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Seriously, MV should be slapped for how torqued some of these bolts are.


I'm in the process of pulling the rearsets and the exhaust heat shield to paint. One bolt refuses to budge. It is starting to strip the inside of the bolt head. Before I completely bugger it, what can I do to get this damn thing unstuck?:frown2:
 

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Which allen tool exactly are you using to get it off?
 

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And before you answer, the rearset bolts have a more permanent loctite from the factory. You need about a minute of direct heat gun on the bolt/frame plate before attempting.
 

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?

I've never seen LocTite on foot peg mounts.......
The release temperature of LocTite is 500°F......good luck with a heat gun:wink2:
Try some Kroil or a 50/50 mixture of ATF and acetone

Yes, I've had stuck ones......I just drill them>:)
 

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I use a propane torch to heat up the metal surrounding the bolt...and then judicious application of impact (impact driver and 16 oz hammer). When all that fails the drill comes out.
 

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I never saw rearsets that look like footpegs. This pic is from an F4, not an F3 but it's a different loctite used on both, compared to alkost all the other bolts. Need to heat it up. I stripped two. Kroil that creaps (sic) was not my friend. A 12" or longer ratchet gives you the leverage you need. The factory supplied allen keys are terrible for this job.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The left side ones were tight, but doable in about 30 seconds. Right side, top one was a beastie and bottom one won't budge. Zero loctite. They are just torqued to fuckall. I'm beginning to see the torque paint pen color in my thoughts. :crazyeyes

Just using a L shaped allen wrench. Going over to a buddies tomorrow or Tues he's got a torch and the allen bits so hopefully we can work some magic.

I know I said rearsets but meant the stock pegs haha.

So how do you drill it out of this fails? gah.
 

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This is what Ed was referring to.....an impact screwdriver
Every motorcycle owner should have one.....bought mine in '75 it was cheaper than a Craftsman one :grin2:
 

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Might I suggest you'd be better using a long bar with a hex socket. The leverage should crack it off without too much effort.

I like impact guns, generally they're great, but after stripping the pins off a locking wheel nut key with a waaay overtorqued lug nut courtesy of the tyre shop retards (about 30 seconds of impact action on a HD Milwaukee tool with nothing but dust coming off the nut), the impact action contributed to damage in a scenario where a long bar probably would have cracked it off with a lot less carnage and damage.

I wouldn't use an impact screwdriver with all that aluminium about. It's unnecessary and could cause collateral damage, not least cracks to the ally.

Cheers
Nito
 

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So how do you drill it out of this fails? gah.
It's the steel to aluminum interface, not necessarily excessive tightening torque...bolt corrodes in place.

Drilling is easy, the internal hex is the guide for your drill bit. Select a bit that is the same size as the threaded shaft of the bolt, drill until the head falls off. Now you have an unloaded, unshielded bolt shaft sticking out. Usually the threaded shaft can then be easily removed.

If still stuck apply penetrating oil, apply heat and unscrew with your vice grips.

But if you were trying to undo this one with the hex key from the tool kit I will wager using a proper tool will make short work of it. Proper hex socket and breaker bar.
 

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Another alternative if the hex fails, prior to drilling is using a slightly oversized Torx bit. Knock it in and these usually give a fantastic purchase.
 

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I guarantee you that the oem hex key is not the best tool to use here. I'm an expert at this. I was halfway to adding the third stripped bolt to my resume when a friend came by with a long ratchet and a hex socket. Came right off. I felt so stupid doing it this way all these years.
 

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It's the steel to aluminum interface, not necessarily excessive tightening torque...bolt corrodes in place.
Dis-similar metals, a very light smear of grease on the bolt head and treads upon reassembly would be a good idea. NOT anti-seize.

I had to drill the head exactly as stated after stripping the head, even with a good socket and ratchet. A t-handle socket wrench would be best.
 

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From what I understand the extra lubrication of anti seize can cause a specific tightening torque to be higher/tighter in reality than otherwise?!

Aside from that, copper slip anti seize being conductive?

Edit; after a quick google... I should add below relates to brakes...

There is a problem however, aluminium is very susceptible to an electrochemical reaction known as a galvanic corrosion when it comes into contact with copper in the presence of an electrolyte, even salty water will do!
 

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From what I understand the extra lubrication of anti seize can cause a specific tightening torque to be higher/tighter in reality than otherwise?!

Aside from that, copper slip anti seize being conductive?
Any grease changes the tightening torque of a bolt not specified to be lubricated.

Your reasoning is unsound. Why would conductivity be an issue on a metal to metal joint?

If you are lubricating a bolt not specified for lubrication and then torquing said bolt, you will have to reduce the force by 20-30% of specification.

Coppa-slip and Never-seez are designed for joints of dissimilar metals and are specified for this purpose.

Personally, I use Nuclear Grade Pure Nickle Never-Seez for these types of things.

Nuclear Never Seize.jpg
 

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When I buy Titanium/Aluminium bolts from Pro Bolt they always supply a small sachet of Anti-sieze and recommend using it to stop galling of dissimilar metals.
So I will continue to use it.:smile2:
 
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