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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Apologies if this has been answered before, I know there are a lot of clutch slave/pushrod threads on the forums, but I couldn't find anything that addressed my specific issue.

So I've removed the clutch slave and/or sprocket cover a few times, and every time I did the pushrod was stuck in the clutch slave piston and would come out a bit, maybe an inch or two, before I could get enough clearance to hold it down while I removed the slave and/or sprocket cover. Then, every time I went to re-install, I couldn't push the rod all the way back in by hand (or at least that's what it felt like - it'd get to a hard stop in the pressure plate cap and just stop). My process has been to install the sprocket cover, then seat the slave as far as I can by hand, then thread the bolts in by hand until they contact the body of the slave, then basically work the slave into the rod by incrementally tightening the three slave bolts in a circle-pattern a bit at a time (or maybe work the rod into the slave, if what I'm doing is actually pushing the clutch piston in instead of seating the rod in the pressure plate cap?).

Anyway, now I have an oil leak that may be coming from the clutch slave area, and I'm wondering if there was a better way to do this this whole time. I'm replacing the slave cylinder with an Oberon that I have on-order, but if my method of re-seating the pushrod is what possibly damaged the OE seal I definitely don't want to do it to the new slave when it comes in. Any tips? Thanks guys!
 

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Old Wing Nut
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The clutch push rod has spiral oil grooves in the end that pushes against the pressure plate. You always want to remove and install the rod from the right side of the engine as the grooves can damage the oil seal the push rod runs through. Never pull the rod all the way out when you remove the slave cylinder.
What you are doing is just fine. You want to prevent the rod from coming all the way out through the seal and damaging it.
The reason you have to force the slave cylinder on during installation is because the piston naturally migrates outward as it sits hanging loose. You can't easily push the slave piston in to to the cylinder by hand. Your method of starting the mounting screws and progressively tightening them is a normal process.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So when it says "right side" it means the slave cylinder side, right, that's the "clutch control cylinder"? I always think of directionals from the riders perspective so it seems backwards to me.

Where is the oil seal it references that could be damaged? The manual says "1, see diagram on page 58" but page 58 in the manual that I have is just a diagram of the engine cylinder head, has nothing to do with the clutch at all. The only seals I see in any of the clutch assy diagrams are the two seals in the clutch slave itself? :(
 

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Old Wing Nut
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Right side is the rider's right.....the seal is on the left side of the transmission shaft/engine...slave cylinder is on the left. Push rod must come out the right side to prevent seal damage.
 
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Those images are from the Engine Manual.
Directions are always from "As Seated" on the bike.
Therefore, you would have to remove the clutch cover and the clutch pressure plate in order to properly remove the pushrod.

Font Line Auto part Drawing Diagram
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for that. Is that seal visible at all? I thought that part in the diagram was part of the slave cylinder based on how the parts are aligned in it. I can't wrap my head around where it's located. Is that seal the little metal collar between the countershaft sprocket cover and the transmission cover that the pushrod runs through? Or is it behind the transmission cover somewhere?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I think this is where my confusion comes in here...the parts fiche lists that seal as part of the slave cylinder. So then if the slave cylinder has to be removed first to get the pushrod out that side anyway, how could removing the pushrod damage the seal, unless it wasn't actually part of the slave cylinder. Ugh.

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Here it is on a Ducati S4Rs Monster I was restoring....this was the AS FOUND condition:

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It's really just a durable O-ring. I'd try a local hardware or a place like McMaster-Carr.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Oh shit...seriously? Like it's just a tight fit between the shaft and the hole/socket in this picture?

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I have a whole assortment of buna-n O-rings that I picked up a while back, I'll have to see if one fits.
 

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Those images are from the Engine Manual.
Directions are always from "As Seated" on the bike.
Therefore, you would have to remove the clutch cover and the clutch pressure plate in order to properly remove the pushrod.

View attachment 498388
I don't know about a seal on the left side of the engine where the clutch rod is (I don't remember ever seeing one), but the part you have circled in the image I believe is a seal that is embedded in the slave cylinder. I went out and took mine off just to be sure:
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I think this is the seal being discussed #9 in this picture:


Rectangle Font Parallel Diagram Auto part





and the marked item in this extract from a workshop manual:

Font Engineering Auto part Machine Titanium


The seal is fitted from the inside of the gearbox side panel so to change it the gearbox needs to be dismantled. Heed the warning!

It is part number 800064296 oil seal 8-16-5.

#1 circled in one of the above posts is the oil seal in the clutch slave piston.
 

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There is a lot of wrong information here.

There is NO sealing in this place (red circle).
The "gap" between push-rod and housing is for one of the 2 sockets, which intend the sprocket cover to be in the correct position.
 

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The "gap" between push-rod and housing is for one of the 2 sockets, which intend the sprocket cover to be in the correct position.
Apparently we are both wrong, @Manfred !!
AS @Tony F has, I believe, correctly identified, the seal is internal.
The locating pins for the cover do not reside inside the clutch slave, but a rubber seal does and I'm pretty sure that is what the space is intended to accommodate.
Even on my S4Rs there is space for the slave cylinder rubber seal as I see it.
 

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Old Wing Nut
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Yep.... seal is inside. Hence the warning about withdrawing the push rod from the left side, dragging the spiral grooves past the seal and possibly damaging it.
Good news is that removing the transmission is not that difficult.....IF you know how to work on stuff and have tools.
Font Auto part Parallel Elbow Machine
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Yep.... seal is inside. Hence the warning about withdrawing the push rod from the left side, dragging the spiral grooves past the seal and possibly damaging it.
Good news is that removing the transmission is not that difficult.....IF you know how to work on stuff and have tools.
View attachment 498419
Thanks for all the help guys. This makes sense. As for if I know how to work on stuff...I'm somewhere in the middle. I'm an engineer, so I can generally understand how mechanical things work if I study them. I have just about all of the "normal" tools a mechanic would need, and generally do everything on my own vehicles other than things that require specialty tools, lifts, engine stands, etc. I've replaced the starter, sprag and freewheel in my 916, and have replaced the gear selector sprocket and pawls on the F4, as well as maintenance stuff and some other odds and ends, but I've never had a reason to remove a cassette transmission, or dismantle a gearset. It makes me nervous. lol

If I slid an O-ring to seal between the pushrod and the pushrod shaft in the transmission cover, and let it sit between the possibly damaged OE seal and the locating collar that sits between the trans cover and sprocket cover, kind of like what silentservice is suggesting, you guys thing that would be a safe/functional stopgap until I can figure out a plan of action on pulling the transmission and source the parts and all that? I can't imagine the clearance is so tight in there that an O-ring wouldn't even fit...
 

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Apparently we are both wrong, @Manfred !!
AS @Tony F has, I believe, correctly identified, the seal is internal.
The locating pins for the cover do not reside inside the clutch slave, but a rubber seal does and I'm pretty sure that is what the space is intended to accommodate.
Even on my S4Rs there is space for the slave cylinder rubber seal as I see it.
No,
don't make a mistake,
please see the backside of the sprocket cover.
There must be a socket, not a seal,
in the market area.
The push rod is lead through one of these 2 sockets
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Font Elbow Parallel Auto part Drawing

It is number 47, onl shown once in this picture,
but listed 2 times in this assy
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
No,
don't make a mistake,
please see the backside of the sprocket cover.
There must be a socket, not a seal,
in the market area.
The push rod is lead through one of these 2 sockets View attachment 498420 View attachment 498421
It is number 47, onl shown once in this picture,
but listed 2 times in this assy
Manfred - thanks! I'm reading through the engine manual, and it looks like the primary shaft bearing (4 in the diagram you attached) and the oil seal (9) would be pressed into the transmission case cover on the inside of the hole for the clutch pushrod, does that mean I'll need to remove both of the assembled transmission shafts from the bearings in the trans case cover, pull the primary shaft bearing (4) from the case cover, replace the oil seal (9) behind it, then press the bearing back in with a press, then re-seat the transmission shafts into the bearings?

If that's the case, I wish they would have made that warning about the pushrod clearer, larger, and maybe in red. :ROFLMAO::oops:
 
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