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Yesterday, I installed the 35mm Lust lowering links on my 2019 TVL SCS. After a 16 day ride, I decided that I just had to get closer to the pavement. I can now plant my feet firmly on the ground. Far more confidence now.

There have been a number of reports of people installing lowering links. I would like to provide a bit more information on how this is done.
1. This procedure can be done on the center stand, no problem.
2. You have to remove the exhaust. There are three fastening points, it's a slip fit and relatively easy to do. No need to remove the rear wheel.
3. Remove the two bolts on the links. It helps to have someone lift the wheel so you can remove the old link bolts and install the new ones.
That's it.

The Lust installation sheet claims that you do not have to lower the forks as well. They say straight line tracking improves and it's a bit harder to steer into turns. However, to maintain factory neutral specs, Lust recommends lowering the front forks 15mm for a 35mm link. That's what I did. Once again I did this on the center stand.
1. Loosen the two bolts on the lower fork tree clamp and the one bolt on the upper clamp. Do this one at a time.
2. The tube will immediately slide. I marked both lower forks at exactly 15mm and reclamped at that point. I was able to do this without removing any of the fairing.

That's it. 90 minutes start to finish.

The stock kick stand stands the bike a little bit straighter. I always thought the bike leaned too far anyway. I am quite happy with the angle. The center stand, on the other hand, is now a real handful. It can be done but it ain't easy. I have studied the fit extensively. I have a plan on how to modify it so it's more manageable. It's going to require extensive cutting, grinding, and welding. Another day.

As far as handling? I can't tell the difference. I am 72 years old, 5'10", and 185 lbs. I usually load the bike to the limit for long, long road trips. I am not a pro road racer and I don't drag pegs but I do run the machine hard and fast. Feels fine. 🙂
 

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Bonjour ,
j'ai descendu ma TV avec un kit -25 mm et la bequille faisait trop droit ...
Mon mécanicien m'as mis une béquille latérale de Dragster et là ,
je retrouve ma moto "normale" ...
Donc n' n'hésitez pas.
Hier, j'ai installé les biellettes de descente Lust 35 mm sur mon TVL SCS 2019. Après une balade de 16 jours, j'ai décidé que je devais juste me rapprocher du trottoir. Je peux maintenant planter mes pieds fermement sur le sol. Beaucoup plus de confiance maintenant.

Il y a eu un certain nombre de rapports de personnes installant des liens descendants. Je voudrais fournir un peu plus d'informations sur la façon dont cela est fait.
1. Cette procédure peut être effectuée sur la béquille centrale, pas de problème.
2. Vous devez retirer l'échappement. Il y a trois points de fixation, c'est un ajustement coulissant et relativement facile à faire. Pas besoin de démonter la roue arrière.
3. Retirez les deux boulons des maillons. Il est utile d'avoir quelqu'un pour soulever la roue afin que vous puissiez retirer les anciens boulons de liaison et installer les nouveaux.
C'est ça.

La fiche d'installation Lust affirme que vous n'avez pas non plus besoin d'abaisser les fourches. Ils disent que le suivi en ligne droite s'améliore et qu'il est un peu plus difficile de tourner dans les virages. Cependant, pour maintenir les spécifications neutres en usine, Lust recommande d'abaisser les fourches avant de 15 mm pour un lien de 35 mm. C'est ce que j'ai fait. Encore une fois, je l'ai fait sur la béquille centrale.
1. Desserrez les deux boulons du collier inférieur de l'arbre de fourche et le boulon du collier supérieur. Faites-le un à la fois.
2. Le tube glissera immédiatement. J'ai marqué les deux fourches inférieures à exactement 15 mm et j'ai resserré à ce moment-là. J'ai pu le faire sans enlever le carénage.

C'est ça. 90 minutes du début à la fin.

La béquille d'origine tient le vélo un peu plus droit. J'ai toujours pensé que le vélo penchait trop loin de toute façon. Je suis assez content de l'angle. La béquille centrale, en revanche, est désormais une vraie poignée. C'est faisable mais ce n'est pas facile. J'ai beaucoup étudié l'ajustement. J'ai un plan sur la façon de le modifier pour que ce soit plus gérable. Cela nécessitera une coupe, un meulage et un soudage intensifs. Un autre jour.

En ce qui concerne la manipulation ? Je ne peux pas faire la différence. J'ai 72 ans, 5'10" et 185 livres. Je charge habituellement le vélo à la limite pour de longs trajets sur route. Je ne suis pas un coureur professionnel sur route et je ne traîne pas de piquets mais je fais fonctionner la machine dur et rapide. Se sent bien. 🙂
[/CITATION]
 

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Bonjour ,
j'ai descendu ma TV avec un kit -25 mm et la bequille faisait trop droit ...
Mon mécanicien m'as mis une béquille latérale de Dragster et là ,
je retrouve ma moto "normale" ...
Donc n' n'hésitez pas.
I did lower my TVL, but not enough to justify a shorter side stand.
 

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[QUOTE = "Metrix06, post: 2668994, member: 119404"]
Hello ,
I lowered my TV with a -25 mm kit and the stand was too straight ...
My mechanic put me on a Dragster side stand and there
I find my "normal" motorcycle ...
So don't hesitate.
[/ QUOTE]

Welcome to the family @Metrix06 !! Now please introduce yourself to us with a post in the "New Member" section.
S how us pics of your TVL and the French countryside ...... And where are you living in France?
 

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[QUOTE = "Metrix06, post: 2668994, member: 119404"]
Hello ,
I lowered my TV with a -25 mm kit and the stand was too straight ...
My mechanic put me on a Dragster side stand and there
I find my "normal" motorcycle ...
So don't hesitate.
[/ QUOTE]

I did at one time put on a side stand from a Brutale and it was fine. I found that I lowered it too much and the geometry was not the way I liked it, so I raised it up a tad and then reinstalled the original side stand.
 

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Lovered my TVL 2020 today.
30mm on rear, 20mm on front.
Maybe the front also should have 30mm?
Easy job, did not remove the exhaust.
Side stand works great, it do not lean over as much as before.
But I feel quite comfy with the angle.
The sender stand is now a pain, real heavy but not impossible.
It will be shorted 25-30mm during the winter.
 

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Yes, the front should also be 30mm. Otherwise the steering will be slower.
 

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Any idea about chain adjustment on lowered bikes? The angel will be different with the bike on the senter stand.
 

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I will say this about transmission chain tension setting: The Workshop manual for the TV has a misprint saying to put the bike on the Center Stand.
The bike should be on a Rear Stand with the weight of the bike on the swingarm.
There is no effect from a lowered bike if it is done this way.
 

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The TV manual I read said “center stand” whereas every other MV manual says “rear stand”.
That is why I mentioned it.
 

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I just adjusted my chain. I don't know what the actual difference is between the terminology with "rear stand" vs. "center stand" unless the rear stand is an independent stand. I think maybe the manual was written or edited by a person or persons in which English was not their first language.
When I have my bike on the side stand, you can't get an accurate measurement, because the center stand is in the way.

There is a little white triangle that marks the location of where you should measure (I assume) 90 degrees down to the chain with a side note the states "108 mm". So unless you remove the center stand, or use a flexible tape measure you can't the 2 points to line up. If you do use a flexible tape measure and bend it to some convoluted position then you really don't get an accurate reading either.

I do have a rear stand for single sided swing arms so I can raise the back wheel and should be able to move the center stand enough to take an accurate reading. I will take a reading with both and see what the difference is.
 

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The difference will be the weight of the bike on the rear wheel on the centerstand v., the rear stand....paddock stand/swingarm stand/ground.

You can do the chain measurement with a friend holding the bike vertical.
 

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I wonder if the TVL measurement is actually supposed to be on the center stand?
Its the only MV that has one.
Try this...set it on the center stand and adjust the chain per diagram/manual. Then put a ratchet tie down between the frame and swing arm and compress the suspension until the front and rear sprocket and swingarm pivot are all on the same plane. Chain should have a very minimal amount of slack but not be "bow string tight" at that point.
That is optimal chain adjustment point.
 

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@esq'z me @hansb - Ok, so now I am questioning my mind....I just reread the TV Shop Manual and this is what is says:

Motor vehicle Font Automotive design Automotive lighting Recipe

Organism Font Motor vehicle Auto part Art
 

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I understand it so that a rear stand is a paddock stand, according to the photos in the service manual.
More or less the same reading than on the side stand, weight on the rear wheel.
Have a paddock stand in order, so I will find any difference when it arrives.
 

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That picture does not show where the center stand legs are...It doesn't address the center stand at all. So oddly enough this picture doesn't speak a 1000 words...
Being the type of guy I am; I went out and put the bike up on a rear stand...which is somewhat of a PITA since the locking clip that holds the lug nut in place adds to my frustration. However the results are interesting. With the bike on the center stand , which is how I adjusted it, the chain was at 108 mm, which is sort of a +/- measurement do to the ruler I used, holding the ruler strait and constant while bent over on all 4's reading tiny little lines.
I then put the bike up on a rear stand and took a measurement. The results... (drum role please) 105 mm again this is a +/- measurement, when performed by me.
 

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My bike is lowered 30mm, and I have no idea if the angle change anything about the readings.
Right now I feel the best way is use a paddock stand so there is weight on the rear wheel.
 

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My bike is lowered 30mm, and I have no idea if the angle change anything about the readings.
Right now I feel the best way is use a paddock stand so there is weight on the rear wheel.
Sounds like a plan. I have also lowered my TVL...I don't actually know by how much, but very little.
 

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Yesterday, I installed the 35mm Lust lowering links on my 2019 TVL SCS. After a 16 day ride, I decided that I just had to get closer to the pavement. I can now plant my feet firmly on the ground. Far more confidence now.

There have been a number of reports of people installing lowering links. I would like to provide a bit more information on how this is done.
1. This procedure can be done on the center stand, no problem.
2. You have to remove the exhaust. There are three fastening points, it's a slip fit and relatively easy to do. No need to remove the rear wheel.
3. Remove the two bolts on the links. It helps to have someone lift the wheel so you can remove the old link bolts and install the new ones.
That's it.

The Lust installation sheet claims that you do not have to lower the forks as well. They say straight line tracking improves and it's a bit harder to steer into turns. However, to maintain factory neutral specs, Lust recommends lowering the front forks 15mm for a 35mm link. That's what I did. Once again I did this on the center stand.
1. Loosen the two bolts on the lower fork tree clamp and the one bolt on the upper clamp. Do this one at a time.
2. The tube will immediately slide. I marked both lower forks at exactly 15mm and reclamped at that point. I was able to do this without removing any of the fairing.

That's it. 90 minutes start to finish.

The stock kick stand stands the bike a little bit straighter. I always thought the bike leaned too far anyway. I am quite happy with the angle. The center stand, on the other hand, is now a real handful. It can be done but it ain't easy. I have studied the fit extensively. I have a plan on how to modify it so it's more manageable. It's going to require extensive cutting, grinding, and welding. Another day.

As far as handling? I can't tell the difference. I am 72 years old, 5'10", and 185 lbs. I usually load the bike to the limit for long, long road trips. I am not a pro road racer and I don't drag pegs but I do run the machine hard and fast. Feels fine. 🙂
I modified my centre stand by making adjustable feet that slide inside the original tubing. I have three settings , (secured with HT bolts and nyloc nuts), which equate to the original length and two for different length lowering links. I have never had a problem with scraping.
If your touring with full cases, the centre stand, I find is a must.
 
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