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My point is if I have a tool called a 'ride height measuring tool' I expect it to accurately measure ride height, quite simply this tool doesn't do what it says on the tin.
Actually it does. It measures ride height based on a certain "standard" in the same way a thermometer measures temperature, with an arbitrary reference (say zero centigrade). Does a thermometer not measure temperature because it isn't referenced to absolute zero? Does a thermometer not do what it says on the tin if it measures degrees F, rankine or kelvin?
 

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Frankine? Who's Frankine? You mean that ex SNL idiot who's now a member of Congress? Or is it Senate. Doesn't matter, they all suck.
 

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Frankine? Who's Frankine? You mean that ex SNL idiot who's now a member of Congress? Or is it Senate. Doesn't matter, they all suck.
Rankine:

Rankine is a thermodynamic (absolute) temperature scale named after the British engineer and physicist William John Macquorn Rankine, who proposed it in 1859.

The symbol is R (or Ra if necessary to distinguish it from the Rømer and Réaumur scales). Occasionally this is written °R, but as with the Kelvin scale the usage of the degree symbol is incorrect. Zero on both the Kelvin and Rankine scales is absolute zero, but the Rankine degree is defined as equal to one degree Fahrenheit, rather than the one degree Celsius used by the Kelvin scale. A temperature of −459.67 °F is exactly equal to 0 R.

A few engineering fields in the U.S. measure thermodynamic temperature using the Rankine scale. However, throughout the scientific world where measurements are made in SI units, thermodynamic temperature is measured in Kelvin.
 

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Ride height affects various aspects of geometry. If I gave your 2 F4s one fitted with a 190/50 tyre and the other fitted with a 190/55 and asked you to set the ride height to factory spec +5mm those two bikes would roll out your shop sitting at two different heights. Call me old fashioned, but that doesn't seem right.

where is the banging my head against a wall smilie?

For the hard of reading, the tyre size does not come into the equation on this particular bike when measuring the ride height with this tool. HOWEVER!!!!!!! using the ride height measuring tool is only to get you started. You then ride the bike and provide feedback to someone or to yourself and make the required changes.

In your example yes the tyre has an effect, BUT!! the rider has to take responsibility for offering feedback to someone like me, plus difference like that will be felt and spotted, call me old fashioned but i speak to my customers and set thigns up for them and not to what i have written down from racign 2 years ago.

Is that really that hard to understand.

To use your own example, when you set your tyres at 34psi or whatever i bet you'll check with your own gauge as gauges can all differ. But if you stick with your own one you at least know that you'll always be somewhere similar. Now bacuase you have used a known measurment i.e. PSI you can at least tell a friend who asks for advice a good place to start. If you used a big pink balloon attached to the valve and a stop watch to work out how quickly it inflated then whatever information you got whilst possibly being more accurate for you would in fact be utter gibberish for anyone else.

Shit man, even rulers aren't exact. Why are hankering on to the point that this tool should somehow be a calibrated tool for specific measurments.

For the last time it is a device that allows the rear ride height to be measured in a fairly repeatable way. No it is not 100% repeatable to a micron but it's good enough to get within 1mm every time. The tool gives the user thechance to set their bike to a starting point and then make changes by measuring this change using their fancy new tool.

1 or 2mm difference would be hard to feel from a road rider but 5mm would be very noticable. changes of 2mm are race track stuff, changes off 5mm are road rider areas.
 

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where is the banging my head against a wall smilie?

For the hard of reading, the tyre size does not come into the equation on this particular bike when measuring the ride height with this tool. HOWEVER!!!!!!! using the ride height measuring tool is only to get you started. You then ride the bike and provide feedback to someone or to yourself and make the required changes.

In your example yes the tyre has an effect, BUT!! the rider has to take responsibility for offering feedback to someone like me, plus difference like that will be felt and spotted, call me old fashioned but i speak to my customers and set thigns up for them and not to what i have written down from racign 2 years ago.

Is that really that hard to understand.

To use your own example, when you set your tyres at 34psi or whatever i bet you'll check with your own gauge as gauges can all differ. But if you stick with your own one you at least know that you'll always be somewhere similar. Now bacuase you have used a known measurment i.e. PSI you can at least tell a friend who asks for advice a good place to start. If you used a big pink balloon attached to the valve and a stop watch to work out how quickly it inflated then whatever information you got whilst possibly being more accurate for you would in fact be utter gibberish for anyone else.

Shit man, even rulers aren't exact. Why are hankering on to the point that this tool should somehow be a calibrated tool for specific measurments.

For the last time it is a device that allows the rear ride height to be measured in a fairly repeatable way. No it is not 100% repeatable to a micron but it's good enough to get within 1mm every time. The tool gives the user thechance to set their bike to a starting point and then make changes by measuring this change using their fancy new tool.

1 or 2mm difference would be hard to feel from a road rider but 5mm would be very noticable. changes of 2mm are race track stuff, changes off 5mm are road rider areas.
Believe it or not, despite your ranting, I actually understand what you are trying to say. I don't agree with much of your logic nor the way it which it's presented but I do understand it.

However, I'm not overly convinced you understand the point I'm trying to make but hey ho, I'm over it.
 

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Frankine? Who's Frankine? You mean that ex SNL idiot who's now a member of Congress? Or is it Senate. Doesn't matter, they all suck.
I think he meant F'n Rankled.....people are getting all bent out of shape over the understanding of a repeatable reference point...this is the point from the top of the center of the rear hub, as referenced off the top of the factory stand as situated inside the rear hub, to the top of the "Ride Height Measuring Tool". Yes, many things actually affect the distance from the top of the seat to the ground...or, conversely the bottom of the bike to the ground...depending on your view point; but, the "tool", whatever you'd like to call it, simply gives you a repeatable starting point from which to make your adjustments. Now, just what happens if we use a different stand....:jsm:
 

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I think he meant F'n Rankled.....people are getting all bent out of shape over the understanding of a repeatable reference point...this is the point from the top of the center of the rear hub, as referenced off the top of the factory stand as situated inside the rear hub, to the top of the "Ride Height Measuring Tool". Yes, many things actually affect the distance from the top of the seat to the ground...or, conversely the bottom of the bike to the ground...depending on your view point; but, the "tool", whatever you'd like to call it, simply gives you a repeatable starting point from which to make your adjustments. Now, just what happens if we use a different stand....:jsm:
You are out of luck if you don't use the factory stand, since that is the standard.
 

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Rob- You're worse than I am, and I'm pretty bad. Anyway to all those of you who have posted I thank you very much for the input to my original question. You think they'll ever get to absolute zero? Super conductors here we come.

I've been on two Duc forums and this one. The level and depth of intelligence (not you Randy) on here is vastly superior to any others. Also the willingness and patience to explain things. Good good bunch.
 

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This is sort of close (all relative of course before we start all over :stickpoke) - a piece of rhodium metal was cooled to 100 pK, or 0.000 000 000 1 degrees above absolute zero. The absolute zero is the limit of all temperatures, -273.15 °C, a temperature one can never reach....... (Helsinki Uni BTW) :smoking:
 

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:freezing:Absolute zero= the temperature at which molecular motion ceases.:freezing:
 

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Absolute zero. The temperature in our bedroom last night after my wife read some of the emails I get.
 

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PM sent inquiring about ride height tool.
Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #55
Pm

Ed;
reply sent

Noel-theknurl
 

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Mr Knurl, howdy. I'm bringing my '04 F4 750 S Brutale out for a trot on our local track. Loving the bike prep almost as much as I will the day at the track. I'm looking to secure an rear suspension set tool 800093347 / equivalent ;) shipped here in Adelaide, South Australia. Did you do the batch? Any left? Curious about if viable to ship here. Look forward to hearing from you.
Kind regards
Brendan
 

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Discussion Starter #57
This was 11 years ago 😆👍👍
 
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