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As I explained in an earlier post, I had been advised by an MV dealer Service Manager that the main reason for the consistent failure of the rear brake was due to an MV design flaw. The flaw being the master cylinder too close to the exhaust and, consequently, failing due to excessive heat buildup. I was advised to make a heat shield. Really?

Last weekend I decided to check this out. After a nice high speed run in 100F+ weather, I stopped the bike and checked the nice decorative black heat shield covering the exhaust. It was pretty warm but by no means capable of boiling brake fluid. I could also put my fingers on the cylinder without bodily damage. The cyclinder is partially protected by means of the exhaust pipe shield. As well, there is a comfortable air space between the cylinder and the shield and the shield and the exhaust.

I call BS on this claim.
 

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You are correct. For reference, flesh burns at 130 degrees F and most brake fluids have a boiling point well above 300 degrees.
Now, go move your reservoir above the ABS system and let physics work for you!
FYI, there is a st my thread in the 3 cylinder maintenance section that discusses this in depth.
 
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I don't think they boil the brake fluid when at speed. Like overheating of the bikes, I think the most damage is done in stop and go traffic and waiting at lights.
 

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Andrew, it’s a fallacy
 

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Try riding at slow speeds (20-25 mph) when first getting on the bike and using the back brake (only) to activate the ABS system which typically purges the air within the ABS system.

Since having the TSB done for the rear brake and using this method I've not had any repeat rear brake issues. North American MV rep provided this direction to me directly after the TSB completed for poor rear brake performance.
 

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Try riding at slow speeds (20-25 mph) when first getting on the bike and using the back brake (only) to activate the ABS system which typically purges the air within the ABS system.

Since having the TSB done for the rear brake and using this method I've not had any repeat rear brake issues. North American MV rep provided this direction to me directly after the TSB completed for poor rear brake performance.
Now that is interesting and I will try. Had a successful rear brake bleed by my mechanic last week. So far, none of the bleeds have lasted more than six months.
 

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Now that is interesting and I will try. Had a successful rear brake bleed by my mechanic last week. So far, none of the bleeds have lasted more than six months.
This was the pattern on my '16 Turismo.
Finally I bypassed the rear abs circuit.
By installing a new brake line from master cylinder to caliper.
 

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The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again expecting a different result....

 

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Now that is interesting and I will try. Had a successful rear brake bleed by my mechanic last week. So far, none of the bleeds have lasted more than six months.
I also had to have my ABS rear brake system bled twice and after the second time is when I got this direction from the NA MV Rep. He indicated that activating it at onset early during every ride should ensure that air does not collect in the ABS system. Has worked for me so far and it has been several years and thousands of miles..
 

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This was the pattern on my '16 Turismo.
Finally I bypassed the rear abs circuit.
By installing a new brake line from master cylinder to caliper.
Have you attempted to test the front ABS system for compliance since?

No problems with the ABS light on the dash at all?
 
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