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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have now got via Design Corse the socket to remove rear wheel nut & also a heavy duty torque wrench.
I want to check the torque on my hub nut & wheel nut, which begs the question - which side is the most critical for damage due to over tightening.
ie. the nut that holds the rear wheel oh the right side or the nut on the left side of swing arm, or both equally.
It was your message Eddy on the 12k service thread that made me think on this, I guess I assumed it was the wheel side that was the one most at risk from over tightening. Now I see the hub side must still be at the factory setting as the bike has only had 1k & 6 k service, & a new set of tires.
 

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Neither are as critical as the hub cap screws! Basically you are taking up the clearances in the assembly, putting enough pre-tension in the sprocket side to keep the assembly together due to axial forces and putting enough pre-tension on the threads to stop the nut(s) coming loose. So the sprocket side is where you should torque up, wheel side not so critical.
 

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Neither are as critical as the hub cap screws! Basically you are taking up the clearances in the assembly, putting enough pre-tension in the sprocket side to keep the assembly together due to axial forces and putting enough pre-tension on the threads to stop the nut(s) coming loose. So the sprocket side is where you should torque up, wheel side not so critical.
Shaun's spot on ...On my project F4 I haven't torqued up the sprocket nut yet and there is a little axial play in the assembly. This is to be expected as I haven't taken up the end to end clearances as engineered by design,

The wheel nut holds the wheel in place. Tightening either of these nuts does not preload the bearings.

The hub pinch bolts ( x2 ) however, are not to be overtightened or they can crush/stress the wheel side 2Row ball bearing and compromise it. ie Fcuk it up for want of a better expression.

joe
 

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I have now got via Design Corse the socket to remove rear wheel nut & also a heavy duty torque wrench.
I want to check the torque on my hub nut & wheel nut, which begs the question - which side is the most critical for damage due to over tightening.
ie. the nut that holds the rear wheel oh the right side or the nut on the left side of swing arm, or both equally.
It was your message Eddy on the 12k service thread that made me think on this, I guess I assumed it was the wheel side that was the one most at risk from over tightening. Now I see the hub side must still be at the factory setting as the bike has only had 1k & 6 k service, & a new set of tires.
Mate,all the nuts are critical,if the wheel nut is loose,the wheel rim will move on the carrier.If the sprocket side nut is loose the needle bearing ring can spin and cause rapid wear.Pinch bolts overtensioned can put too much load on the wheel side bearing.For piece of mind check them all.Torque the pinch bolts at the lower value 28nm.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Aha, now I feel foolish telling the mechanic not to over tighten my wheel nut, oh well they must get used to it.
So from what you are saying I should probably just forget about the hub and let them check it at the appropriate service. I want to remove my rear wheel to tidy up my hunger bolts so I will torque nut appropriately but now realise this has nought to do with hub failures. (I think)
Thanks guys.
Oops just saw Mitchys commen. re-think all. I need to look up what the pinch bolts are now.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks Mitchy, had a look in the manuals but still in the dark on what's a Pinch Bolt.
 

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pinch bolts?

Jon;
the pinch bolts are the 2, 10mm Allen bolts at the rear of the swing arm.....there is a sticky on the swingarm that says 28-32 Nm

i use less torque
i also have Mitch hubs in both my MVs

28Nm = 20.65 lb/ft, i have posted what that does to a stock hub

i use 15 lb/ft, i'm old and have been doing this stuff for a long time.....
THIS IS MY DECISION
i'm not telling you to do it

try this, tighten 1 pinch bolt to 14Nm and try to rotate the hub:naughty:

no, Godzilla couldn't rotate it either

:drummer:
 

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too tight?

You've got a damn good point there! I HATE crap that's overtightened! :thewife:
i worked on 2, 312s in the last month

straight from the dealerships (2 different ones)

the pinch bolts were too tight do undo with a 3/8" SnapOn ratchet:wtf::wtf::wtf:
stock torque is ~20 lb/ft......they were over 100 lb/ft

the wheel nuts were probably at 250 lb/ft.....i use an air impact:naughty:
correctly torqued the impact hits it 2 or 3 times......these took 5 seconds of hammering:jsm:
 

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so am I correct that I should loosen and retorque these bolts on my just purchased 800 brutale? I've heard about the hub failures over all these years and I know from the factory things are frequently way overtorqued.

Also, just to make sure. on my 910S the rear wheel nut was reverse ie LH threads. Is this the case on the B3 800 AND is the sprocket nut also a reverse thread???

Thanks

Pinch bolts- 28nm
Wheel side nut- 240nm
Sprocket side nut- 220nm
Grease threads on nuts.
 

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so am I correct that I should loosen and retorque these bolts on my just purchased 800 brutale? I've heard about the hub failures over all these years and I know from the factory things are frequently way overtorqued.

Also, just to make sure. on my 910S the rear wheel nut was reverse ie LH threads. Is this the case on the B3 800 AND is the sprocket nut also a reverse thread???

Thanks
Hi Chris
You guys need to not confuse the issue's here. Two completely different hubs in those bikes mate, the 800 should not have the same problems as the pre-2009 bikes.

The wheel nuts are the same reverse thread method. The sprocket nut is not.

Although I don't have the new 800 Workshop manuals yet, if you look at the F3 manuals you can learn from there.
 

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thanks for clearing that up Donsy!
Chris

Hi Chris
You guys need to not confuse the issue's here. Two completely different hubs in those bikes mate, the 800 should not have the same problems as the pre-2009 bikes.

The wheel nuts are the same reverse thread method. The sprocket nut is not.

Although I don't have the new 800 Workshop manuals yet, if you look at the F3 manuals you can learn from there.
 

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Timely this thread resurrection, checked my F4 bearings on the weekend - I do it at 3k intervals - they are smooth and perfect, repacked with grease (hub service I guess you could call it) and - as per Noel's instructions correct torque, make sure the chain tension is perfectly (& manically) within spec and off we go until next time, I still have the original hub and bearings at 24000 klms! I will check the bearings again at 27K and even if they seem ok will change them at 30k along with my chain & sprockets, whether they need it or not. I think a lot can be said for correct and exacting maintenance - I guess I have been lucky to not have had any cowboys working on my bike, either lucky or managed it well. I also keep my wheels showroom clean and check for any tell tale signs after every ride of possible bearing wear via appearance of metal shavings etc. I do accept that this kind of regimented maintenace level is too much for most people to bear.

If the hub does give me a problem, I'll switch over to a Mitchy's hub for sure having seen one in real life.

I still have the original plastic fuel connectors & no problem - it is amazing how a well maintained bike, looked after by caring/careful technicans doesn't give you problems ;)
 

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Good on you Rob,keep it up mate.Regular maintainance is the way to go.:)
 

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Good on you Rob,keep it up mate.Regular maintainance is the way to go.:)
Cheers Mitchy, I think the fact that my bike hasn't seen a drop of water in its life (neither riding nor washing) has helped it also. I do understand not all bikes can have an anally retentive and obsessive owners :laughing:

Still there is no substitute for regular maintenace - I reckon that hub of yours would go 100k on one set of bearings in my hands, :drummer: Excellent engineering, I don't think I've ever got the chance to commend you on it - well done mate. :)
 
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