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Let me first apologize to probably Donsy for more then likely putting this post in the wrong category. I seem to do that a lot.

Can anyone share any tips on how to clean the discoloring shown in these pics? I'm assuming it's just normal blemishes that form from an 8yr old bike. This is the only cosmetic flaw on the bike, and it'd be great to be able to polish it up.

Thanks!
 

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I'd try some aluminum polish first to see if that helps. If not, you might have to use some wet/dry sandpaper on the finish to remove the marks. Not sure if those parts are anodized or not, but sanding will remove the coating and you'll need to keep them polished.

Lots of motorcycles have a clear coat applied over polished aluminum and over time moisture gets under the clear coat causing corrosion that you can't clean. That's why you need the wet/dry sandpaper to remove the coating to access the underlying metal. I'd use a 600-800 grit paper to avoid scratching the metal.

Eric
 

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Before you sand, Use a dremel and some metal polish compound...Go slow and even...it will look awesome...Be patient!
 

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Leave it alone. The only real way to fix it permanently is to remove, have the anodizing stripped, then polish and have it reanodized. Polishing it in its current state will only last for a month or so before it oxidizes again.

Unless you are ok with polishing it with aluminum polish every month or every other month.
 

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Perhaps a combination of the polish then a light thin coat of oil to protect it from the elements but you will have to do it everytime you wash the bike.
 

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Try using Solvol Autosol to polish it and then use a clear laquer spray to finish which should achieve what you want, it will never be as good as the 'proper' job described beforehand but should give you an acceptable standard if you are careful. Remember to mask up around it well and use two or three very light coats of laquer and not go heavy handed.
 

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Try using Solvol Autosol to polish it and then use a clear laquer spray to finish which should achieve what you want, it will never be as good as the 'proper' job described beforehand but should give you an acceptable standard if you are careful. Remember to mask up around it well and use two or three very light coats of laquer and not go heavy handed.
I was thinking much the same. Any number of methods to clean up the corrosion would work. I like the dremel tool and metal polish idea best (sounds pretty easy)......followed by a very good cleaning. Finally, spend 20 minutes taping up the entire area, and 20 seconds applying a couple of very light coats of clear satin acrylic spray.

As you are already focused on the problem, you'll be very aware of any ongoing degradation that might occur. My guess is this repair should last a long time, and cost next to nothing.
 

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There are also metal protectants, AMSOil makes a couple, that come to mind. For corrosive air environment, like near an ocean.

Polish with whatever works for you...good suggestions have been made here...and spray with an anticorrosive spray.
 

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If it were me......, I'd make a note of the 'Settings' (turns ,clicks..,etc) on each of the fork caps.
I'd support the bike taking the 'weight' off the front.
Then 'one at a time' I'd remove one fork cap and work on it separately (away from the bike).

You can carefully remove the 'coating' as described in previous posts ......., if it is anodised you can remove this with 'caustic soda' ( be very careful and wear rubber gloves as it IS 'caustic'!) and go gently.
Clean up and re-lacquer then re fit to the bike and repeat for the other cap.

If you have 'disturbed' the fork settings during this process then re set as per your previous notes.
Brian.
 

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corroded aluminum.......

1st its anodized......it doesn't fall off

you're going to want to save all the sharp edges or it will look like shit forget the Dremel

as Brian said count your settings.....

as Joe said "send it to the platers, have it stripped and re anodized"

amongst other things I restore high end single barrel trap guns mostly Ithacas.......there are no short cuts......its the right way or you end up with a POS

my 7E is identical to Annie Oakley's (except for stock length) and has 6 colors of gold on it

my 6E was engraved and inlaid by Rudolph Kornbrath......look him up......supposedly there were only 9, 6Es ever made :naughty:

I know that isn't true, I have more serial numbers than that :drummer:
 

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corroded aluminum.......

1st its anodized......it doesn't fall off

you're going to want to save all the sharp edges or it will look like shit forget the Dremel

as Brian said count your settings.....

as Joe said "send it to the platers, have it stripped and re anodized"

amongst other things I restore high end single barrel trap guns mostly Ithacas.......there are no short cuts......its the right way or you end up with a POS

my 7E is identical to Annie Oakley's (except for stock length) and has 6 colors of gold on it

my 6E was engraved and inlaid by Rudolph Kornbrath......look him up......supposedly there were only 9, 6Es ever made :naughty:

I know that isn't true, I have more serial numbers than that :drummer:
Fully agree, that's the way to do it and keeping the finish quality.

btw, Wow! What nice engraving on those rifles. I now remember seeing a similar engraving on my grandpa's rifle! Can that be? Sadly, the rifle disappeared when he passed away, guess some relative ......
 
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