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Discussion Starter #1
Ok so, I did a search on the forum and went out to buy some LED turn signals for the front. I read numerous thread about flash rate relays that needed to be fitted to make the LED blinkers flash correctly like the bulbs, and decided I could live with a fast blinker rate for now. I fitted the LED lights to the stock connectors by splicing the original turn signals and retain the stock connectors, pretty simple so far. Two wires for two wires...plug them back in and tested the turn signals...nothing no lights. replaced the stock turn signals and they work correctly...flipped the two wires on the LED turn signal to see if it might be that...nothing...what am I missing?

anyone can shed some light (pun inteded :))
 

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If the lights are Rizoma lights, you need the "black box". Without it they won't work.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
they are the motrax lights from cycle gear. nothing fancy, but I am thinking I might need some resistor to bring the current down maybe?
 

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Probably. Heat sink resistors are used in the setups I have done.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
do you remember what type and rate resistors you used? I must admit I am not very handy when it comes to electrical stuff.
 

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No, each is specific to the application.
Power (watts) = I (current) times E (voltage)
P (power) also = I (current) squared times R (resistance).
Knowing the wattage of your original light load (add the two original bulb wattages together) and the voltage of your system, you should be able to determine the design current flow.
For example, if your bulbs are 5 watts apiece, then: 5+5= I x 12v. So, I = 10/12, or 0.833 amps. Knowing that, then: 10w = (0.833) squared x resitance. Therefore R = 10/(0.833 x 0.833) = 14.4 ohms resistance.
If you buy two 7 or 8 watt heat load resistors and put one in each turn signal circuit, in series with the light, then the flash rate should be close as the load on the system is close.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thanks, that makes sense. I have to look at the manual to figure out the numbers then.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
actually, it's clearly labeled. 10W for the turn signal bulb. but I wonder would that make the LED not turn on at all? I thought it would only affect the flash rate, and not prevent it from turning on altogether.
 

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The system sees it as overcurrent probably. Like a dead short...so, it probably has an overcurrent protection and cuts current.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
ok, so after a few hours of troubleshooting, I finally figured out why it wasn't working...with all the stock turn signals removed and only one LED plugged in at a time, there wasn't enough load? on the system to flash and hence it wasn't flashing. When I plugged all the signals in and changed one signal at a time it works, didn't need resistors, flashes a little faster but I can live with that. Now all four signals are LED and it looks so much cleaner...
 

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Nice
 
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