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Discussion Starter #1
First of all I went to the "all you need to know" section and it seems I may have to replace fuel lines or something like that. Will remove the canister too if I see one in there.

The last few times I have ridden I have noticed that at low rpm below 2000, the engine runs roughly and is hiccupping. Tonight I rode to work and as the issue was happening I noticed a soft flickering of the low fuel lamp. Something I did not notice during the day. I believe there may be air getting into the fuel lines at low RPM. When I got to work I opened the gas tank and tried to see if I saw bubbles rising as it idled. The vibrations from the engine made the surface of the gas ripple so I could not discern if there were bubbles.

So after reading all the info I will have to do the job myself. Hopefully I will be able to obtain all the necessary tools and parts and tackle this soon.

If anyone has had a similar problem let me know Thanks
 

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?

James;

You'll need some Clic-R pliers EBay ~$13-14 watch the shipping

While you're in there change the fuel filter too I use WIX #33012

:popcorn:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Noel, will buy those right away- along with the other items that I saw in the post. Spectacular !! Avatar.. Oh the Joy!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ok, started this post and wanted to update and ask for help.

The issue is that as the bike is not idling smoothly at temperature. I replaced the fuel filter and bought a new battery. I found the fuel level sensor loose and I pushed it back into the tube where it belongs. The fuel lines seemed ok. There was some debris in the tank, I believe from the first fuel line replacement.
So I put it all back together and it seemed ok, however after riding for a while as the tempreature is at about 205, The rough idling begins. It is not like its missing a cylinder but as a split second stall.

Strange how it happens when its hot and not cold.
 

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Change your spark plugs, and while you have the tank off go around all the electrical connections with dielectric grease.
If that doesn't fix things, I would then get the injectors cleaned.
All simple cheap stuff, before you go looking further.
 

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I had the same problem with my 1078 and like Jon says replace your spark plugs with iridium.NGK CR9EIX.Also check for any vacuum leaks.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Installed new iridium plugs about 2 months ago, check. Same ones you mention Mitch. Will go back as soon as possible and re-check the connections. The di-electric grease you mention, any commercial names?

When I was servicing the fuel filter I noticed that the connector on the fuel pump under the tank swiveled around. Is this normal?

This time when I go back in I'll remove the CO canister too.

Any other insights into this issue is much appreciated

Thanks mates
 

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James,

Suggest you check the air sensor left side under the cheek.

Mine was faulty.sending the signal to ECU that air pressure was low so ECU consequently sent a reduced fuel flow from the injectors.....bike ran very lean as a result causing heat and rough running most noticeable at lower revs , momentary cutting out, and boy was it getting hot under the seat. I believe this contributed to a wiring melt at the tail of my bike,

Also as stupid as it sounds, make sure your battery connections are good as a loose ground wire for instance will cause cutting out //

Check it
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Dielectric grease I found out is vaseline. Well lifted tank today and vacune lines were attached. It seems like it is one of those frustrating intermittent faults. Checked the routing of the wires from the fuel pump too and seemed ok. So then went out for a ride and all ok. Frustrating!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Next time I'll do the checks of the air sensor, guess I'll buy a multi-meter to do the checks per the chassis manual.

Thanks for the feedback I'll keep you posted!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I appreciate the feedback revhead, a question would one faulty plug cause the engine to not idle smoothly at low RPM's? Hmm now I have to check the plugs...
 

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I'm still chasing random rough idle on my bike. So bad at times when very slowly rolling on the throttle the bike struggles to accelerate.

Coil(s), injector(s), or map sensor. At times I can make it go away by a quick twist of the throttle, but not always.

Odd
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I'm still chasing random rough idle on my bike. So bad at times when very slowly rolling on the throttle the bike struggles to accelerate.

Coil(s), injector(s), or map sensor. At times I can make it go away by a quick twist of the throttle, but not always.

Odd
Read that you synchronized your throttle bodies, did that work?
 

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Where do you people get your information?

From Wikipedia:

Dielectric grease[edit]

Dielectric grease is electrically insulating and does not break down when high voltage is applied. It is often applied to electrical connectors, particularly those containing rubber gaskets, as a means of lubricating and sealing rubber portions of the connector without arcing.

A common use of dielectric grease is in high-voltage connections associated with gasoline engine spark plugs. The grease is applied to the rubber boot of the plug wire. This helps the rubber boot slide onto the ceramic insulator of the plug. The grease also acts to seal the rubber boot, while at the same time preventing the rubber from becoming stuck to the ceramic. Generally, spark plugs are located in areas of high temperature and the grease is formulated to withstand the temperature range expected. It can be applied to the actual contact as well, because the contact pressure is sufficient to penetrate the grease film. Doing so on such high pressure contact surfaces between different metals has the advantage of sealing the contact area against electrolytes that might cause rapid deterioration from galvanic corrosion.

Another common use of dielectric grease is on the rubber mating surfaces or gaskets of multi-pin electrical connectors used in automotive and marine engines. The grease again acts as a lubricant and a sealant on the nonconductive mating surfaces of the connector. It is not recommended to be applied to the actual electrical conductive contacts of the connector because it could interfere with the electrical signals passing through the connector in cases where the contact pressure is very low. Products designed as electronic connector lubricants, on the other hand, should be applied to such connector contacts and can dramatically extend their useful life. Polyphenyl Ether, rather than silicone grease, is the active ingredient in some such connector lubricants.

Silicone grease should not be applied to (or next to) any switch contact that might experience arcing, as silicone can convert to silicon-carbide under arcing conditions, and accumulation of the silicon-carbide can cause the contacts to prematurely fail. (British Telecom had this problem in the 1970s when silicone Symel® sleeving was used in telephone exchanges. Vapor from the sleeving migrated to relay contacts and the resultant silicon-carbide caused intermittent connection.)

Versus: Vaseline(Petroleum Jelly)

Petroleum jelly is a mixture of hydrocarbons, having a melting point usually within a few degrees of human body temperature, approximately 37 °C (99 °F).[5] It is flammable only when heated to liquid; then the fumes will light, not the liquid itself, so a wick material like leaves, bark, or small twigs is needed to ignite petroleum jelly. It is colorless, or of a pale yellow color (when not highly distilled), translucent, and devoid of taste and smell when pure. It does not oxidize on exposure to the air and is not readily acted on by chemical reagents. It is insoluble in water. It is soluble in dichloromethane, chloroform, benzene, diethyl ether, carbon disulfide and oil of turpentine.[1][6]

Depending on the specific application of petroleum jelly, it may be USP, B.P., or Ph. Eur. grade. This pertains to the processing and handling of the petroleum jelly so it is suitable for medicinal and personal care applications.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Ahh yes, I saw the video postef about the dielectric properties of vaseline, haha but they never mentioned its volatility at high temperatures!! Thank you Silent Service!! Would be useless if applied to the boot of the spark plugs or other electrical connectors on the bike. I could see it melting and running down onto the engine block and at least smoking! No worries mate as I have not applied anything yet.

BTW rode bike last night and this morning and it is still running fine.


Where do you people get your information?

From Wikipedia:

Dielectric grease[edit]

Dielectric grease is electrically insulating and does not break down when high voltage is applied. It is often applied to electrical connectors, particularly those containing rubber gaskets, as a means of lubricating and sealing rubber portions of the connector without arcing.

A common use of dielectric grease is in high-voltage connections associated with gasoline engine spark plugs. The grease is applied to the rubber boot of the plug wire. This helps the rubber boot slide onto the ceramic insulator of the plug. The grease also acts to seal the rubber boot, while at the same time preventing the rubber from becoming stuck to the ceramic. Generally, spark plugs are located in areas of high temperature and the grease is formulated to withstand the temperature range expected. It can be applied to the actual contact as well, because the contact pressure is sufficient to penetrate the grease film. Doing so on such high pressure contact surfaces between different metals has the advantage of sealing the contact area against electrolytes that might cause rapid deterioration from galvanic corrosion.

Another common use of dielectric grease is on the rubber mating surfaces or gaskets of multi-pin electrical connectors used in automotive and marine engines. The grease again acts as a lubricant and a sealant on the nonconductive mating surfaces of the connector. It is not recommended to be applied to the actual electrical conductive contacts of the connector because it could interfere with the electrical signals passing through the connector in cases where the contact pressure is very low. Products designed as electronic connector lubricants, on the other hand, should be applied to such connector contacts and can dramatically extend their useful life. Polyphenyl Ether, rather than silicone grease, is the active ingredient in some such connector lubricants.

Silicone grease should not be applied to (or next to) any switch contact that might experience arcing, as silicone can convert to silicon-carbide under arcing conditions, and accumulation of the silicon-carbide can cause the contacts to prematurely fail. (British Telecom had this problem in the 1970s when silicone Symel:registered: sleeving was used in telephone exchanges. Vapor from the sleeving migrated to relay contacts and the resultant silicon-carbide caused intermittent connection.)

Versus: Vaseline(Petroleum Jelly)

Petroleum jelly is a mixture of hydrocarbons, having a melting point usually within a few degrees of human body temperature, approximately 37 °C (99 °F).[5] It is flammable only when heated to liquid; then the fumes will light, not the liquid itself, so a wick material like leaves, bark, or small twigs is needed to ignite petroleum jelly. It is colorless, or of a pale yellow color (when not highly distilled), translucent, and devoid of taste and smell when pure. It does not oxidize on exposure to the air and is not readily acted on by chemical reagents. It is insoluble in water. It is soluble in dichloromethane, chloroform, benzene, diethyl ether, carbon disulfide and oil of turpentine.[1][6]

Depending on the specific application of petroleum jelly, it may be USP, B.P., or Ph. Eur. grade. This pertains to the processing and handling of the petroleum jelly so it is suitable for medicinal and personal care applications.
 

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James,
Not sure if same by my '02 750 F4 with 3000 mi. developed an intermittent low RPM stutter when rolling on throttle. If I went to idle immediately after the stutter it would occasionally idle rough. The problem would occur at lower range @ 2300-3300 range with a sort of bogging and stutter then smoothed right out & ran fine above that with good consistent power. It was somewhat intermittent but tended to occur as engine warmed up above 180F. I swapped out plugs but it would still occasionally have that stutter. Was going to take it in to local MV/Ducati shop and rode the weekend prior to see if I could get some better data on specific rpm range/gear selection where it would occur. After a couple of 3rd & 4th gear roll ons from low RPM where it seemed to be running fine it violently dropped the #3 cyl. The shop opened up engine and we found bent/broken valves, significant heat damage on top of #3 piston and scored cyl walls where parts went though on their way to the bottom end. MV N. America tech rep thinks it was injector failure and #3 had been running lean and hot for a while and thus resulted in failure. If my experience sounds remotely similar to what you have going on the recommendation to get injectors tested might be worth your time. Good luck!!
 
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