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Discussion Starter #1
Last Sunday when I was riding at around 70km my bike suddenly turned itself off. Luckily I was on a main straight and I could pull over safely. I found that the main ignition fuse was blown. Quickly replaced the fuse with the spare one in the start solenoid and it started again. I was overjoy but thought it might be good idea to head back home. Rode for about 500m and the fuse brew again. Got a service station nearly so I bought 3-4 30amp fuses. Put back in, rode for a short distance, and all brew.

I just purchased a new battery just over 12 months ago. The bike has been working fine and attended 3 trackdays in the last 3 months without any issues. Major service was done just over 4 weeks ago and it was fine then.

Now my bike is in the MV authorised dealer in Sydney and it just ran out of warranty. They are still trying to find the cause of the issue. It's been there for over 2 weeks now and still no news. The technical director advised that the bike is "half broken" and they tried many things such as swapping the alternator, different parts. The bike can run for a while but the fuse will eventually blow. They are confident once the fault is found it can be fixed quickly.

I am at a cross road at the moment because I am seriously considering leaving the Brand. I love MV and all its passion. However, I cannot deal with unreliability like this. I think they are the most beautiful bike. I was considering buying an F3 as I want to get into supersport. However, I am seriously concerned about having issues, and considering the money you pay there are much better deals out there.

I just hope this can be sorted soon
 

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If the problem is caused by a true defect in manufacture or material and it began while under warranty then the warranty should cover it. Just because warranty expired prior to repair does not negate the date of failure being within warranty.

Don't understand why a competent and knowledgeable technician can't diagnose a basic electrical fault.....although today's bikes have much more complex electrical systems than bikes in the past, and technicians were lousy at electrical diagnosis then too.

Hope they find the simple (it's always something simple, just not simple to find) problem and get you back on the road soon.
 

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For clarity...which fuse blew? You say "Main Ignition"...are you referring to the one on the start solenoid, or another fuse?

A 40 amp fuse draw is very large. Blowing a fuse of that size is usually the result of a direct short to ground, or the build up of IxIxR load due to corroded or poor connections.
 

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703 is spot on. If it is popping the main 40 amp it is shorting to ground somewhere. A good tech will find the problem, but it can take some time.

Swapping components, checking & cleaning the connections, testing the harness, close visual inspection of the wiring, etc all takes time.

I had a Honda CBR popping main fuses once. Turned out to be a chaffed wire shorting to a sub frame rail found by a close visual inspection. Best of Luck. Cheers


"Italian Motorcycles - turning riders into mechanics since... well Forever"
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes the main 30 amp fuse keep blowing. It is located inside the start solenoid. When it is blown, there is no power. Nothing comes up on dash.

If it was a wire shorting circuit somewhere, would it be covered under warranty??
 

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Yes the main 30 amp fuse keep blowing. It is located inside the start solenoid. When it is blown, there is no power. Nothing comes up on dash.

If it was a wire shorting circuit somewhere, would it be covered under warranty??

If it is caused by a defect in material or workmanship...YES.

If it caused by something someone has done during service or modifications after it left the factory...NO.

So if the factory routed a wire, untouched since factory assembly, in a manner that it has chaffed and shorted out...that would be warranty. Or if a component of the electrical system has failed internally creating a short....that would be warranty.
 
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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
A quick update. The MV dealer has finally contacted me and said that they couldn't locate the fault. Therefore they cannot gurantee that it has been fixed, because it may happen again. They said this is the 2nd best thing they can do.

They said that they suspect corrison of the connector may have contributed the fault (blowing the main fuse). They said they have swapped parts to test, and cleaned all connection points. Since then they were not able to replicate the fault.

They have been keeping the bike for more than 4 weeks. They said they are at the point where they need to hand the bike back to me because they couldn't locate the fault.

They also said it is not warrantable because I think they couldn't identify the fault, and there will be a charge. I haven't picked up the bike yet because I am unsure if I should pursue it further, or just pick it up and hoping it won't happen again.

I am quite disappointed with the outcome because I know full well that this may happen again. And, this fault could be fatal. If this happens when I am doing high speed cornering I am very likely to crash. Not to mention I am already worried that the fault might happen after I picked up the bike and ride on the motorway back home.

I've owned this bike brand new for 3 1/2 years. Bought it from this dealership. I follow the servicing routine without fail. Just had its major service 6 weeks before this happened. How could a well cared for bike, under 4 years old, can have such a catastrophic failure like this and it is not covered by manufacturing warranty? I am at a loss. I have lost complete faith in MV.

I like to hear more feedback from the members here. thanks for reading.
 

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If they have inspected the bike, cleaned up found corrosion on connections, and have not experienced your original concern since, then they have done all they can do. You can not fix a problem that can not be replicated.

No defect was found. Corrosion is environmental deterioration and is not a manufacturer defect.

Any brand of machine could have an odd failure at any time, it is not a predictable occurrence.

Motorcycles are inherently dangerous. A skilled rider should be able to compensate for sudden loss of power in most conditions, but there is never a guarantee you will return safely from any ride you take.

I would suggest you sell/trade your bike, as you have lost confidence and will never be comfortable. I suggest you get a HonKawSuzYam or just quit riding bikes all together.
 

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I’m with Ed here. I was just formulating my response mentally when I read his post. I agree completely.
You cannot engineer out all possible failures from a machine. Even Soace Shuttles fail.
 
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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the feedback. I agree this issue can happen to all brands of motorcycles, as I have searched online and found that many have experienced it. However majority of those issues are related to shorting circuit due to a defect of a part or component, etc.
I hope that the cause of the issue was due to corrosion, because if it was, then the problem is fixed. I hate to think the problem is still lying under the surface. Therefore all I can conclude is that I was unlucky that this happened. To be honest the bike was very reliable and I loved riding it.

If corrosion can potentially cause a bike to blow a fuse that can lead to sudden loss of power, then wouldn’t it be something that should be inspected and checked during routine servicing?
 

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That is not going to be routine servicing. It depends on use and weather conditions.

If it really worries you, can I suggest you get an auto electrician to go over the bike. A fresh set of specialist eyes might see something that a mechanic won’t pick up.
A lot of service people are trained simply to read fault codes and replace parts - they don’t actually repair things like in the past.
 

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I can assure you, having spent a lot of time getting to know them, that the technicians at MV Parramatta are EXTREMELY good at what they do, and don't just read fault codes and replace parts. I don't know which dealer in Sydney your bike was at, but if it was with them you can trust whatever they say.

You can't fix a fault you can't find.
 

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Blown fuses from corrosion -- hmmmm

Hi!

If a fuse blows, something has been drawing too much current .. too many Amps to be specific.. Corrosion on contact surfaces leads to increased resistance -- increased resistance leads to less current = fewer amps, but usually also to something not functioning correctly, since it can NOT draw enough current and voltage drops...

Fuses can blow from induced heating -- If the corrosion is in the Fuse holder, the corroded point can create a "hot spot" in the contact point- this heat transfers to the fuse link. A heated fuse link blows at a much lower number of Amps than the fuse rating.

I would run the bike with everything switched on, and measure the current through the main fuse. If it stays below 25 amps at all revs, all should be well ..
Thermal cameras (Flir) are perfect for detecting hot spots in wiring and contacts. Some Auto-electrics specialists have them.
 
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Um, unless the fuse holder is corroded, as you stated, causing lower current but more heat.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
A final update.

I have taken the bike back from the MV dealer (MV Parramatta). They have explained that they have done everything they could to try to fix it. However they cannot fix a problem if it does not exist. They have gone to the extend of stripping the bike, changing different components to try to replicate the fault, unwrapped harness insulation to check damaged wires, and removed terminals from connectors for inspection. At the beginning they could replicate the fault. After they cleaned the corrosion the fault no longer returned. They have also completed extensive stationary test and road test to try to replicate the fault but it hasn't returned.

I appreciate their thoroughness and their professional workmanship. This is I think as best an outcome as I could get without getting an auto electrician as suggested. On my way back the bike felt normal. thanks for all the input and feedback. Appreciate the support from this forum as well.
 

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It sounds like they were very thorough.

Now, as a responsible owner, you need to maintain the electrical system by periodic inspection.
 
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