MV Agusta Forum banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am seriously considering buying a 2004 750 Brutale, and have narrowed down my choice to this bike or a Ducati S2R.

That being said, the posts in the "trouble" thread are scaring the crap out of me. I don't have a ton of money, but more importantly, I just don't want to have a bike that is going to have recurring issues that are difficult to diagnose and solve. I have a good dealer i can get serviced by here in chicago (MCC) but some of these threads about SPU issues and constant stalling in traffic (we have a lot of that here in Chicago) etc are making me feel like I should go with one of the S2Rs that I have looked at. I am riding an 04 Brutale on Tuesday along with an 05 S2R. How many of these bikes have this problem and is it really as exceedingly difficult as what I read to get these things fixed if I am faced with an issue of stalling or hiccups or any of that? Should I just get a new SPU and a chip along with the bike and factor that into my offer? Thanks in advance for all of your help.
Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
968 Posts
It's very unlikely you'll have any stalling issues with a 750.

But yes, the SPU could be a problem if it hasn't had an updated replacement unit yet. I wouldn't let this stop you from buying an MV, however. You could factor it into your offer as you say but I wouldn't bother replacing the unit unless/until you observe any particular issues that point to the SPU.

All things considered a Brutale is going to cost you less to maintain than a Ducati.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,589 Posts
It's very unlikely you'll have any stalling issues with a 750.

But yes, the SPU could be a problem if it hasn't had an updated replacement unit yet. I wouldn't let this stop you from buying an MV, however. You could factor it into your offer as you say but I wouldn't bother replacing the unit unless/until you observe any particular issues that point to the SPU.

All things considered a Brutale is going to cost you less to maintain than a Ducati.
+1 Rents....a great succinct explanation
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
I just bought my 08 Brutale and I can't get enough, she is just one bad ass machine. I live in Vegas and yet to stall. Had her out on a couple of 106 degree days and she is just fine. I would go with a brutale, I use to have a Duc and I would never go back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,175 Posts
I am seriously considering buying a 2004 750 Brutale, and have narrowed down my choice to this bike or a Ducati S2R.
I've got an 06 Brute 750 and an 07 Ducati S4R.

I love both bikes.

If i had a Ducati S2R instead of the S4R - well i wouldn't because i would have sold the S2R as it is a waste of time compared to the Brute. But that's me.

This is just my take but it seems Monster owners buy a Monster because there is something about them they love. They aren't chasing specs or power, they just like the idea about having one and they have an absolute ball during ownership.

The Brute is a spec/power/thrasher bike. You don't get one to plod around on. You get one to ride it hard because that is where you feel the pure magic that is MV Agusta.

So the way i see it you need to decide what you want to get out of your riding experience. That will make your mind up.

As for costs, don't think for a second Ducati don't have their own issues. There is a major flaw in the new Streetfighter where the bike shuts off completely whilst riding. A new Ducati's tend to stall it's ass off constantly. If you take it back to Ducati and their answer is 'spend $3k on an exhaust and it'll fix the issue'. Fine if you buy the pipes. Not fine if you can't afford the pipes. I had 2 mates buy new Monsters and both had stalling issues. I was lucky, mine stalled twice but never again.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,589 Posts
...
The Brute is a spec/power/thrasher bike. You don't get one to plod around on. You get one to ride it hard because that is where you feel the pure magic that is MV Agusta.

So the way i see it you need to decide what you want to get out of your riding experience. That will make your mind up...
Nicely put Groper...:yo:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,179 Posts
Reliable bike. Extreme fun. First, the recommended mods...

Tune it and chip it properly (the Arrow mid-pipe is fine but you couldn't give me one of their chips) and you'll bump your mileage from low twenties to very high 30's. Any stalling issues will disappear and throttle response improvement will be magic as well.

Replace the crappy stock air filter with a BMC.

Your front suspension is less than ideal and more than a bit uncomfortable. I've talked to them all and most of the suspension tuners really don't know much about the Marzocchi forks so be careful about recommendations. As a rule of thumb, the more they want to charge you to make it work, the less they know. Ride it and find out what you like/don't like what works/doesn't work before you make any changes. Your weight, riding style, roads, track, etc. all make a difference. One size does not fit all. Turning adjusters will not really fix much of anything.

Rear suspension is no prize either. Some find the Sachs acceptable, others change shock to Wilbers or Ohlins. I wouldn't bother with the Wilbers.

Proper suspension setup will make a huge difference in comfort as well as handling. Some have had seat mods done. You may or may not find it necessary once the suspenders are improved.

Change oil, make sure the cooling system has been properly flushed and you're most of the way there. Use only a buffered silicate-free coolant.

Time for the fuel filter to be changed. As long as you're inside the tank the fuel lines should be replaced on a bike that old. Use approved parts only. Also a good idea to change the plastic fuel fittings to chromed brass as a precaution as the plastic ones have been known to break on rare occasion.

The Ducati parts on the sidestand are a cool mod, too, but hardly necessary.

Now, the long list of potential problems.

SPU problems may or may not happen on the 750's. If the turn signals start flashing randomly or if the bike will not shut off, it's a sign of problems in that area. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

IME, the reported electrical problems seem to correlate to aftermarket electrical system mods so I'd avoid replacement turn signals, alarms, anything other than a Battery Tender.

Barring abuse, the only reliability issue that bike has is the water pump seals. If it hasn't already been done, upgrade the shaft and the seals. MV Agusta blogspot has good info on that fix and the fuel pump/fittings issue as well.

So there you go. If you're in the Tetons, drop me a PM. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the great input:

I really appreciate all of these detailed suggestions and all of the specific information about the bikes and your experiences with them. I feel a lot better about the bike not having any reliability issues, and now the real test for me will be to ride it and make sure I feel comfortable and have fun on it. If the bike doesn't feel like a bucking bronco I will be most likely buying it. This is the first modern bike entering my current stable (there will be more soon), so I want to make sure I feel like it is versatile enough to enjoy and that when I ride within my own limits it is still a fun bike for me. Tomorrow is a big day, because the day will most definitely end with me knowing exactly what bike I want. I will be riding the S2R, the Triumph speed and/or street triple, and of course the MV. If I get the MV all of my friends at garage night on Wednesday are going to throw a fit. Almost all of my riding friends have multiple bikes, but I can't think of one of them that owns a modern MV Agusta. I will keep you posted on what happens tomorrow, and I am very excited!
Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
I really appreciate all of these detailed suggestions and all of the specific information about the bikes and your experiences with them. I feel a lot better about the bike not having any reliability issues, and now the real test for me will be to ride it and make sure I feel comfortable and have fun on it. If the bike doesn't feel like a bucking bronco I will be most likely buying it. This is the first modern bike entering my current stable (there will be more soon), so I want to make sure I feel like it is versatile enough to enjoy and that when I ride within my own limits it is still a fun bike for me. Tomorrow is a big day, because the day will most definitely end with me knowing exactly what bike I want. I will be riding the S2R, the Triumph speed and/or street triple, and of course the MV. If I get the MV all of my friends at garage night on Wednesday are going to throw a fit. Almost all of my riding friends have multiple bikes, but I can't think of one of them that owns a modern MV Agusta. I will keep you posted on what happens tomorrow, and I am very excited!
Rob
Rob,

I dont know how you ride or anything like that mate, But I took one of these 750's for a run yesterday, the thing was amazing. Compared to a Street Triple 675 R that I also took for a run, the steering feels slightly more lighter, for some reason you feel like your in a slightly more aggressive style of riding position.

The other thing I noticed is that the Brutale is much more sensitive on the throttle, I know this has been said a million times, I kind of like it, there would be some that don't. I was putting the thing around just below 5000rpm because the dealer who was with me wouldn't let me do more than the speed limit, but we got onto the freeway and after about 6k the speed really picks up quickly. You will definitely notice the difference between the trump and it. Good luck with the ride today mate!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
716 Posts
I just bought my 08 Brutale and I can't get enough, she is just one bad ass machine. I live in Vegas and yet to stall. Had her out on a couple of 106 degree days and she is just fine. I would go with a brutale, I use to have a Duc and I would never go back.
Nice to see another Las Vegan around here. Welcome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I rode the Brutale 750 and the Duc S2R back to back on Tuesday. I am picking up my new Brute on Saturday morning! great bike and is like nothing else I've ridden. Had to ride it twice with a ducati ride sandwiched in between. five minutes into that second ride I knew that I would be owning it (or vice versa?). Thanks for all the advice and I will be sure to post some pics of the bike after I get it.
Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,499 Posts
great, you're going to love it. I know I love mine :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Reliable bike. Extreme fun. First, the recommended mods...

Tune it and chip it properly (the Arrow mid-pipe is fine but you couldn't give me one of their chips) and you'll bump your mileage from low twenties to very high 30's. Any stalling issues will disappear and throttle response improvement will be magic as well.

Replace the crappy stock air filter with a BMC.

Your front suspension is less than ideal and more than a bit uncomfortable. I've talked to them all and most of the suspension tuners really don't know much about the Marzocchi forks so be careful about recommendations. As a rule of thumb, the more they want to charge you to make it work, the less they know. Ride it and find out what you like/don't like what works/doesn't work before you make any changes. Your weight, riding style, roads, track, etc. all make a difference. One size does not fit all. Turning adjusters will not really fix much of anything.

Rear suspension is no prize either. Some find the Sachs acceptable, others change shock to Wilbers or Ohlins. I wouldn't bother with the Wilbers.

Proper suspension setup will make a huge difference in comfort as well as handling. Some have had seat mods done. You may or may not find it necessary once the suspenders are improved.

Change oil, make sure the cooling system has been properly flushed and you're most of the way there. Use only a buffered silicate-free coolant.

Time for the fuel filter to be changed. As long as you're inside the tank the fuel lines should be replaced on a bike that old. Use approved parts only. Also a good idea to change the plastic fuel fittings to chromed brass as a precaution as the plastic ones have been known to break on rare occasion.

The Ducati parts on the sidestand are a cool mod, too, but hardly necessary.

Now, the long list of potential problems.

SPU problems may or may not happen on the 750's. If the turn signals start flashing randomly or if the bike will not shut off, it's a sign of problems in that area. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

IME, the reported electrical problems seem to correlate to aftermarket electrical system mods so I'd avoid replacement turn signals, alarms, anything other than a Battery Tender.

Barring abuse, the only reliability issue that bike has is the water pump seals. If it hasn't already been done, upgrade the shaft and the seals. MV Agusta blogspot has good info on that fix and the fuel pump/fittings issue as well.

So there you go. If you're in the Tetons, drop me a PM. ;)
Hey EmmVee, when you say tune and chip are you talking about putting in a power commander and chucking it on the dyno? I have an '03 and I've been trying to decide whether to do this or not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I myself have just bought a 750 brutale: what a great feeling it gives me, just riding an mv agusta with a great sound, wonderful looks and more than enough power! Choose carefully...
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top