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Discussion Starter #1
Last week I experienced a rather fast deflection of the rear tyre whilst in the outside lane of a motorway. One second I was nipping along then the front seemed to go light which rapidly developed into rear fish tailing. Luckily I managed to keep the bike upright and gingerly got the bike to the hard shoulder as quickly as I could. On inspection the tyre was completely deflated and I could see a small rear in the middle section. With no repair kit on me I had to wait 1.5hrs before being recovered home. Whilst I've been riding 20+ years this my first puncture and it's made me consider how best to prepare for any future events. I've looked at a traditional repair kit and the tyre sealant which you inject directly into the tyre. Interested in any views on these options?
 

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The treated rope or rubber plug with a CO2 cartridge has worked well for everyone I know who has had the need.

I don't think I would use and injectable sealant unless there was no other way. My experiences with that on lawn equipment tires has been terrible.
 

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I've managed to avoid punctures on a bike (no doubt that will now be rectified on my next ride!!). I always try to carry a limited plug kit and a couple of 'air' cartridges to get sufficient volume into the tyre before getting properly inflated. I know the recommendation is mostly to replace the tyre and not run with a plug but I've known guys to do fast road riding on a plugged tyre with no issue, you just need to be sensible on where the puncture is, i.e. no plugging on or near the sidewalls (obviously)... I wouldn't use the tyre sealant 'spray', too bulky and used it on a car tyre a fews years back and when I took to my deal to get a 'proper' puncture repair they said that wasn't possible as the sealant in effect knackers the inside of the tyre for the purposes of a tyre patch. I though this was BS but have heard others told the same story by other tyre repair places. I assume the same deal for a bike tyre.

https://www.sportsbikeshop.co.uk/motorcycle_parts/content_prod/101778
 

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Who ever replaces your tire with the sealer goop in it will hate you !!!

The road side emergency plug kit (essentially automotive stuff with CO2 cartridges to inflate) work great to get you home....as long as it is just a small puncture. Cuts, large holes or damage in the sidewall are not repairable.

A "patch/plug" or "mushroom plug" installed from inside the tire will make a permanent repair that I would not hesitate to ride on until the tread is worn out. Most dealers won't do it because their lawyers tell them not to, but it can be easily done....once the tire is removed.
 
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As has been said, tyre fitters hate the sealant gloop and it goes everywhere.

That said, they are a simple and cost effective method of getting you to a garage / bar.

The roadside plugs (not the ones installed by tyre shops) are IMO fiddly and you need a few co2 cartridges to inflate a decent size rear tyre.
 

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Users of V, W, Y, Z rated tyres should avoid using any sealant

I used oko whilst a bike courier In the 80s and nevet suffered any punctures...
Their website says "Users of V, W, Y, Z rated tyres should avoid using any sealant." so I'm guessing that counts most MV users out? Shame seems great product.
 

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I have always carried a repair kit and a way to inflate the tire tire with me. Correction: I have always carried one, since the first time I needed it and didn't have one.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
So I've made a temp repair with the plug and glue method and got hold of a replacement Rosso II tyre. It was cheaper by £40 to ship from Italy than source locally in the UK! Been phoning around my local bike dealers this week to get the tyre changed over, but nobody can do it due to the size of the rear axle nut. Also scared myself silly reading the horror posts of seized nuts and 220 NM torque requirements :frown2:

Rather than chance a budget items on eBay I've ordered up a decent spec tool, but just found out the supplier is out of stock and have to wait a further 10 days. The joys of MV ownership :|
 

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Tyre plugger solution is perfect to repair on the go: it's a mushroom plug you insert from the outside of the tire (no sealant, just rubber); then you just have to inflate the tire. Works on cars, bikes and so on. Only case where it doesn't work is when the hole is too big, but in that case, there is simply no solution.
 

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I've gotten a few punctures because of how I ride. With heat the tire picks up nails and punctures itself. Never the front... always the rear.

Anyway, never repair the front in any way.

Mushroom plugs are robust but will throw off the wheel balance.

Dynaplugs are really good but usually takes more than one to repair.

Can carry CO2 canisters but it won't fill your tire up fully.

I carry dynaplugs and CO2... thats all that will even fit on a sport bike anyway usually.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
It took a few weeks for the rear wheel removal tool to turn up, but worth the wait as it's a quality bit of kit. The wheel came off without any drama and the local Ducati dealership replaced the tyre and balanced the wheel. Whilst other bike shops could replace the tyre non had a wheel adapter to perform the balancing.

With the wheel off I took the opportunity to fully clean and lubricate the chain, the rear links where quite dry so a good exercise. Held my breath as I torqued up the rear wheel nut 220nm, but everything was fine and after a few rides the 'new' rear tyre has been nicely scrubbed in.
 

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It took a few weeks for the rear wheel removal tool to turn up, but worth the wait as it's a quality bit of kit. The wheel came off without any drama and the local Ducati dealership replaced the tyre and balanced the wheel. Whilst other bike shops could replace the tyre non had a wheel adapter to perform the balancing.

With the wheel off I took the opportunity to fully clean and lubricate the chain, the rear links where quite dry so a good exercise. Held my breath as I torqued up the rear wheel nut 220nm, but everything was fine and after a few rides the 'new' rear tyre has been nicely scrubbed in.
I actually carry the dedicated nut with me when touring, since i nearly got stuck once when the only tyre shop in a 300km radius misplaced their 55mm big socket.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Yes, will be storing a repair kit and wheel removal tool under the seat, just in case!
 
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