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Just wanted to publicly thank Dorian for rendering me sterling assistance on the weekend re spares & advice for the Flying Ant.

I spent an enjoyable few hours with both Lois and Dorian as we talked (and looked at) bikes. Came away with a much needed spare engine for my 2-bolt 125 TR only a few hundred numbers away from the existing one.

I would urge any of you Classics guys and girls out there to join the MV Club of GB to help keep these superb bikes on the road. It's a good little mag and the spares fund is second to none.

Now to write that promised piece for the mag.....

Oh, Oepie you came up in our conversation btw. Both you and I are nominated as the only known examples of individuals crazy enough to ride these machines on a daily basis. Tell me it ain't so, there must be more of us out there.....

Cheers one and all.

Sheriff of Nothing
 

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Lois and Dorian are good folk. As for the MV Club magazine I look forward to receiving your article and photo's.

Regards

Jimbo (Magazine Editor)
 

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I can second Dorian's assistance and knowledge regarding classic MVs.

As for daily transport .. my bikes are purely pleasure although when summer comes and the new registration scheme for classic bikes is implemented (limited use per year and a log book) then the occassional trip to work may be in order.

Hi Jimbo ... congrats on your first magazine although I do wish you had edited my article on my semi famous ... a bit better. The semi famous bit was ownership by Nick Mason of Pink Floyd fame.

cheers

Russ
 

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Lois and Dorian are good folk. As for the MV Club magazine I look forward to receiving your article and photo's.

Regards

Jimbo (Magazine Editor)
+1 except I would change that to fantastic folk! :)

Dorian/Lois if are reading this - I hope you get to the Novegro Scambio and if you do, please do let me know, I would love to catch up and have lunch (on me of course) as thank you for all your superb help, prompt advice, efficient service with my classics :)

Cheers
Rob
 

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Hi Guys.

Well, i don't know what to say, except THANKS for all your kind words.

Trust me, i really does make a difference, especialy on mornings like this when i got back at 2 am from a trip to get spares from the club stores!

Most of all we have to keep these wonderful old MV's on the road where they belong..........not just as some over polished display item that never turns a wheel. Woops, sorry, going off on a tangent there:).

Rob, i will drop you a email re Novegro this week.

All the best and thanks again.

Dorian.
 

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I haven't posted in a while, but I completed the Giro d'California on my 1956 175 MV I purchased almost a year ago. The bike was a stunner on the outside, but a bit of a mess internally and Dorian deserves a bunch of credit, so THANKS! I had only put 8 actual miles and that was in 3 rides in maybe 4 months as each ride was proceeded with a tear apart...So I wasnt expecting to do so well as it ran perfectly for the entire race.

I am the one with the Ducati jacket:
http://www.thecreeper.net/giro6/4-tuesday/imagepages/image36.htm

Dorian- thanks for the parts, and even more important the measurements for this and that and general transfer of knowledge. I would not have been able to accomplish my goal of running in the Cali Giro if not for your help. Thanks to your wife as well as she is just great with getting the parts out !

ALSO: Dorian's showcased in the latest issue of Italian Motor magazine (if you haven't seen it...get it):
http://www.italianmotormagazine.com/ITALIAN_MOTOR/Current_issue.html

Cheers,
Jason
 

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Cheers Jason.

That's exactly what i was talking about...........get the things out and ride em!

I was hoping to keep the magazine artical thing quite......now the cat is well and truely out of the bag:laughing:

All the best.

Dorian.
 

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Yeah, there's always time for a cup of tea, good advice and a few wild bike stories at Dorian's place!

I'm glad you keep the Ant running, Jon. London would be a duller place without it.
 

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Sorry Russ,

The current issue of the mag was done at breakneck speed, due to a number of reasons, and Jeni the management team and I were up against a really tight schedule. We also had to trial running the construction of the mag via a graphics artist who done us proud. Hopefully the next edition will allow us a little more preparation time. Lame excuse but the honest truth.

Really appreciate your input into the last issue, to be honest without your support, articles and photo's there would not have been a magazine at all this time.

So I am looking for even more from you and the Aussie boys and girls for the next edition.

Cheers (and promising to do better)

Jimbo

MV Owners Club of GB Magazine Editor
 

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I know the problems associated and encountered when doing a club magazine as I was the editor for the local DOC for a few years. Even had an edition where the cover pic was a Kawasaki instead of the classic Ducati I had planned (the layout was done by someone else). Brother, did I get some grief about that.
 

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Russ/Jimbo

I enjoyed the 'semi-famous' and '850SS' articles a great deal. It's always good to learn more about the classic 4Cs from the seventies. Thanks to both of you!

Russ... Regarding your search for history relating to Nick Mason's ownership: Here in the UK, one can (for a nominal fee), request information from the DVLA regarding the ownership history of a bike on their database - so long as you are the current owner of the bike, and you have a valid reason for doing so.

I recently enquired of them as to the origins of my own '750SS' - for the purposes of agreed value insurance - and they sent me everything they had on the bike and its ownership history. I was hoping to find evidence of its 'Sport' origins somewhere amongst the paperwork, but, alas, there was none. It would appear that so far as the UK authorities are concerned my bike has always been an 'SS' - even on its point of import!?

However, having read the proclamations of 'those in the know' and various MV Agusta 'gurus', I'm reliably informed that the 750SS doesn't actually exist. Ha! The mystery deepens!
 

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Steve.

If your bike does not exist, then you will not be needing the bits it put in the post to you this morning:)

Dorian.
 

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Thanks for that info although I'm not sure if they can help as the bike was never registered in Nick's name. I'm not even sure if he even had ownership papers. Could you forward contact details re the DVLA please.

I also just received confirmation of the bike being painted in pschodelic colours;
"Upon seeing the bike he could not believe his eyes. The cylinder head had been painted blue, the cylinders orange and the crankcase red!! He's not sure but the rest of the bike could have been similarly treated....all hand painted. Apparently they had been 'high' on cocaine one night and thought it would look better that way!"

cheers

Russ




For those who don't get the MVOGB magazine here is the story in full.

my*semi*famous*MV Agusta America

Living in Australia about the only reason for joining the MVOGB is for the spares scheme or more precisely when you need a part which you can’t find anywhere except from the MVOGB, which is exactly why I joined. *Joining the MVOGB is, however, not my first contact with MV Agusta and England.* Around two years ago I purchased a classic 4C MV, an America ex England.* What’s interesting about this particular bike is it’s provenance.

The history of an America is pretty brief.* Two Americans, Chris Garville & Jim Cotherman, convinced the powers at MV Agusta to create a bike primarily for the American market, hence the name, as the 750 Sport wouldn’t meet the US requirements for registration.* This was done in quick time with the first Americas appearing in 1975 and a planned production run of 400 or so bikes a year. *As most will know, the America didn’t come close to sales expectations with many bikes languishing in showrooms for years and some even being returned to the factory.* These were either sent to other markets such as England, Australia, Germany or converted to the 850 SS, Boxer, Monza or Super Daytona (take your pick as they are basically the same bike) by either the factory, importer or at the request of the owner.

My particular bike was one of those sent to England.* Before leaving the factory, it was ‘tweaked to impress’ *(at a guess it was a press and possibly potential buyers demo bike) and as such, was accompanied by either two MV factory mechanics or one mechanic and a pr person (not sure which).* Obviously the pr person was there to promote the bike while the mechanics task was to fetter the bike after each test ride/road test to extract the absolute best performance from the bike.* It was claimed to be the fastest 750 MV in England at the time.* This claim was by some MVOGB officials*who new*and was later verified by Richard Boshier (of Solo Motorcycles and previously SGT Superbiking) in a telephone conversation in 1996.*

Apparently the engine* was built using a 1975 crank carrier, 600 heads reprofiled to America specifications, used two base gaskets (to reduce compression back to 10:1), ignition timing set to 46 degrees fully advanced and used two Monza inlet cams (one inlet and one exhaust).* I haven’t yet verified any of this plus the bike has also had work to the engine since it’s arrival on English shores by both SGT Superbiking and the Kays.* By the time it arrived in Australian it sported Brembo brakes, braided brake lines, Magni single seat, Magni exhaust, Magni chain drive conversion, a full fairing, no indicators and a respray (no badges or decals on the bike).*

The next interesting provenance of this particular bike is the first owner, none other than Nick Mason, world renowned car enthusiast and drummer of Pink Floyd.* Nick parked the bike in his London pad along with a few other classic bikes such as AJS 7R’s, BSA Goldstars’s, Matchless G50’s etc.* There is however no record of Nick owning, registering or for that matter even riding the bike. *The first documentation is ‘notification of sale’ papers dated August 1979 in the name of Buggane Music Ltd, a company owned by Dave Enthoven who was also a good friend of Nick and apparently the road manager for Roxy Music, UK Squeeze and Emerson, Lake and Palmer.
Dave Enthoven sent the bike to SGT Superbiking for a service with the intention of putting it on the road.* The first registration of the bike is also August 1979 when it received the plates CMO 333V (which I have sitting in a box in the shed). SGT Suprbiking then acquired the bike before selling it to Tom King in late 1982.* A couple of months later the bike was again sold, this time to Stephen Griffiths who’s brother, David, raced at the TT.* The brothers also inherited a collection of exotic road bikes which, along with the America, were displayed at Stamford Hall, Leicestershire.

Frank Graham, the previous owner to me, bought the bike in 1984 (the bike did spend a short time in the hands of Bob Power, Brisbane, Australia, before ending up in my shed), said that by the time he got the bike from the Griffith brothers, a deal that was done in a car boot by the way, it had a 750 Sport tank fitted (Nick preferred it to the America tank).* It was Frank who fitted the standard America tank, braided brake lines, Magni pipes, along with a general tidy up.* During a rebuild some purple paint was found in a hard to get to place adding some weight to the story that the bike was once purple, a reminder of the pshcyadelica era of Pink Floyd.

In correspondence with Bob, Frank made a comment*“Obviously he’s not going to get down to scratching it* on the A591”.* Since then Frank has received a photo of the bike cresting Lukey Heights, Phillip Island, Australia which apparently put a smile on his face.* I’d like to say the bike was brilliant but it wasn’t showing signs of frame flex in the rear end when pushed which, to say the least, is a bit disconcerting.* The prospect of throwing an expensive and effectively, at least for me, irreplaceably bike down the road did curtail my enthusiasm just a tad.

Frank on his regular runs along the A591 also experienced the rear end wobbles.* “On long fast bends she has a habit of starting to sway with*the weight of the motor over bumps and swells when laid well over at 90 MPH plus, ... some with authority say open the throttle further and she'll pull out of it, .... DON'T !!! .... I tried this many times and almost took her into the fields !!, ..... only way out of it I found was to go into long fast bends faster than you would normally like, ..... Say plus 10/15 MPH ......... and she'll stay settled right through, ........ I'm not giving advice here, only stating what I found to be best along the A591 in Cumbria where I rode her most”*.* It would be fair to say that this bike isn’t a trailer queen.

Apparently, when doing a Magni chain drive conversion the frame should also be strengthened to reduce the rear end flex.* Albert Bold has been good enough to send some pics of the necessary work to the frame.* Others have indicated that the tyres can be the cause of these wobbles but new tyres were fitted prior to riding the bike in Australia suggesting the problem is related to the frame.* My intention is to strengthen the frame along with getting the bike resprayed, the seat upholstered, decals and badges added to the tank and fit a Magni quarter fairing (the engine is just too stunning to have hidden behind a full fairing).* Then it’s time to play on some very motorcycle friendly roads not too far from my Melbourne home.* Oh, and of course, spend some more time on the track.


Any assistance in verifying or otherwise the bikes ownership by Nick Mason or the bike being ‘the fastest 750 MV in England at the time’*would be appreciated.

ciao
 

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Sorry Russ,

The current issue of the mag was done at breakneck speed, due to a number of reasons, and Jeni the management team and I were up against a really tight schedule. We also had to trial running the construction of the mag via a graphics artist who done us proud. Hopefully the next edition will allow us a little more preparation time. Lame excuse but the honest truth.

Really appreciate your input into the last issue, to be honest without your support, articles and photo's there would not have been a magazine at all this time.

So I am looking for even more from you and the Aussie boys and girls for the next edition.

Cheers (and promising to do better)

Jimbo

MV Owners Club of GB Magazine Editor
When was this issue sent out? I haven't got mine :(
 

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Steve.

If your bike does not exist, then you will not be needing the bits it put in the post to you this morning:)

Dorian.
Ha! Cheers Dorian. The discount spares are too good a bargain to miss! :mouthwate

On the subject of the 750SS: I came across this leaflet recently which offers such a beast for sale in Stuttgart in the seventies. I'm beginning to believe my own bike may be one of these 'dealership specials'!

Jacob Dyck (..its former long-term owner - whom you may know by his 30yr UK Club membership?) claims it was raced in its early life, and that its long alloy tank is definitely a 'works' item. In support of its competition past, I also have a spare shaft-drive casing/unit for it which has been widened in order to allow for the fitment/clearance of wider tyres.
 

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ALL members, where ever in the world they are should receive the Mag.

May i suggest you drop our membership secretary a line as i think there might have been a cock up.

Linda Frier [email protected]

Dorian.
 
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