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Discussion Starter #1
Greeting all,

I thought I would introduce myself and share with you my new to me MV Agusta 175 CS. I bought the bike recently from Alex B. a member here I believe. It's a beautiful bike and it rides great. I'm in the Design business and have a thing for vintage (and new) Italian design. I still have much to learn about these great machines and I hope you all don't mind a bunch of newbi questions in the future.

All the best,

Tom
 

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Nice looking bike, congratulations
 

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oh my that beautiful congrats
enjoy
and welcome
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Entered the MV in the Dana Point Concours D'Elegance that was held today. Took home a 2nd place in class, not bad eh? Here are a few photos ...




 

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Nice looking bike and congrats.

Not to burst your bubble, but MV didn't manufacture any '56 CS's with the Disco Volante tank. If it's truly a '56 CS, someone bolted the Disco tank on the bike.

A '56 CS would look more like the attached photo.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Nice looking bike and congrats.

Not to burst your bubble, but MV didn't manufacture any '56 CS's with the Disco Volante tank. If it's truly a '56 CS, someone bolted the Disco tank on the bike.

A '56 CS would look more like the attached photo.
Wouldn't that bike be the '56 175 CSTL? I read somewhere that the Disco tank was optional up though '57 ... although I cannot confirm this.

 

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just beautiful mate
really really love that model
and congrats
 

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I'm no expert, but I have done a bit of reading on the CSS and CS Disco's. I'm sure there are a lot more experts on the subject.

These bikes have been argued over and over throughout the years, as it's one of the most "faked" MV's out there.

My understanding is the Disco Volante tank that appears on your bike was only produced in 1954, and in very limited numbers. I believe only 500 CSS's were ever produced, and a small number of CS's with telescopic forks were produced along side those in 1954 only (with the Disco tank). In 1955 the tank design changed and was never reproduced by the factory.

The photo you've attached of a 1956 CS seems to be a bike someone built. Again, the CSS's were only built in 1954 and all had "Earl's" type forks as shown in the photo. The Earl's front ends have been "faked" over the years also. Again, these bike bring big bucks so the counterfeiters are definately out there.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
These bikes have been argued over and over throughout the years, as it's one of the most "faked" MV's out there.
Thanks guys, does anyone know where concrete facts can be obtained about these bikes?
 

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Congratulations Tom... she looks awesome on the lawn and deserves the prize won, thank you so much for sharing. According to Moto Cyclismo D'epoca, a reliable source most would agree, the Disco Volante was indeed made in 1956 as well. Although it is in italian, I would be happy to post the article that was published in 1998, Number 5. I brought this particular issue from Imola myself, precisely because it featured the Disco Volante as its main focus.
 

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It all depends on what you call a 'Disco Volante'.

The bike that was original christened as such (by the press and general public i might add, not originaly MV) was the 1954 CSS or Camshaft SuperSport.

These bikes are very special and have almost exactly the same power as the over the counter racer version or Squalo. 14 HP verses 15 HP. The cylinder head is infact the same casting and can be identified by the horizontal inlet manifold bolt patern as opposed to the angled patern on the smaller valve head. These bikes also had a unique engine number starting with 402.

The other bike that has also become known as a Disco Volante is the 175 CS. This has the tele forks as opposed to the 'earles' type on the CSS. The engine tune is a lot softer at 11 HP. These used the standard 175 engine number sequence ie 472,473,474 etc, etc. This bike is often called the 'Discette' to seperate it from the more powerful version but it does have the funny shape fule tank.

Both bikes, along with many others that have been made over the years, have the 'Disco' shaped tank....however a funny shape tank does not a true Disco make!

The 175 was completly overhauled for 57' with the introduction of the Modello Sport, also known as a 175CS. This had very many changes over the earlier bikes but is often used to make copy Disco's or indeed Squalo's because it used the large fin head (in small valve state) and looks right.

At the end of the day it doesn't realy matter as long as the bike is being used.

Also remember a true Disco tank made by MV, from whatever bike, should be metal and not bloody fibreglass!!

I'm sure this will open a right old arguement but hey, it's been quite in here recently:naughty:

Dorian.:popcorn:
 

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Hi guys,

I have heard the term "Discette" but its unclear to me what it means. A "Disco" has (nowadays in N. America and some UK/Euro circles) become the generally-accepted nickname for an MV 175cc fitted with that unique "Disco Volante" tank form. Nothing more, nothing less.

When it comes to determining the facts about a "Disco", first inspect the tank. As Dorian said, if the tank is made of fiberglass or aluminum, you have a replacement tank. If it is made of steel, then it could be a real MV part. But do not stop there, move past the tank and look at other details.

I'm no expert... but digging into 50's period ads and magazines, and visiting museums to study actual examples of these bikes, for me has been much more reliable than what is written in Italian hobby magazines, or the mythology on the internet. Even the Italian 'experts' contradict each other often. I've learned not to make assumptions but to look at the evidence.

For certain MV displayed in 1953 (at the Salon in Milan) a pair of new red 175 Sport models, with telescopic forks, and the special tank shape never before seen on an MV or any other bike. Soon nicknamed "Disco Volante" by public and press, these machines had a new type Sport motor with 22mm carb, hairpin valve springs, large head, all the Sport features which would remain basically unchanged thru 1959. The MV Agusta C.S. Modello Sport 175 with Disco Volante tank was later called "1954 Success of the Year" on the cover of Motociclismo magazine (June 1955).

Sometime in 1954, the wonderful C.S.S. Super Sport variant was released. A CSS can be spotted by it's Earles forks, and came with a higher-spec motor including the larger 25mm carburetor. Externally the CSS is nearly indistinguishable from a 1954 CS Modello Sport (which had telescopic forks). Over the years these two sister models have been mixed up and confused by many. Still, both can be called "Disco Volante". Same tank!

IMHO the only genuine "Disco Volante" will be a 1954 175 MV Modello Sport or Super Sport. Personally I have found no proof that the Disco tank form was fitted by the factory after 1954. Many ads and photos exist from 1955 and 1956 showing the 175 Sport with the conventional gas tank, that became typical through 1959. Also in 1955 the "Squalo" was offered (also called CSS in both 1955 and 1956). So that would leave the CSS "Disco" a 1954 ONLY model.

Because the saucer tank increases the collector appeal and value of these bikes, approach buying any "Disco" a little cautiously. For a 1957-1959 bike, a Disco tank is not correct.

Machines represented as CSS Super Sport models should also be approached with care. It is believed that no more than 500 of the 1954 CSS variation left the factory. They are rare and desirable, and so the possibility of a fake is worth being aware of.

:devilsmok
Hope this is helpful
Ivan

PS - if you have a 175cc MV Agusta motor but the cases do not have a letter code suffix stamping (usually S or SS), you might have an EARLY motor. The letters started being used sometime in 1954. The T means Turismo and is most common. The S stamp usually means big hairpin valve spring head and cam, MB22 carb, external points, and more compression. The SS stamp usually means big hairpin valve spring head and cam, external points, big SSI25 carb, and even more compression. Obviously, watch out for "restamps".
 

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Here's a short paragraph that's published on the official MV Agusta Heritage site about the CS models from 1954-1956.

It basically states what I and others have stated.... The 1954 CS tank was unique (Disco), and was changed for 1955-1956.

The CS was a lot more available than the CSS, so I imagine bolting on a Disco Volante tank was much more common, as the fiberglass tanks are still available today. It's a shame people do such things, but a lot of people just don't care if it's real, BUT some do!

Regardless, it's a pretty bike, enjoy it. Just be wise if you ever decide to sell it, people who know these bikes will question you of its authenticity.
 

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Wouldn't that bike be the '56 175 CSTL?
No. The CSTL 175 was a derivative of the 1954 CST 175. The CSTL had a completely different frame, engine, tank, etc. Completely different bike altogether.

See below (taken from the official MV Agusta heritage site)
 

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No. The CSTL 175 was a derivative of the 1954 CST 175. The CSTL had a completely different frame, engine, tank, etc. Completely different bike altogether.
Yep. Frames look identical but do have subtle differences. The bikes do share some parts in common, including some motor parts (mostly internal), some fork parts, wheels and brakes, rear fender, and headlight.

It's like the differences between a base Mustang car, a Mustang GT, and a Mustang Shelby GT. :mouthwate Same basic platform, but VERY different.
 
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