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Don't see how they can claim it doesn't compress the suspension when its obvious that it does this. So i can't see any benefit such as saving fork seals. The same drawback for all systems like this still requires one to bolt anchors through the floor in a stationary position. At least Pit Bull trailer restraints don't compress ones suspension. Not seeing any advantages with this than the standard Baxley shock and d-rings. Still think the PitBull restraint would be the way to go if transporting sportbikes. May be different for quad and dirt bikes though.
 

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I think it's a pretty cool idea, but then I'm not worried about how little it compresses the suspension. It obviously does, but not near as much as standard tie downs from the clip ons or handle bars. I think it would be most beneficial in the bed of a truck rather than in a trailer. Lets fact it, once the bikes are in the trailer, you usually don't move around between them so the straps are no big deal. I can tow 6 bikes in my trailer and so far the best system is the Condor/baxley. They work with any bike, any size. I've found that attaching the tie downs closer to the rear of the bike and pulling the bike down and forward into the chock works exceptionally well. Much better than using the canyon dancers or cycle cinch attachment across the clipons.

I like the pitbull system too. But if you haul different bikes, you need a different axle pin for each one and the system itself is pretty expensive.

I'm going to order a set or two and give them a try.
 

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The best solution I know of is tyre downs http://www.kyaracing.com.au/ plus a second set of tie downs for the front as a backup with the bike rolled into a self supporting stand such as the Ventura bike stand http://www.ventura-bike.com/products/bikestand/bs006~s.aspx (note: tyre downs are not suitable for all bikes as exhausts and rear mudguards can get in the way, so check before you buy)

All you do is wheel the bike onto the bike stand, go an get your tie downs and fix the front and back. The rear tyre (primary) 'tie down' puts no load on any suspension and the front is used as a back up just in case so only puts a small load on the front suspension.

Quick, easy and only needs one person.

The 'Canyon dancer' style (http://www.canyondancer.com/) are not a good primary tie down as they can break/bend clipons, damage grips and switch gear and I've read that they can also distort a frame.

For those who say you only need one set of tie downs, that's true until one part fails or is not secured correctly (it happens) and then you have a damaged bike.

Another convenient trick is to replace all the hooks etc with caribiners (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carabiner), sourced from a climbing shop. They make for a strong easy to use attachment device. Only need the cheap ones.
 

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In a word, they are brilliant. First, they are adjustable so you can compress the suspension as much or as little as you like. It has no effect on how well the bike is supported. Because of the way the unit attaches to the rear sets, tie downs are not necessary. I suppose you could use them if you are a belts and suspenders sort of guy.

The two little attachment plates are very unobtrusive and easily mount to the floor of a trailer or truck bed. You don't store the cinch on the mounting plates. They snap in and out in seconds.

They are exceptionally well made. Very good attention to detail. They even come with a canvas bag to carry and store them in.

Very easy to use. Anchor them in place, roll the bike in between them and let the bike rest on its side stand. Attach the right side cinch first then the left side. Lift the lever to snug the cinch down and you are done. The bike will sit upright, not on its side stand.

They are adjustable. They fit any sport bike with rear sets from 13"-17" off the ground.

If you transport your bike in the back of a truck, I can't imagine a better system. Not having to fuss with tie downs and attachment points is a real joy.

The pit bull system is nice, but it is expensive and bike specific. Plus, you have to bolt a huge ass plate on your floor.

I've been using the Condor sport bike chocks with great success. But you still need tie downs and in a trailer, you have to remove them to gets bikes parked in front of them out of the trailer. Plus they are more expensive.

Those are the systems I've used and the moto cinch is a game changer. Once I sell the two Condor chocks I have, I'll buy another two sets of these.
 

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The idea of using the rearsets as an attachment point doesn't impress me as I doubt the rearsets are designed for the loads a trailered bike would put on them especially when encountering a large bump.

You should ALWAYS have two independent sets of tie downs just in case there is a failure (attachment devise, attachment point, fitment, human stuff up, etc).

Race bikes and many track bikes (which are 'always' trailered) don't have a side stand which adds an extra degree of difficulty to securing the bike.

Don't break a rear set or getting home could be a problem (speaking about track days here where a minor off can result in a broken footpeg/rearset)

Think I'll stick with the Ventura style stand (just wheel the bike in and then get the tie downs), the 'tyredown' and another set of tie downs as back up.
 

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I haven't done the math, but if the rear sets will support my full weight going over bumps, I don't see why they won't support tension on them in the trailer.

Also, you don't need the side stand. You can sit on the bike and reach down and pick the cinches up off the floor and put them on the rear sets. (I did that with the Aprilia RS250)

My purpose posting this was not to convince anyone to change the way he secures his bikes, but to give an honest objective review to MrDon003.

I have never used the tyre down, tie downs, and a ventura stand combo so I can't comment on how effective it is. It certainly sounds like it works. I've only used the methods described above. I have also used Pingle chocks, soft ties, and the handlebar attachment mechanism but they are the worst way to tie down the bike. The cheapest for sure, but they do a lousy job and they really do compress the forks.

For ease of use, and stability this is the best I've tried so far. For convenience moving bikes in and out of a multi bike trailer, nothing I'm aware of could be easier. Also because of their adjustability, they are not bike specific. You can use them with any bike with rear sets or foot rests. I rolled a Suzuki SV650, and an Aprilia into the truck and with out moving cinches secured those two bikes also.

I'd rather not let this get into a "what's the best wax/oil/tire" type thread. So unless asked specifically about the moto cinch system and my experience with it, I won't be saying anything else.
 

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I haven't done the math, but if the rear sets will support my full weight going over bumps, I don't see why they won't support tension on them in the trailer.

Also, you don't need the side stand. You can sit on the bike and reach down and pick the cinches up off the floor and put them on the rear sets. (I did that with the Aprilia RS250)

My purpose posting this was not to convince anyone to change the way he secures his bikes, but to give an honest objective review to MrDon003.

I have never used the tyre down, tie downs, and a ventura stand combo so I can't comment on how effective it is. It certainly sounds like it works. I've only used the methods described above. I have also used Pingle chocks, soft ties, and the handlebar attachment mechanism but they are the worst way to tie down the bike. The cheapest for sure, but they do a lousy job and they really do compress the forks.

For ease of use, and stability this is the best I've tried so far. For convenience moving bikes in and out of a multi bike trailer, nothing I'm aware of could be easier. Also because of their adjustability, they are not bike specific. You can use them with any bike with rear sets or foot rests. I rolled a Suzuki SV650, and an Aprilia into the truck and with out moving cinches secured those two bikes also.

I'd rather not let this get into a "what's the best wax/oil/tire" type thread. So unless asked specifically about the moto cinch system and my experience with it, I won't be saying anything else.
Sounds good to me Carl, please be a gent and take some pics man, and post them of coarse. Personnely I think it is a good system as the bike does not wobble around which is what would otherwise have added strain on the rearsets. Not wanting this to turn into a shit fight either, but I am ever curious to learn.
Thanks mate
 

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My worry with the Cinch system would be breaking the rearset.
The rearsets on my bike look to be cast aluminium and could break easily.
I would not like to load them up too much.
Surely the manufacturer has looked into that and they would be okay????
Just my observation.
 

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I'll post some pictures for you Dons.

I'm about as positive as I can be that you are not going to break your rear sets. When they fasten down the dirt bikes in the video they really pull down on them. I assume it is not a problem on dirt bikes since guys jump 20 feet in the air with them and land standing on the foot rests. I weigh about 170 and riding on the track I spend very little time actually sitting on the bike. Most of my weight is born by the rearsets.

The part of the moto cinch that goes over the foot rest and agains the rear set is covered with a heavy urethane. A strap wraps around the rearset to keep the cinch from sliding off it. There is very little pressure on it.
 

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The best way to transport a bike is to ride it, duh!
 

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Take your bike out for a ride. Stand on the foot rests. Bounce up and down a little. If they break, then you should be worried about this system. If they don't you would probably be ok.

I'll post here if I have any problems with it.

Thanks though for bringing them to my attention.
 

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I think there is a big difference between standing on the foot-pegs ridding the bike and using them to tie down the bike as far as stress and load goes.
 

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Stress and Load are just that, stress and load...doesn't matter if it's my 275 USDA Pounds fully dressed track weight standing on those pegs doing very high speed suspension compressing turns and dips that bottom out my forks and shock, or if it's essentially a static load in a trailer with a compliant suspension.

In short..no worries.
 
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