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Discussion Starter #1
Yesterday, I picked up my new 2006 F4 blue/silver from Fast by Ferracci after getting the wheels painted like SP01 kit. Drove it for 40 miles coming home from the dealer. The bike sounds and rides great. so far, the only issue is the rear brake. it seems like the rear brakes are not working or not grabbing much like the front. Will this get better as the pads gets old?

My neck, elbow, and right hand wrist was hurting after the ride. The neck was hurting because I had to lift the head high to see the road. It maybe becasue I have a AGV ti-tech helment (which is a rece helmet). Elbow was hurting because of the aggressive lean. Anyway seeing it parked takes care of all compliants.

Any thoughts or comments on my first impression will be appreciated.

Sajan
 

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The F4 has a quite sporty riding position.

A different helmet may or may not help, but I think you might also want to look into bar risers if this bothers you.
 

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take your time and enjoy the ride. after a little while you may get used to some of the things that ache you. if not, you can make adjustments then.

and welcome/congrats. :toothless
 

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The rear brake has been an ongoing issue and concern! Has anyone tried an alternative other than "not using it". I told the dealer about that... he said "you dont use your rear brake anyway", what an idiot!

I wonder if a different rotor and brake pads would fix it!
 

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Bar risers would help, for sure, but the best solution is to condition the muscle for riding IMO.

Don't get me wrong! I am not saying that you are out of shape, because I don't know if you are or not; the fact is that even if you are a pro bodybuilder, not used to doing things with your body a certain way may just be a bit too much at first.. so this is just a friendly suggestion

IMO, cycling would be a great exercise to suppliment motorcycle riding (I am sure luvtolean would agree with this too)since it will help strengthen and condition your core and leg muscles. just like in cycling, I believe that when riding a high performance motorcycle it is important to use your lower back, abs and legs to do most of the work for maintaining your riding position.

The common knowledge in road cycling is that you shouldn't put more than 20-30% of your body weight on the hands/bar, because when the hands are light and elbows are bent, you will have better steering input and feed back(like a set of shocks), it also will reduce/prevent numb hands and jerky ride when spinning(pedaling) fast, and the list of benefit goes on... so in cycling, a strong and conditioned core is a must on a long ride, especially because of the aggressive flat-back position.

When riding a high performance sports bike, it is even more important to have a strong core and leg muscle(as well as other parts of the body) since the g force is much greater then in cycling, during hard braking or hard cornering(espcially when hanging off) it's crucial that the core and legs do most of the work(rigid core and legs squeezing the tank) to maintain riding position against the intense G-force so the hands/arms can have the dexterity to feel and perform the delicate task of steering and modulating the levers... FYI, when the "hanging off" position/technique was taught at the California Superbike School, Keith Code had us do quick side to side hang off positions on a stationary bike with the our arms behind our backs.

I believe you will see major improvement in riding comfort if you incoporate cycling and core strengthing exercises into your workouts, like the ones on those large excercise balls. just my $.02. :guitarist
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Odonata. I do workout everyday and pretty much in shape. However, I don't do any core exercises. Maybe that will make some changes. Secondly, I probably have to get used to the riding position. Like you stated, I have to learn to only put 20-30% of the weight on my arms.

Anything on the rear brakes. Should I upgrade it or just use the front brakes.

Sajan
 

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I never use the back brake Sajan. :)
 

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svagusta said:
Anything on the rear brakes. Should I upgrade it or just use the front brakes.
IMHO give the back brakes a chance. If they aren't better after 150 or 200 miles then they should be bled.
 

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and bled, and bled with high temp race fluid, and bled again, then you may get tired and relocate the rear reservoir (see mvfaq blog), and THEN if you aren't satisfied you'll be another person saying you don't use the rear brake! :blah:
 

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MV Cellist
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I think I heard some pro racer say that his rear brake is the anti wheelie/spin device. I know he is talking specifically about track/racing, but the rear brake is not very useful on the pavement like the front.

While I do recognize that in maximum braking drills, with a lot of practice 2 brakes are better than one, but the rear brake is only effective the 1st split-second before most of the weight transfer to the front and that the rear tire is barely in contact with the ground, and even when using it, I certainly don't want the rear brake system to be so powerful that locks the rear up easily... IMHO.

Thanks Odonata. I do workout everyday and pretty much in shape. However, I don't do any core exercises. Maybe that will make some changes. Secondly, I probably have to get used to the riding position. Like you stated, I have to learn to only put 20-30% of the weight on my arms.
N/P! even if cycling is not practical for your schedule/life, the exercise ball is easy to deal with, just try sitting on one while you watch TV/computer for an hour or two and lifting legs off the ground(march, or lifting one or 2 legs for core balance) from time to time, I bet you will feel it the next day... make sure you inflate them properly.

I have done a lot of those balance & strength workouts if you need ideas just let me know.
 

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congrats on ur MV...i just picked mine up last week....i have the same complaint with the rear brake....kind of stopped using it already....
 

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Congrats on the new bike!

I agree that cycling is a great cross-trainer; But for myself I have a back injury and therefore bought the Brutale which is much friendlier to your body (under 100mph anyway :naughty: ).
About the rear brake, like stated the mv faq has tips to resolve it, but oddly enough mine has had zero issues, despite the resevoir being right next to the exhuast :rolleyes:
But like you said, any minor annoyance is worth it just to look at these machines :)
 
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