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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings folks!

I took delivery of my Lusso about 300 miles ago, so I'm still in the process of running in. However now that I can use 9000 revs I've got some good feedback about the bike.
I reluctantly traded in my 2001 F4 Strada on it because frankly at 69 years old I wasn't very comfortable on it anymore. But it found a good home and the new owner will care for it.
I own a 2000 M900I Monster and a 2004 Triumph Sprint ST. I've also spent a week touring Italy on a 1200 Multistrada GT, so I have some good points of reference.
On paper the MV seemed like the perfect bike. I love the 955 triple in my Triumph, so the 800 triple in a lighter bike with a more natural riding position seems ideal. The artistry and history of MV motorcycles is seductive. So does the bike live up to the promise?
IMHO the answer is yes, mostly it does, The bike is stunning to look at and the attention to detail, fit and finish is as good as it gets. So here are my impressions:

Engine - Very racy but a little gruff at the lower end of the rev range. Hardly any flywheel effect which challenges smooth shifting. Not as sweet and mellow as the Triumph, but more eager with a harder edge. More than enough power from 800cc. However the fly-by-wire throttle is challenging. Even in the Rain Mode it is overly sensitive with too little resistance. It is nearly impossible to reach the cruise control button without tweaking the throttle and jerking the bike. I find myself having to reach over with my left hand to press the button so I can hold the throttle steady. Not good.
There is no friction in the throttle, so it has a very unnatural feel. I'll probably get used to it, but I've been riding motorcycles for over 50 years and this just doesn't feel right. Perhaps a stronger return spring is all it needs.

Gearbox - Darn near perfect. The power shift works flawlessly up or down and gives much smoother acceleration. A minor drawback to the power shift is a slight hitch from the clutch lever when shifting normally.

Suspension - I haven't really played with the different settings other than to put it in the softest one for our less than perfect Pennsylvania roads. It rides well, no complaints here. No doubt I will be able to really dial it it when I know it better.

Handling - Wow, this thing flicks about like a 250! Extraordinary nimbleness without being the least bit nervous at any speed. No steering damper is provided or needed. This is the bike's most endearing quality. It is feather light to the touch, yet solidly in the groove. How did they do that? To me it makes a Multistrada almost feel sluggish (which they are surely not).
You can change lines easily while healed over with complete confidence.

Brakes - Powerful and smooth. This is my first ABS bike so I'm still learning how to most effectively use the brakes. The rear ABS is impressive in it's function, but I've not tried the front yet. I hated the front brakes on the Multistrada because they were way too grabby. The initial bite was just too much, probably caused by Ducati's pad selection. The Lusso does not have this problem and the brakes are very powerful, yet easy to modulate - great for trail braking into a corner. The rear brake feels a bit spongy which is a little strange. I'll try bleeding it.

Comfort and Ergos - I'm 6 feet tall so I can just barely plant both boots flat on the ground. The bike feels nowhere near as top heavy as a Multistrada. The bars feel a tad bit close, but I'm pretty sure I can roll them back for a perfect fit. My biggest gripe with the bike is the seat which ramps down at the front shoving you against the tank. WTF? I am constantly sliding myself back (and thus up) in order to be comfortable. It's as if the seat was designed for a sport bike with low and forward bars. I spoke with the folks at Sargent about modifying the seat to a more level configuration. They reckon they can accomplish this, so I am going to send the seat off to them over the Winter. The windscreen gives reasonable protection with very little buffet, although not quite as good as a Multistrada, nor as relaxed at very high speed as my Sprint. Although it is adjustable it is actually less comfortable in the raised position, so I don't bother with that. Pedal position is good and the heated grips are very nice in at the lowest setting.

Fit and finish - Flawless paint and great attention to detail. Non better.

Features - The instrument cluster is attractive in color, but it is hard to find the information you need when barreling down the read. I don't like having to look down for too long when a slight glance would be much safer. It is nice to have two 12v accessory sockets, the USB outlets are nice. I put the Garmin North America app on my iPhone. No need for a Zumo now and I can keep it plugged in to the USB. My bike came with a battery maintainer, but no plugs or adaptors other than alligator clips. It is not one I am familiar with so I hard wired a plug for a Ctek maintainer as I have never fried a battery with one of those over the long winter storage. The built in Bluetooth is really nice and the data logger is a bonus.
The detachable panniers are really cool looking and very roomy, yet don't make the bike overly wide. Much better made than the ones on my Triumph too. I can't comment about water resistance yet as I have avoided riding in the rain - so far.

So, all in all a great bike. Other than the annoying seat and an overly sensitive throttle the bike is a revelation and I can't wait for the Spring to come so I can start to put many, many miles on it.

Things I would fix:
The seat.
The throttle resistance.
Make the rear mudguard continuous instead of two spaced apart pieces.
Offer a top box option.
Provide a simplified alternative instrument mode with less information but easier to see. Speed, Gear and RPM would be enough. This could be selectable with the mode switch.

Otherwise, The Perfect Motorcycle. Mille Grazie MV!
 

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Nice write up TedW, under the rear seat are 2 wires with rubber covers on them the supplied charger plugs into one of those and the other is for diagnostics, I emailed MV a couple of weeks ago and there is apparently a top box being developed for it as we speak, some people have made a custom map with the throttle sensitivity set to low and that seems to work for them, they are also working on a fix for the headlights, to keep both main and full beam on at the same time rather than "either, or" as it is just now, they are also working on a fix to change the dash from day mode to night mode automatically (as it states in the manual) when you have the auto light function on.
The two 12v outlets are both 2amp and the usb both 1amp.
Panniers are water resistant not water proof, saying that it has to be quite torrential or prolonged rain to get in.
And we'll done with the decision to send the seat to Sargent be interesting to see what they come up with.
Lastly Welcome to the forum you won't be disappointed with the people or knowledge the collective have.
Oh and I don't have any fancy pants electronic suspension or data logger so can't comment on them, have fun.
 

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Welcome to the forum mate. Nice write up, give the dash time, you've only done a days riding really and will get used to it still, same with the throttle.

FWIW, the quickshifter usually works a bit smoother at higher revs, a Powershifter is an altogether different thing.
 

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... My bike came with a battery maintainer, but no plugs or adaptors other than alligator clips...
Under your passenger seat, there's a plug that attaches directly to the battery tender that was supplied with the bike. MV recommends that you use their supplied tender.

Congratulations on your new bike (I've owned both a Sprint ST and a 1200 MTS - '12 and '15 btw), I'm loving mine, as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the pic EvilSteve. I guess someone forgot to put the plug that goes from the charger to the bike in the box.
 

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The plug in the bike connects directly to the charger, the was no extra connector required. The alligator clip connector that comes with the charger is still sitting in a box somewhere. Literally: wall -> charger -> bike. That's it.
 

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I'm not sure if the manual is right about the 2A max draw. I rode on one very cold day with an Aerostitch electric heated vest on. According to Aerostitch the vest draws 3.3 amps. I figured it was worth a try and the fuse would blow immediately if the vest overloaded it, but the vest worked for the entire ride.
 

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I'm not sure if the manual is right about the 2A max draw. I rode on one very cold day with an Aerostitch electric heated vest on. According to Aerostitch the vest draws 3.3 amps. I figured it was worth a try and the fuse would blow immediately if the vest overloaded it, but the vest worked for the entire ride.

I was told no mater what you plug into it the socket will only give a max of 2, so your vest would have been working at just over half power!
Did you notice any difference from using the vest on another bike, or did it fell like normal?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
It felt like the vest made full power. In fact I eventually turned it off because I was getting a little too toasty.
I think I'll investigate how the circuits are fused. 2A just doesn't seem right.
 

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It seems low to me as most heated gear draws above 2A and they specifically market the plug as being for that. But the manual says:



Although it says, "devices can be recharged, including heated jackets..." so maybe they are referring to battery-powered clothes. Seems like it is a translation issue to me though...
 

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Greetings folks!

However the fly-by-wire throttle is challenging. Even in the Rain Mode it is overly sensitive with too little resistance. It is nearly impossible to reach the cruise control button without tweaking the throttle and jerking the bike. I find myself having to reach over with my left hand to press the button so I can hold the throttle steady. Not good.
There is no friction in the throttle, so it has a very unnatural feel. I'll probably get used to it, but I've been riding motorcycles for over 50 years and this just doesn't feel right. Perhaps a stronger return spring is all it needs.


Otherwise, The Perfect Motorcycle. Mille Grazie MV!
I will agree with you on this. The one and only thing really that bothered me about the Turismo Veloce is the non-friction ride by wire throttle. During the same week I rode the TV800 and the BMW S1000XR. I own a Multistrada.

Of the three, all with TbW, the Multistrada is the only one that makes you believe you have a traditional cable opening throttle bodies as you twist the throttle. The BMW S1000XR requires extra input to get it going, and I really didn't like it - because it delays the engine response per throttle input. Yes, you get used to it, but I like the immediate response per minimal input I get on the Multistrada.

The Turismo Veloce, I felt the throttle being too light. And I used it [basically] only on Sport mode on my test ride, and it felt as in the mid-range the throttle movement with respect to engine response had a different ratio than at lower RPMs. It was a weird sensation, where the bike was almost uncontrollable in the fat portion of the torque curve - besides being light to input, with no friction as you described (and I agree), it seems smaller input gave more response at the mid range as if throttle input-to-response has a non linear algorithm (well, they all may have it, but it is really noticeable and strange on the TV, and especially in sport mode).

Going back to the Multistrada, it proves it can be done with TbW.

So I believe you should explore the Custom map and find just the right amount of throttle sensitivity and engine response that mimics a regular throttle cable. If I had a TV, that's what I would do... :) Evil Steve here on this board has tried several of these maps. He will volunteer his opinion on the matter, and his solution. I'm sure. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
You're right about the Mulitstrada TbW. I spent a week riding one and it never dawned on me that it was TbW.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I sent my seat off to Sargent in Jacksonville to modify (raise) the front half in order to make the seat more level. Yesterday I rode the bike with the modified seat installed. I'm very pleased with the result. I no longer keep sliding forward and down toward the tank. The seat is very comfortable and makes the ride much more pleasant.
Sargent did a pretty nice job, I would give their workmanship 4 stars out of 5. Total cost was around $375 with about a 4 week turn-around.
 
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