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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone else following the hype over the yet to be released new Kawasaki Ninja H2?
http://ninja-h2.com
Most of the so called "experts" and media types are predicting a one liter or larger supercharged in-line four cylinder, (based on the Tokyo show engine and patted applications). However, the original H2 was a 750 triple. With the success of the three cylinder engines from Triumph, MV and Yamaha along with the exploration of this new displacement segment between the 600 middle weights and the liter bikes I'm more inclined to think it's going to be a 750ish forced induction triple.

Silhouette looks interesting.



Whachatinks?
 

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apparently Kawasaki released a soundclip of the engine and from that its apparent that its forced induction. I would assume that if they are calling it the H2, then they will be going the same route as the old H2....a 750 Triple, like you say.
Sounds very interesting. :)
 

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IMO If you listen to the sound teaser it sounds like an inline 4. Just doesn't have that nice triple sound. Also they are comparing it to the big bore hyper sports of Kawasaki's past in the forth teaser. I am expecting a 1000cc+ supercharged engine.
 

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I read the supercharged engine shown last year was an inline 4 with very similar castings to their current 600 engine?

I was thinking it would be around an 800cc supercharged with the power of the ZZR1400 as that bike is getting on now and due for a replacement but that image suggests differently?

Can't understand why they would make it into a Superbike, that would remedy the ZX10R redundant and would Kawasaki turn their back on Superbike racing just as they have found success? And why make a 1000cc supercharged bike, isn't the current one quick enough? Selling a bike with 250-300hp will quickly grab the attention of the EU in Europe and they will impose restrictions, France already has a 100hp limit doesn't it, and the manufacturers have a gentlemens agreement already of limiting the speed to 186mph?

If it is a supersports bike as it appears in the picture I think it maybe something like a 600cc which produces power similar to a 1000? Following the trend in the car world of making smaller, lighter, more economical and green engines which make the same power as the old 1600 and 2000 they replaced?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
According to www.ninja-h2.com which states; “It captures the spirit of the 1972 750cc Kawasaki Mach IV H2,” hence my comment in the first post.
You are correct about that ZXR7 being designated H2 as well but I haven’t seen that reference yet on the website.
You will note though that your H2 is also a 750. :)
 

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Well I hope it's a triple Stephen but hints are at a four cylinder four stroke. Would love it as a supercharged 2 stroke triple....that is why I posted the ZXR...and yes I saw the initial statement re the original H2 (of which I have over 70 bikes)....I would be a buyer for a stroker but I fear that will never happen in today's world. Kawasaki unfortunately have a history of not putting bikes in production, a good example is the triple wankel 700
 

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I read the supercharged engine shown last year was an inline 4 with very similar castings to their current 600 engine?

I was thinking it would be around an 800cc supercharged with the power of the ZZR1400 as that bike is getting on now and due for a replacement but that image suggests differently?

Can't understand why they would make it into a Superbike, that would remedy the ZX10R redundant and would Kawasaki turn their back on Superbike racing just as they have found success?
 

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If they really wanted the market, they'd force induce a 400 to match a 600-750. That would meet emissions, ease gas prices and keep insurance dollars in check.
 

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It won't keep insurance in too much of a check since all companies have a qualifier for engine induction type in one form or another.
 

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So the rumour mill is a churning, said to be a 1000cc 4 cylinder with 225hp +

I see good and bad coming out of all this, the good being this will filter down to smaller bikes with bigger bike power but greater economy and emissions to keep the tree huggers happy. Light weight fast bikes, i'm liking the sound of that.

But on the flip side shouting off about big power figures only attracts the party poopers at the EU who with their Health & Safety steam roller seem to think we need to be protected from ourselves. They do want european harmonisation which at the moment means lifting the 100bhp limit imposed in France in 2016 as its been proved that it makes no difference to safety/fatalities but if the rumours are true and the Kawasaki is north of 200bhp then I can easily see them reversing this and bringing the rest of us in line with France :(
 

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Ackers downsizing is what the car industry is doing since a few Years.
Smaller displacement, more power, higher revs.
The other side of the coin is the lost reliability.
Gear box, engine failures on modern cars are of raising concern at road side assitance reports.
And sorry, but I can't see a 1.4 litre charged engine with 200hp last 500.000 miles.
Now the bike industry is likely to be heading in the same direction.
Fast small capacity rockets with limited live time.
If they weigh less with all the electronic aids, chargers, intercoolers etc is not prooven yet.
Say if it breaks than through it in the garbage Your dealer has a new one waiting for You.
 

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I have a feeling there will be a lot of ink on the roads after this bike is released.

Then again, I have also heard rumors that it will be a track-only beast.
 

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Ackers downsizing is what the car industry is doing since a few Years.
Smaller displacement, more power, higher revs.
The other side of the coin is the lost reliability.
Gear box, engine failures on modern cars are of raising concern at road side assitance reports.
And sorry, but I can't see a 1.4 litre charged engine with 200hp last 500.000 miles.
Now the bike industry is likely to be heading in the same direction.
Fast small capacity rockets with limited live time.
If they weigh less with all the electronic aids, chargers, intercoolers etc is not prooven yet.
Say if it breaks than through it in the garbage Your dealer has a new one waiting for You.
It's a throw-away society we live in. Manufacturers don't make as much money when their product works for many many years.

Most Brits and Europeans I've met talk smack about how large displacement American engines don't make that much power. All the while their little four-bangers are so high strung, they pop before they see six digits (without expensive maintenance and repairs). Compare the amount of old American vehicles on the road compared to old European vehicles.
 

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The engines weren't generally the problem on classic European cars it was the bodywork would rust away around them :laughing: it wasn't unheard of new fiats to be rusting from new and failing their first mot check after only 3 years for structural decay or British cars to be left out in the rain bare metal before being painted ;)
 

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HAHA! This is true. All the salt used on the roads doesn't help.

As for the second part, all hail British Leyland!
 

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Hahaha they were the best ;) the paint shop was in a different building down the road, so the bare metal cars were loaded on to a transporter and covered in salty winter road grim then left to rust while the painters were on strike for a couple of days before they painted over it lol
 
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