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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry for the long post, I'm going to assume some of you nerds like this kind of thing though

So I'm trying to figure out which bike to get next. I currently have a vintage Triumph that I LOVE, more than I even thought I would. It seems like I'm still learning the intricacies of that bike a year later, e.g. exactly when to shift after pulling in the clutch so that it doesn't miss the gear.

I bought an old Triumph because I started to have a bad taste about all the modern classic bikes, and even though modern Triumphs are amazing machines, it just seemed more fun to get the original, real thing. My main reason for telling you this is to show that I'm mainly a motorcycle enthusiast. I've never really owned or ridden a sport bike, and for the most part I go on a few rides per week just for fun. I don't like to tear up corners or go super fast.

BUT, I'm obsessed with MV Agusta and the history of sport bikes. I've considered almost every new MV they have besides the ones that cost as much as a small house but I'm leaning now towards getting an original F4 750 for the same reason I got an original Triumph. Well not exactly the same reason, but why not get the thing that started it all? And also, an F4 1000 really would be overkill for me

My big question is this: Would a bike like that really be fun for around town or just short fun rides on b roads? Obviously part of owning a bike like that is just owning it, and I definitely have some of that, but I don't want to own a bike just to look at it. It seems like overkill for what I actually do in terms of riding but I kind of don't care! Any thoughts on the original F4 as a rider?
 

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I have the 1000. It took a while to get used to the power but she's excellent in town, smooth, easy to ride, buttery smoorh gear changes, lane splitting at lights etc. The 750 is really a gorgeous cafe racer at heart. Go for it.
 
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In town - no
Around town - yes
This is basically what I do with my motorcycles. Have a one hour ride and come home again. Nice thrill.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have the 1000. It took a while to get used to the power but she's excellent in town, smooth, easy to ride, buttery smoorh gear changes, lane splitting at lights etc. The 750 is really a gorgeous cafe racer at heart. Go for it.
Thanks! Yeah that's the great thing about these high revving 4s, they're super smooth and easy at low speeds, just no fun around town torque
 

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I personally do some occasional commuting on my F4 through the city of Atlanta. Is it the ideal bike for it? No. Although it does not get as hot as my 996 or 848, it does indeed not like to sit in traffic due to lack of airflow through the fairings but I do make it happen!
 

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I appreciate your love of the classic bikes.... old Brit bikes are kind of fun to fiddle with (and you do need to fiddle if you want to use it). I would like to get a late 60's Triumph myself (had a 500 T100C Tiger when they were still new).
I like the simplicity of older bikes and the fact that back when they were new the rider was expected to be able to work on it.
You might also consider a Brutale 750...much better around town bike. Basically a naked F4.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I appreciate your love of the classic bikes.... old Brit bikes are kind of fun to fiddle with (and you do need to fiddle if you want to use it). I would like to get a late 60's Triumph myself (had a 500 T100C Tiger when they were still new).
I like the simplicity of older bikes and the fact that back when they were new the rider was expected to be able to work on it.
You might also consider a Brutale 750...much better around town bike. Basically a naked F4.
Hey thanks for your response! Crazy, I've got a 1968 T100C. Here's a video of me starting mine:

That's interesting about the brutale 750, I didn't realize they made a brutale version of the 750. I'm not a HUGE fan of the brutales, I like some of their modern street bikes but for me the sleak styling of the f4 is more appealing. Although that 750 is pretty cool looking
 

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Nice... obviously in good state of tune. Sounds lovely.
You know you can get new gaiters for those forks !!!
 

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Gorgeous Triumph!

The F4 750 is actually not bad at all around town (new york city) - the factory suspension setup is quite soft and the clutch is light enough that stop and go is no big deal. Certainly far more comfortable than a 916; my left hand gives up very quickly when i get stuck in traffic on mine, just given the amount of force needed to feather the dry clutch.

Couple pointers though
Handle the cooling situation first, stock f4 750 will happily overheat in city riding in the summer. Combination of engine ice coolant and flashed eeprom from Merc07 that flips the fans on earlier were a big improvement, there's also an upgraded water pump to slosh more coolant around.
Stock suspension set up is pretty solid for city riding, so long you stick with 120/65 tire in the front. Going with the 1000 sized tires really messes with the geometry.
Back of the damper, otherwise slow speed steering maneuvering makes the bike roll.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Nice... obviously in good state of tune. Sounds lovely.
You know you can get new gaiters for those forks !!!
Gorgeous Triumph!

The F4 750 is actually not bad at all around town (new york city) - the factory suspension setup is quite soft and the clutch is light enough that stop and go is no big deal. Certainly far more comfortable than a 916; my left hand gives up very quickly when i get stuck in traffic on mine, just given the amount of force needed to feather the dry clutch.

Couple pointers though
Handle the cooling situation first, stock f4 750 will happily overheat in city riding in the summer. Combination of engine ice coolant and flashed eeprom from Merc07 that flips the fans on earlier were a big improvement, there's also an upgraded water pump to slosh more coolant around.
Stock suspension set up is pretty solid for city riding, so long you stick with 120/65 tire in the front. Going with the 1000 sized tires really messes with the geometry.
Back of the damper, otherwise slow speed steering maneuvering makes the bike roll.
That's so helpful thanks! I'll bookmark these points. I've gotta think it'll be less comfortable than my old Triumph in most ways, especially the ergonomics, but I'm also used to horrendous 50 year old suspension and the heaviest clutch of all time lol, so I'm sure it'll actually be better in some ways
 

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I did the Eprom and manual fan switch too. I'm in one of the colder capitals cities in Aus and its not cold enough to need anti ice if you don't leave your bike outside at night. I went back to Penrite race coolant inhibitor. Which is basically water mixed with corrosion inhibitor. I think it may even cool better than engine ice, but definitely not worse.
 

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I went back to Penrite race coolant inhibitor. Which is basically water mixed with corrosion inhibitor. I think it may even cool better than engine ice, but definitely not worse.
I talked to one of the technical folks (at Putoline I think it was, memory?) who told me water is more efficient, so almost pure water should be better than engine ice.
 

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Pure water is the best coolant - until it freezes.
There are other considerations like corrosion protection, lubrication, environmental effects, etc.
 
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