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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Note: While this is a customization post it only applies to the B3. Feel free to move to the customization section.

Since I bought my B3 I've wanted to remove the foot long plastic appendage..I mean fender. I am a huge fan of the Melotti fender eliminators for the F4 (my brother has one on his Benelli) but they didn't make one for the Brutale. So I figured I would make one!

I wanted to make one that was over the top and really done the right way . That meant, of course, that it was time to break out Solidworks...fire up the CNC...and get some billets of aluminum. My idea was to break away from the bent sheet metal and apply some of the design and manufacturing techniques that I use in the Aerospace Engineering world.

Step 1: Design

There's no easier way to bring something from your head to reality than through a CAD program. I went through a couple of ghastly designs before I came up with, what I think is, an aggressive yet elegant design.

The part is split into 3 pieces:

An adapter that mounts to the underside of the tail:




A connecting piece:

The connector is easily the most special piece of the assembly. It needs to act as both a support element as well as the most aesthetically striking piece. My goal was to end up with a connector that was subtle enough to not draw attention to itself but also complex and striking enough to match the bike.





The result is a connector that manages to be a subtle 2d shape from afar and a complex and elegant 3d shape from up close. From a side view, the connector appears to be a simple angular piece with a pocketed cavity to save weight. From an angled view, the drafts, tapers, and recessed trellis comes into view. The connector has a single overall taper from left to right. It also has a series of 3 morphing drafts on each side which give a twisting appearance.

The plate mount:

The plate mount is purely a functional piece. The design is still in its infancy and will probably change. It currently lacks a mount for blinkers and a plate light as I haven't decided what to use yet.



Step 2: Actually making things

Nothing overly exciting here but I thought it would be worthwhile to share how things are made.



Obviously everything starts as a nice ugly block of metal.



Things begin to take shape from the raw stock



After a quick flip that rectangular block is turned into a useful part. I decided to leave a heavy scalloped look to the surfaces as it adds a fair amount of texture and depth to the part.

I started the connector this morning and it is about halfway done. The previous picture is a finished part. This picture is fresh out of the machine and has had no deburring.





I went with a significantly smoother look to the surfaces of the connector compared to the bike mount.

I'll do my best to keep this updated and I should hopefully have it on the bike within a week or so.
 

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:mouthwate just got to love CNC, aluminium and a big dose of vision. Looks great keep the updates coming.....
 

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Very cool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I'm going to try and get some video sometime soon. Unfortunately everything is aluminum so this is what you see most often:


I might throw my gopro inside the machine (see the gopro mount in the upper left) and get some of the tapping on video. Anyone who hasn't seen a machine thread a tap into a hole at 1000 rpm, stop, and then reverse at 1000 rpm is missing out.
 

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I was raised by a metal worker. No CNC when he started but he couldn't stay behind. He's retired now and worked for Siemens in petro chemics for nearly 50 years. I actually have a tiny bit of experience myself since machineing was a minor in computer science. Mate of mine is also a gifted metal man creating one offs for all kinds of companies.

It's nice to create things with your hands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You'll probably find interest in this guy..his name is Rod Emory and I do a lot of work with him on classic Porsches. The work that he does with his bare hands is insane. I don't pretend to be a machinist by any means, I'm just in engineering and I know how to make my ideas come to life. There's something to be said when someone can look at a hand built Porsche and form something out of sheet metal in a matter of minutes. Check out this video http://www.petrolicious.com/outlaw-porsches-are-a-family-tradition

He works the metal, I just work with metal.
 

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Cool thread Neal, thanks for posting, not something I have ever seen before. Is it pretty gratifying to see your CAD drawings come to life?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The gratification comes from a real item coming from your mind. It's even more interesting when using subtractive manufacturing methods. The oddities of cad systems come from a lack of references to size. I've had parts that I've designed that end up being massively larger or smaller than they seem on the computer. I'll reference a piece of 1.5 inch steel I post machined. I knew full well the part was nearly 5 feet long but it never clicked that I couldn't move the damn thing without a suction array.
 

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Nice film...I hope he learns how to keep those cars on his side of the line in blind corners.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yea I wasn't a huge fan of that. I've never seen him do that before so my guess is it was just for the shoot. There were also like 7 people out there so it wouldn't surprise me if they were spotting. Still not cool though.
 

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Guys that can work metal well are magicians....especially the bag beater types. Having all of the tools he has is quite an advantage and he has been given the skills to use those tools well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Here's another interesting picture:


Some people are often confused as to how the part goes from computer to machine movement. With the help of CNC tools I tell the machine what to do in advance rather than spinning handles and physically moving the part around the cutting tool. The column on the left shows the individual operations. Each operation is defined based off of part geometry, tool geometry, tool speed, cutting speed, and the desired end goal. These are all the different movements that the tool makes in order to cut the connecting piece. The different colors signify different tools being used. Green and red signify high speed tool movements that are not cutting any material. Each movement is split into its own code in a language the machine can read. Movements can be either linear or circular. Variable radius corners or surfaces tend to be either made of a series of small straight lines or a few different radius moves. This part has about 70000 lines of code which is relatively low. I have a few programs that I've made that are well north of 7,000,000 lines.
 

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this is so cool i love seeing people with amazing skill like this im definately jealous cuz im not so crafty but thats awesome you have the skills to do this keep up the good work!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'm going to try and grab an picture or two of the fea I ran on the assembly. It gives a lovely view of what's going to happen when the part is subjected to stresses and is where you get your safety factor from. If I recall the tail tidy is something like a 4 or 5 times safety factor. Less important for a mostly aesthetic piece but much more important for a triple assembly or for rearsets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)


As promised...a quick picture of a simulation I did on the connecting piece. Like I said before, the part is not critical when it comes to strength (aside from being able to hold itself up). The connector is sitting at a 7 times safety factor with a 10 lb force pulling directly downwards. I would never expect to have 10 pounds sitting on the end of a tail tidy so the realistic safety factor would be higher. What is does show is a brief look into the analysis that goes into more critical parts. I'm turning my SV650 into a race bike and will make a new set of triples where this analysis will be critical.

Forces are in lb and the resultant stress is in psi because the silly US is still using the imperial system (apologies for non US people).

Note: The displacement that you see is extremely exaggerated. With a 10 lb load sitting on the end of the arm you would see >.005" of deflection. The exaggeration is merely to show stress risers.
 

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My custom tail tidy..

I simply used the under-seat fairing and the existing LP bracket to make my own tail tidy. Mounted the stock blinkers in the 'vents' on either side of the seat and I think it looks pretty damn good. Cost: $0.00 plus it saved a bunch of weight (after all the reflectors, charcoal canister, LP crap and whatever else, I pulled 8 lbs of crap off the bike). I plan on doing an integrated tail light and maybe LP frame with LEDs in the future.
 

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