanly through a very ingenious electrical plate.
Keep in mind that this is a Tamburini and shortcuts should not be taken. Handle those parts with care as they are unobtanium.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Good thing I work at a multi line dealership that also carries Ducati, Aprilia, BMW and a few others instead of just HD, because I got myself a little over my head on this bike and the mechanics are willing to help me out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You guys were right, it wasn’t that difficult. A little tedious but pretty straight forward. Getting spark, plugs were fouled. Looks like it’s not getting fuel. Gonna check the injectors next. Half the bike on the table. Here’s a bunch of pictures that have nothing to do with the plugs but show some cool parts.
Motor vehicle Automotive design Automotive exterior Bumper Gas

Vehicle Motorcycle Odometer Automotive lighting Automotive tire

Vehicle Motor vehicle Automotive tire Automotive design Automotive exterior

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Automotive design Fuel tank

Vehicle Automotive tire Automotive lighting Hood Automotive design

Tire Wheel Fuel tank Automotive lighting Vehicle

Light Motor vehicle Automotive tire Automotive wheel system Gas

Hood Motor vehicle Automotive design Yellow Automotive exterior
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Anyone have any idea how to remove these? I can’t find any info in the manual unless I’m looking in the wrong place. I’m trying to get to the injectors so I can remove them and have them cleaned.
Light Motor vehicle Automotive tire Automotive wheel system Gas
 

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TSS System.petty simple once you see it apart,

Have you pulled the pump out of the tank yet? That should be the very first thing you do. New hoses, filter and inspect the pump,
 
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TSS System.petty simple once you see it apart,

Have you pulled the pump out of the tank yet? That should be the very first thing you do. New hoses, filter and inspect the pump,
… and, new hoses must be of type “submersible”, not just common fuel hoses.
 
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