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Discussion Starter #1
Just curious if anyone knows the anticipated productions numbers that Ducati is planning on for the the base 1098, S, tricolor.
What about the 2006 MV1000S and 2007 MV1000R numbers??

...I like that idea of investing in Ducati stock and buying an MV1000R!!! :highclap:

Indy
 

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I don't have it in front of me but seem to remember production capacity at 3000 combined; Brutale and F4? Maybe someone remembers exactly. The numbers are not commonly found - usually they are quoted as a whole which encompasses Cagiva, Husky and MV.

I'd hazard a guess that the numbers of F4s produced for worldwide consumption to be about the same as that of 1098 imported just into North America?
 

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Indy said:
...I like that idea of investing in Ducati stock and buying an MV1000R!!! :highclap:

Indy
Get both bikes MV-R in classic red/silver :stickpoke and 1098.
Screw the stocks Ducati stock gonna be like a black Jack if you like it that :)


Welcome to the club :nutkick:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Boring quarterly report LINK here

The last quarterly report from Ducati stated about 5,600 total units produced for ALL models. ~25,000 for the year.
If I read the 106 pages right, they doubled the shares outstanding this summer by taking an eight year bank loan of $80 million Euro to float the ship until the new management's 2006-08 'restructure' plan is complete.

The Ducati Group reported a significant loss in 2005.
Following developments of the market and the unsatisfactory results, the Board of Directors of the
parent company approved a recovery plan for the period 2006-2008 on 13 April 2006 whose primary
objective is the improvement of margins and cash flow as opposed to an aggressive push for higher
revenues, thereby re-positioning the company's focus on models of the higher range which have higher
margins and, at the same time, reducing the company's structural costs. Management believes that the
Group has the ability to compete successfully at the top end of the market, although changed
competitive conditions require plans for a reduced presence at lower levels.
The corporate recovery plan for the three-year period 2006-2008 - approved on 13 April 2006 by the
Board of Directors of the parent company - forecasts a consolidated net negative result of circa 3% of
revenues for 2006, the attainment of a break-even in 2007 and a return to profitability in 2008.
The 2006-2008 recover play assumed a condition for its implementation (which has in any case already
occurred on the date of drafting of this report): the implementation of a share capital increase of € 80.0
million on the part of the Company in order to detain the financial resources required by the plan and to
be able to finance the introduction of the new models for the top end of the market. The plan forecasts
the attainment of its objectives by focalizing the offer on motorcycle models that belong to the top end
of the market and by reducing the structural costs of the Group. In particular, the Group plans on
renewing its range of motorcycles during the three-year period of the plan by:
(i) the launch of five new models;
(ii) continuous renewal of the range of existing models; and
(iii) the halt in production of motorcycles belonging to product families which have reached the
end of their life cycle.
The Group intends to attract new clients by using the Monster 695 model as the primary "entrance
gate" to the range of Ducati motorcycles.
Also of interest is a lawsuit settlement to Hailwood:

(€ 26 thousand as of 31 December 2005) for the residual fund linked to the M.
Hailwood agreement. Ducati Motor Holding S.p.A. and its subsidiary Ducati North America Inc.
were called before the New Jersey District Court by the widow of the champion motorcyclist Mike
Hailwood, acting as the alleged trustee of his estate. Mrs Hailwood maintained that by marketing
and selling a model called the "MH900e", using Mike Hailwood's initials as a tribute to his
memory and his career, the Company has violated the brand license that protected his name and
initials, and the related promotion rights, both of which belong to Mr Hailwood's estate. Mrs
Hailwood asked for compensation for the damages resulting from this alleged violation, together
with an injunction to prevent the Company from using Mike Hailwood's name and initials any
more. In order to settle the dispute, an agreement was reached between the Company and the
counterparty.
This agreement envisages paying € 375 thousand to the counterparty for the definitive closure of
the dispute, in addition to other agreements for future collaboration with the heir D. Hailwood. €
349 thousand has already been paid to the counterparty, while the remaining € 26 thousand is
awaiting payment.
 

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JamesC said:
I don't have it in front of me but seem to remember production capacity at 3000 combined; Brutale and F4? Maybe someone remembers exactly. The numbers are not commonly found - usually they are quoted as a whole which encompasses Cagiva, Husky and MV.

I'd hazard a guess that the numbers of F4s produced for worldwide consumption to be about the same as that of 1098 imported just into North America?
Evening everyone,

Hey James, I'm under the impression the total yearly build is 8,000 or maybe a couple hundred over that. Still most MV's stay in Europe, I think European sales were in the 5,300 neighborhood last year. As I've mentioned in a previous post, the building in Varase where the engines {MV only}are assembled is maxxed out with three 8 hour shifts. Evidently, they are putting together powerplants 24 hours a day and they have been for quite some time. I always thought this was a fairly good indication of where the company stands and where it IS and IS NOT going. Castiglioni considers MV at the absolute ceiling and wants to keep it that way, he likens it to Ferrari and he uses the prancing horse as a bussiness model or an example of perfection. He sees Ferrari clients putting deposits on cars 2 or 3 years in advance and he sees this as a goal for MV. He never wants to increase production! Regarding how many of each model, I think its a fair bit more Brutales at this point, maybe 2/3rds give or take. {2/3rds is even a little low, Brutales are starting to steal the F4's thunder}

As for the 1098 I dont know.. I DO know that on a good year Ducati can go up to 40,000 to 45,000 total units produced, maybe even kiss 50,000. Although I dont think they reach these numbers every year, I think success with the 1098 is a sure thing and it wouldnt surprise me if they surpass the upper end of these numbers. I dont know how it whacks up per country or by model. I think its safe to assume they will make a lot of 1098's, twice as many as MV's total output maybe? Maybe even more, who knows. The monster's are selling well and the retro's are doing well also so Ducati is doing great. They seem to be making no secret of their desire to expand in scope, I dont think there is a bad side to this, they are poised for continiued greatness.

Just to put these #'s in perspective, Honda and the others build a huge amout of bikes. I think each company is in the 1 million bikes built per year neighborhood. Some over, some just under. All bikes under the Cagiva umbrella {MV, Husqvarna, Cagiva} total yearly build is 24,000 give or take.





Hedges,

FBD

P.S. If anyone knows otherwise please set me straight, I am wrong about most things, most often.
 
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