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Greetings MV Agusta Team,

I finally got around to the New Member Introductions for this forum. I apologize for the delay and the length of this message in advance.

First, thank you all for the great information. I’ve been referencing the website for about 3 years now, joined 6 months ago, and finally posted something this week. You’ll understand the 3-year timeframe at the end of this intro.

The forum is a great resource with years of information/lessons learned and I’ve seen a lot helpful MV Agusta enthusiasts offering up their expertise, often with a little bit of worldly humor or jabbing attached.

Ok, now my story:

I’m in Honolulu, Hawaii USA. The “808” in my account name is an area code/phone number reference that is synonymous with Hawaii to locals. I’m originally from the Bay Area or San Francisco, California.

I have a 2007 F4 1000r Red/Silver with about 6,600 miles on it. What I think is a little unique is that Eraldo Ferracci (US Importer, Italian National Champion motorcycle rider/master mechanic, founder of Fast by Ferracci) personally autographed the tail section of my motorcycle because that was a requirement to complete the deal by the original owner. I’m the third owner. The motorcycle has traveled from Italy, imported to Pennsylvania, shipped to Alabama, sold to the second owner in Georgia, and then it was brought to Hawaii where I purchased it.

My other motorcycles are a 2011 Ducati Monster 796ABS and 2007 Vespa LX150 if that counts. My past motorcycles in my younger years included a 1985 Ninja, four different GSX-R 750s, a Yamaha 1986 RZV500R, and a 2000 Suzuki Hayabusa before an extended break from motorcycling.

Back to the F4, I bought the motorcycle in 2017 after falling in love when I saw it for sale on the internet ike many other people in this forum. It hadn’t been registered or ridden regularly and had been sitting in a gentlemen’s living room for years. I believe he said he would take it to track days once in while. I already had a Ducati Monster that I barely rode so it made no sense to buy this beautiful motorcycle. Some things don’t need to make sense so I bought the MV F4 after a week of talking with the owner. This is when the adventure started with this motorcycle.

After paying for and picking up the motorcycle, I was grinning inside my helmet for the first 15 minutes before the front brakes locked up while riding it home. Luckily, I was accelerating on a straightaway and there were no other vehicles behind me. I dragged my cycle out of traffic and was stuck on the side of the road with my super sexy bike. The previous owner drove out and brought tools to release the brake line pressure and pry the pads away from the front discs after it cooled down. He drove behind me as I rode home without using the front brakes. I should’ve taken this as a warning sign.

The minor setback didn’t deter me and I thought it was just bad brake fluid. The next day I inspected/cleaned the front brakes, changed the brake fluid, and bled the brakes. Everything seemed fine in the garage. I was anxious to get it back on the road so I wanted to test ride it around the neighborhood before dinner. I was driving slowly testing the brakes and everything was working fine. About 5 minutes later, I was going around a 2nd gear slow curve and the front brakes locked up again and this time it threw me down on my right side. I tried hanging on longer instead of letting go because I dreaded that beautiful bike touching the pavement. The tires had trend on them but since they were years old, I believe their condition contributed to the quick slide out. Needless to say, I didn’t make back for dinner and stayed in the hospital for 4 days with six cracked ribs, road rash, and some other minor injuries.

I didn’t want to look at the motorcycle for the first 3 weeks after the hospital because it would pain me more than the cracked ribs seeing the scraped fairings and broken parts.

I finally got my mind/body right and took inventory of everything I had to repair and replace. It took me about 6 months to get it “right” again.

Long story longer, I had only had the motorcycle a couple days so it was still unregistered and the title was under the previous owner who was nervous I was going to hold him liable for the accident. Maybe I could’ve. I couldn’t get a hold of him and when he finally felt confortable that I just wanted to straighten out the paperwork, it took 2 years to track down the title in Georgia since it was deregistered, was a piece of furniture in his living room for years, and then go thru the Hawaii registration process while paying all the late fees. What a mess! I finally registered it in the summer of 2019.

So after all the trouble I still didn’t ride it that much. My wife snapped my right mirror off with her car mirror when pulling too close in the garage and then we entered into the new COVID-19 new abnormal this year. Fixing the mirror turned into figuring how to take the bike apart to replace parking lights, to removing the catalytic mid-pipe, to arching the battery with a Battery Tender pig tail and then thinking it was the reason for the motorcycle not starting, that led to changing the battery, checking fuses/connections, changing the starter solenoid, changing general relay, finally figuring out it was disconnected fuel pump line inside the tank, working the fuel issues out, and researching/ordering/waiting with every step.

The forum has helped a lot. It seems as I fix one issue, another appears. I don’t think my air filter was ever changed…changed to BMC, modified the well nuts so they don’t fall into the intakes, had to find foil tape for air box, changed to Iridium plugs, replaced coolant, changed leaking fuel lines, replaced plastic quick disconnects, and a lot of trial and error stuff since I’m not a savvy mechanic. I’m currently waiting for quick disconnect thread seal to cure since it was had a slight drip after working on the fuel lines the last couple weeks. I may contribute to “how not to do some things” if I get this motorcycle running.

Bottom line, I’ve ridden the motorcycle a total of 400 miles in 3 years, have learned to have patience when working on my Italian beauty, and have a bond with my MV Agusta even though it’s brought me great amounts of frustration.

Thanks again to the forum members for the assistance as I move from issue to issue and hopefully get some saddle time in the near future.

Keep it Upright,
Donovan “Gonzo”
2007 F4 1000r
Honolulu, Hawaii USA
 

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Ah, a love affair with an Italian Mistress! Welcome to the forum, I hope you get to ride her lots, soon. Where do you go for rides in Oahu? Up Windward and back down the middle?
 

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Ah, a love affair with an Italian Mistress! Welcome to the forum, I hope you get to ride her lots, soon. Where do you go for rides in Oahu? Up Windward and back down the middle?
Aloha Surfer Dave,

Exactly, up through North Shore, stop for food, up/around to the Windward Side, and either thru the tunnel or around the Hawaii Kai south end.
 

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That is an awesome story and what makes it even better is your positive attitude throughout the entire processes! Welcome to the forum and if you ever come to California bring your bike, there's a lot of great places to ride to as you know being from SF.
 

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Aloha Surfer Dave,

Exactly, up through North Shore, stop for food, up/around to the Windward Side, and either thru the tunnel or around the Hawaii Kai south end.
Nice, dodging fallen coconuts as you go!
Post us a picture, esp the tail sig?
 

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Welcome to the family !!

Fly me to Hawaii and I will sort your bike out for you !!!
But seriously, did you find the front brake problem?
The front brake problem sounds like the relief port in the master cylinder was blocked...either by a mis-installed lever, and aftermarket lever that doesn't fit properly, or debris. When the fluid gets hot from braking it cannot expand into the reservoir, slowly applying the brakes until they lock. Most commonly caused by the lever slightly depressing the master cylinder piston at rest.
 
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Welcome to the forum.Sorry to hear about the accident.Yes your brake master cylinder will be the problem,either fit a new one or re-kit the original.
 

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That is an awesome story and what makes it even better is your positive attitude throughout the entire processes! Welcome to the forum and if you ever come to California bring your bike, there's a lot of great places to ride to as you know being from SF.
Thank you for the kind words and nice pectoral muscles on your picture. Yes, lived in the Bay Area so know there is great riding in the Napa/Lake Berryessa area and also lived in Central Cali around SLO, Santa Maria, so used to cruise Santa Barbara and Ojai on my Hayabusa watching out for deers at dust and CHP helicopters all the time. Just have to laugh sometimes, especially when it comes to a motorcycle not operating properly and all the craziness in the world this year.
 

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Welcome to the family !!

Fly me to Hawaii and I will sort your bike out for you !!!
But seriously, did you find the front brake problem?
The front brake problem sounds like the relief port in the master cylinder was blocked...either by a mis-installed lever, and aftermarket lever that doesn't fit properly, or debris. When the fluid gets hot from braking it cannot expand into the reservoir, slowly applying the brakes until they lock. Most commonly caused by the lever slightly depressing the master cylinder piston at rest.
Thank your for the offer...they just opened up the island for tourist that have negative COVID tests a couple days ago.

After the accident 3 years ago, I changed everything out. Front calipers, lines, pads, front master cylinder, and even the rear brake master and lines. I hadn't crashed a motorcycle in over 20 years and I was spooked! Peace of mind if you know what I mean. They seem to work now. Interesting you mentioned after market levers because it did and does have Moto Corse levers. I'll keep your tip in my hip pocket for future reference.

Thanks again.
 

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Nice, dodging fallen coconuts as you go!
Post us a picture, esp the tail sig?
Here are some pics to go with the intro:
IMG_1855.jpg

Stuck on the side of the road after front brakes locked up the first 15 minutes of ownership March 2017.

IMG_2312.JPG

Right side damage after low speed front brake lock throw down March 2017.

IMG_2836.JPG

After repairs July 2017…still needed right fork seal work and registration.

IMG_5312.jpg

Never ending work in progress October 2020.

481979

Picture of Eraldo Ferracci autograph on the tail section. Carbon tail cover with sticker work was summer project while figuring out why motorcycle wouldn't run.
 

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I also have a 2007 F4R although mine is still torn apart as I await a repaired intake cam to arrive (6 months now). Wonderful bikes but with some expensive issues. I had the bolts holding the drive sprocket to the intake came come loose and cause 8 bent valves, 4 cracked guides and a damaged cam lobe. All from the factory not using the mandatory thread locker on those two bolts! The exhaust cam sprocket WAS attached with thread locker. Mine failed around 12K miles so I highly advise you to pull the valve cover and check the 4 allen head screws holding the cam sprockets to the cams. Fairly easy to do now, before you have a failure. There are several documented cases of this happening with the 2007 models so it looks like someone at the factory was botching their job during engine assembly. Otherwise, fantastic bikes.

Eric
 

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I also have a 2007 F4R although mine is still torn apart as I await a repaired intake cam to arrive (6 months now). Wonderful bikes but with some expensive issues. I had the bolts holding the drive sprocket to the intake came come loose and cause 8 bent valves, 4 cracked guides and a damaged cam lobe. All from the factory not using the mandatory thread locker on those two bolts! The exhaust cam sprocket WAS attached with thread locker. Mine failed around 12K miles so I highly advise you to pull the valve cover and check the 4 allen head screws holding the cam sprockets to the cams. Fairly easy to do now, before you have a failure. There are several documented cases of this happening with the 2007 models so it looks like someone at the factory was botching their job during engine assembly. Otherwise, fantastic bikes.

Eric
Eric,

Sorry to hear about your 2007 challenges but appreciate the heads up. I took notes and will bring it up when I have the valves adjusted. Thank you !

Gonzo
 
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