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Discussion Starter #1
I plenty of threads on "types of" and "how to install" traction control systems, but have not seen any responses in regards to how it may improved, or not, their riding skills on the track. Any improvement in lap time as compared to before the installation? Less crashes or less near crashes? Reduced spinning or rear wheel steering as a result, and did you have to change your riding style? Would probably like to hear from Donsy as you've raced before and after installing T/C. Hopefully without many other modifications from baseline before testing.

Has anyone tried any other bikes/systems, such as the Aprilia RSV4 with APRC? Is it like the commercial says "inspires confidence"?
 

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No traction control on my bikes mate, I keep wishing though !
I've ridden a well set-up ZX10 with traction control on and off, and it makes a massive difference on the track, I wouldn't bother with it for the road, best to improve riding skill's instead.
 

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ok, for the road ,here is an example ,Tuono v4 with traction control comes out of a 90 degree corner at pace with traction control on, I am right up his backside he looses it ,now did the traction control save his arse, nooooo. Donsy is correct learn to ride your bike without aids, Saved me backside the other day.
Track is a whole different kettle of fish.
plus my mates 1090 rr has traction control but it just does not work at all .Invest in a steering dampener and have it fully set on hard, just might save your life.

cheers eddy
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yeah, opinions on track is preferred. Using/activating on the street has to many variables to consider. At the track you can see which corner it is being used the most. On my last track day I was watching videos of riders after they came in from their session and noticed that their traction control (dashboard camera) was being activated quite often. Didn't ask what setting they had it at though, but they were in the A group. If you ever get T/C Donsy, would really like your view how it worked for you at the track.
 

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I'm even thinking about disabling TC all together on my B3. It gives me far more freights than a bit of rear wheel spin. Cutting power mid corner is scary and caused me to run "wide" more than once. :jsm:

No track day on the B3 yet.
 

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I don't have much experience with it on a bike but in a car all it did was slow my exit speeds on the corners so I turned it off....
 

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Hi, on my F3 and TC set to 3 , on my track roads that I practice every days, if your spinning increase slowly , the TC doesn't understands that the tire spins and therefore didn't cut the power. I tested yesterday a new supersport tire .
The TC is based on crank acceleration rev maps with different slopes, from smoother to sharper curves.(allowing 1 to 18% sharp increase before to act=BAZZAZ principle). It's different than those based on differential spinning wheels (sensors on wheel rotors like ABS)
The values of engine revs are far more precise than those from wheels.
Another example : if there is a bump on the corner exit, the TC helps the entire bike to perfom a smooth jump without a free spinning flying rear wheel, but the time of shutting power can be reduced to almost 0 if the TC is set to level 1; then your tire don't overheat or wear, you have to adjust this while tracking (this option is possible when the laptimer is activated for those tracking):yo:

The tire grip level plays a role too. A new tire sticks better , I made the comparison between a old POWER3 and the supersport from Michelin:smoking:
 

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In a track environment, TC should only become an asset on these bikes for unrefined throttle twisting. Smooth roll on and power delivery shouldn't trigger the TC even at high settings. If your rear tire hits a slick patch while throttling on it may help or if your track is bumpy or rough it could help keep the rear in check as mentioned above, but otherwise you should be able to get the rear tire drifting with the TC engaged and it won't activate. "Track" riding isn't necessarily different from "real world" riding if the roads are clean and smooth.

I believe the APRC and S1000RR systems monitor the front and rear tires for wheelie control and TC, so their "confidence" comes from being able to ham-fist throttle and not have any worries of picking the front up or drifting the back which keeps you stable on your line and delivers "refined" power, though probably less than the bike could put down. Boring...
 

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TBH I'm not sure how much the traction control works. I did a little burn out for some mates I used to work with, after I rode off I noticed the traction control was set to 4 and not off so in theory it should have stopped the wheel spinning but it didn't, I didn't even notice it trying to cut in. I ride pretty hard and have never noticed it working, I just thought it was working but it was just very subtle, now I'm not sure if it does anything at all.
 

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A burn out is not what TC is about on the MV, the TC senses increases in rpmover and above what the engine can normaly deliver, it works by an algorithm of spikes in rpm increase, not by wheels sensor speed. It detects sharp rpm increases under real road or track conditions. So yes you can show off with a burnout at the pub, how good in real life out on the road or track it really is is possibly beyond most folks skill set.

jimboF4
 

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In a track environment, TC should only become an asset on these bikes for unrefined throttle twisting. Smooth roll on and power delivery shouldn't trigger the TC even at high settings. If your rear tire hits a slick patch while throttling on it may help or if your track is bumpy or rough it could help keep the rear in check as mentioned above, but otherwise you should be able to get the rear tire drifting with the TC engaged and it won't activate. "Track" riding isn't necessarily different from "real world" riding if the roads are clean and smooth.

I believe the APRC and S1000RR systems monitor the front and rear tires for wheelie control and TC, so their "confidence" comes from being able to ham-fist throttle and not have any worries of picking the front up or drifting the back which keeps you stable on your line and delivers "refined" power, though probably less than the bike could put down. Boring...

I could not disagree with you any more than I do right now, if you where talking 1090 only, I might agree, but when you mention Superbikes and racetracks, race tyres and no traction control, calling A or even B Grade riders ham fisted is way far from the truth.
 

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Fair enough Donsy. I kind of thought ham fisted was a bit much when I wrote it. Just exaggerating a bit :)
 

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Fair enough Donsy. I kind of thought ham fisted was a bit much when I wrote it. Just exaggerating a bit :)
Hahaha, no worries.
Look, I see it this way, and this discussion could carry on for years and come's around every so often, and I probably look at this from an reasonable experienced riders point of few.

With the amount of power some bikes produce these days traction control is essential in getting that power to the ground in a useful manner if you're trying to go as fast as possible on a track, there's just no way a guy on say a new ZX10 (no TC) will keep up on the track with a guy on similar bike (TC on) if both riders had the same skill level, this is a fact.

On the road I don't see TC being that useful unless you're riding as if you're on the track.
Most guys buying bikes "because" it has TC or ABS, do so because of a lower skill level, and most are prepared to admit to that, which is perfectly fine.
It's the guys who buy bikes with all this fruit, because they think it will help them go faster or keep them safe, who's in for a nasty surprise.

I still think going for a couple of track days and learning/improving skills will be more beneficial.
 

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I still think going for a couple of track days and learning/improving skills will be more beneficial.

I have friends I ride with who are always babbling on with "the TC saved me on this corner or the abs saved me on that one" and I just let them get on with it but I know it's BS because they're just not fast enough to get anywhere near to the limits of the bike or the tyres, and when comparing bikes if they're that good then I really shouldn't be quicker than them on my Brutale when they're on Ducati's latest sports bike offerings! haha

I think the only times I've knowingly got the TC working on mine is when the rear tyre goes airborne over a cats eye or similar, I know this because the cut off is so abrupt I hit my nuts in to the tank :laughing:
If I ever found myself regularly getting the TC working out of bends etc then I know I shouldn't be on the road that's for sure.

I've never bought a bike because it has electronic toys on it and wouldn't pay a premium to get them either, having said that I guess it does make resale more attractive (who looking for a used RSVR would choose a none APRC model, even if their not quick enough to activate it?)

Take the Brutale 800 RR and its clutch less down shifting as an example, I rode it yesterday and really don't know what all the fuss is about? Having said that the rest of the other upgrades make it worth the extra over the standard model.
 
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