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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im looking to upgrade some gear and i think i know the response im gonna get but throwing it out there. I want to get some version of knee sliders so i can practice up on turns/lean. This may be a big parking lot in spare time or future track days. So two piece sounds like a nice option, looks like the track day providers i would use are cool with that. Personally i have zero experience with them, functionality or anything. I have very little experience in a once piece, but i do know i would feel a bit strange fully kitted up in a technical college parking lot doin some low speed sloppy turns. The other option would be the least safe but still an option for at least some spare time training. Not sure if they exist anymore but icon clover leaf velcro knee sliders. Lets hear it!
 

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I'd suggest you don't give too much weight to what anybody else thinks about what your safety gear looks like in any public environment.
Do not focus on getting your knee down as the goal of your training.
Technical college carparks or any other carpark is definitely not the place to test the adhesion properties of tyres. You will not get sufficient heat in them to be operating at their best and you have no idea of the amount of crap contaminating the asphalt.

So, use a track. One piece leathers are the best option.
Dainese, Sidi or Alpinestars.
 

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Im looking to upgrade some gear and i think i know the response im gonna get but throwing it out there. I want to get some version of knee sliders so i can practice up on turns/lean. This may be a big parking lot in spare time or future track days. So two piece sounds like a nice option, looks like the track day providers i would use are cool with that. Personally i have zero experience with them, functionality or anything. I have very little experience in a once piece, but i do know i would feel a bit strange fully kitted up in a technical college parking lot doin some low speed sloppy turns. The other option would be the least safe but still an option for at least some spare time training. Not sure if they exist anymore but icon clover leaf velcro knee sliders. Lets hear it!
My .02...
I fully agree with castle on not worrying about what people think. By-far the primary goal is for you to feel the most most comfortable...both physically and mentally...and have protection.
I also agree that riding in a parking lot is not optimal for ultimate experience. However, I do think that an appropriately-sized parking lot can be a decent place to practice what is seems you are looking to actually learn...which is how to turn/lean. Check out motojitsu on youtube. He is a very technically-adept, well-trained rider, and he is a proponent of practicing leaning skill in appropriate parking lots. Now, Im not talking 100 mph stuff... But, you can get serious lean at 20-30 mph safely in a parking lot, just to get a feel for it. I suggest checking out his channel.
I highly recommend not focusing on getting your knee down at first. Just learn to lean the bike with good body positioning. And learn counter-steering technique, as that is incredibly useful and often overlooked. Getting you knee-down is primarily for gauging lean angle, and it has less impact on actually making the bike turn than a lot of people espouse. Upper-body positioning is much more critical to many aspects. My race instructor many years ago was somewhat old-school, and he professed that it was actually useless, especially on the street, but even on a track, if you could otherwise competently judge lean angle without it. The reality is that is that a lot of people on the street just think it makes them look cool while riding. At the level a pro-rider is at, chasing 10th's of a second, anything that helps higher corner speed is beneficial. But street or track days...its not necessary. Go watch some pro-riders who do youtube videos of them doing street rips. They arent touching-down knees on the street all over the place.
RE 1 vs 2-piece suits... It really depends. If you are going to commit to serious track riding, a one-piece might make sense. But the reality is that you can get nice two-piece, zip-together suits that are "legal" at most any track days, if not some amateur racing, and offer 99% of the protection (as long as its a good 2-piece with strong zipper connections and proper armor). But they suck on the street, especially if you do long rides in any warm weather. I have a nice 1-piece I got for the track, but I never wear it on the street. Its incredibly, and unnecessarily, restrictive and uncomfortable, and totally overkill for anything you should be doing on the street. The very vast majority of the "street rossis" are in it for the style. And that is totally fine, if thats your thing... But on the all-day rides that I do, it would be an incredibly unnecessarily uncomfortable experience. It seems it would be nice to unzip them and be able to cool-down on breaks without stripping down and having the top of the suit hanging off your back.
OK, this got really long, but Ive actually myself been contemplating getting a new 2-piece suit, for the above reasons. So I figured Id share my own considerations in that aspect in more detail.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok, yea let me clarify. The goal isnt to get a knee down, its to practice low speed (15-30 max) turning/body position/throttle control etc... Knee down is just a potential byproduct. Again only looking to improve the basics and technical stuff, nothing fast, just gaining confidence. And im not trying to put a knee down on the street.... the purpose of the protection im looking for is to protect me in the event of a spill or me hitting the ground with a knee and a potential track day. Yes ideally i could go to track and practice but thats not always practical. plenty of riding schools are in very large parking lots, im not worried about that. I will be making sure its a big enough area and clean.

Now as far as 2 or 1 piece. 2 piece is more versitile if im just just commuting and only want the jacket. the fit would be more loose opposed to a 1 piecer, the one i wore on track i felt like a stuffed sausage. But better that then baggy. Personally 2 piece is what im leaning towards, but the negatives are unknown to me. Noob, why do you say the 2 piece sucks on the street?
 

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I have had both. If you are doing a few track days a year, say like 3 or 4 ... Get a two piece. That what like you said more versatile. Of you do like 10 days a year... Suit. Also check for used suits on eBay or local forums. My first suit was $300 bucks and was in great condition.
 

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Ok, yea let me clarify. The goal isnt to get a knee down, its to practice low speed (15-30 max) turning/body position/throttle control etc... Knee down is just a potential byproduct. Again only looking to improve the basics and technical stuff, nothing fast, just gaining confidence. And im not trying to put a knee down on the street.... the purpose of the protection im looking for is to protect me in the event of a spill or me hitting the ground with a knee and a potential track day. Yes ideally i could go to track and practice but thats not always practical. plenty of riding schools are in very large parking lots, im not worried about that. I will be making sure its a big enough area and clean.

Now as far as 2 or 1 piece. 2 piece is more versitile if im just just commuting and only want the jacket. the fit would be more loose opposed to a 1 piecer, the one i wore on track i felt like a stuffed sausage. But better that then baggy. Personally 2 piece is what im leaning towards, but the negatives are unknown to me. Noob, why do you say the 2 piece sucks on the street?
Hello Peteroo,
It seems amongst my rambling I may have been unclear. Im absolutely saying that a 2-piece is better for the street. The one-piece is what would be uncomfortable/"sucky" and hard to manage trying to unzip and have the top half hanging down your back. With a two-piece, you can unzip the jacket from the pants, then just take off the jacket compeletly when you are parked/resting off the bike. Much better for cooling-off, flexibility, etc. Also, you can use that jacket with jeans or other pants, when you want to do so. Or use the leather pants with other jackets...
They also make strap-on knee pads that you can put over regular jeans, for when you are practicing, then take them off for normal riding. You may not even need a 2-piece with those...just get a nice jacket, gloves, helmet (obviously).
 

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The reason I prefer one piece leathers over two piece leathers is that the jacket (of a two piece) is, by design, measurably shorter than a dedicated jacket. You won't get full coverage for the waistline if you're wearing the two piece jacket with kevlar jeans or similar lower half. So the versatility, for me, is a bit of a myth.
As for cooling, I have a Dianese Bora suit which has the double zip system at the front. Mind you, New Zealand does not have the extreme temperatures that some of you chaps experience and ride in.
I should point out that I'm not trying to contradict some very well thought out observations by the folks above, these are just my thoughts. I'm not intending to create confusion on a very broad subject.
 

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Dainese Bora rapid cooling system deployed.
I would add a suitable emoji such as a penguin or cute polar bear but I don't like emojis.

Wheel Tire Automotive tire Motor vehicle Vehicle
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Awesome, il browse the old interwebs and see if anything pops up in the lightly used category. hell if its cheap/fits and relativly good condition might as well get a one piece. Also, good point on the 2 piece upper being a bit shorter. I will investigate that. Think a trip to the local dealer to size myself is in order/test fit a few.
 

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The reason I prefer one piece leathers over two piece leathers is that the jacket (of a two piece) is, by design, measurably shorter than a dedicated jacket. You won't get full coverage for the waistline if you're wearing the two piece jacket with kevlar jeans or similar lower half. So the versatility, for me, is a bit of a myth.
As for cooling, I have a Dianese Bora suit which has the double zip system at the front. Mind you, New Zealand does not have the extreme temperatures that some of you chaps experience and ride in.
I should point out that I'm not trying to contradict some very well thought out observations by the folks above, these are just my thoughts. I'm not intending to create confusion on a very broad subject.
Hey Castle, I was talking about the two-piece leather suits that are made to work together. Dianese, Alpinestars, etc, have two-piece versions of some of their their nice one-piece leather suits. I wasnt implying trying to zip the top half to anything else than the matching bottom-half. But for normal riding, the leather jacket top half could be used with other, non-matching pants for casual riding when they dont need to be attached for maximum protection. I, for example, have the top-half leather jacket that has a zipper and is meant to be used with the matching pants, which I never bought, since I have the one-piece. It works great as just a jacket with jeans...
Yes, the "real feel" temp here this week in GA is 105-110, taking into consideration the feel of humidity. I dont know where Peteroo is, but 1-piece would be miserable right about now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Wisconsin varies greatly. past few days were upper 90s but temp also drops 10-15 degrees when you get to close to lake michigan. Pretty standard summer low 80s right now though. I sweat my ass off wearing my leather jacket during summer traffic, textile slightly better but once moving not too bad.
 

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I have an Alpinestar 2 piece race suit.... I love it. When zipped together it may as well be a one-piece.
Back in the day (my day) many racers wore 2 piece suits. Most raced in both flat track and road races. There were no aero humps on the back. There was also no armor....even in the one-piece suits the dedicated road racers wore.

My Alpinstar suit has no aero hump... I don't need it. I'm not trying to win a race. It does have armor (it is a modern suit)
I have a 2 piece street Lookwell from MV that also zips together all the way around the waist. That is what I use for street rides. No hump.
I both cases, being able to take off the jacket makes life much more pleasant when in the pits or in the rest stop.

I also have 2 one-piece suits (one another Lookwell from MV).... I don't wear them very often.

Here's a recent shot of me in my 2 piece no hump Alpinestar track suit:
Wheel Tire Helmet Motorcycle Automotive tire


And my 2 piece zip together MV Lookwell street suit:
Plant Smile Vehicle Wheel Fuel tank
 
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Wisconsin varies greatly. past few days were upper 90s but temp also drops 10-15 degrees when you get to close to lake michigan. Pretty standard summer low 80s right now though. I sweat my ass off wearing my leather jacket during summer traffic, textile slightly better but once moving not too bad.
That still pretty hot... Its interesting how weather works in the eastern half of the states... The summer temps are pretty close all up and down the east side of the country, but the winter cold varies so widely. When I lived in California, there was a marked difference in summer temps between the north and south. I presume its Pacific current related to some extent.
I have a nice mesh kevlar/textile jacket with armor, as well. Thats what I use if its over 80 or so. Im skinny so I get cool at high speed if its much cooler than 75 or so, so I wear leather jacket more than not overall. I grew-up in the south, so I tend to prefer hot to cold anyway.
 

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If you only have one for the road and track get a 2 piece. If you can afford it 2 piece for the road and one piece and back protector for the track. Textile outwear is proven to be far inferior to leather in a crash so I would avoid that.

If you are just rolling through town the two piece jacket can be paired with some good Draggin jeans and this helps the cooling in a relatively low risk environment. Where I live we regularly see temps 30-42 deg C in summer.

When its hot:
  • If I'm going for a spirited road ride I will wear 2 piece leathers
  • cruisy ride, jacket and Draggins
  • track, one piece with back protector
It is all about risk assessment. Dress for the crash and likelihood of crash.

Going to the loo on a road trip when wearing a one piece is not fun....hence why 2 piece are more preferred.

There has been some suggestion an unexpected side effect of aero humps has helped to avoid excesive back ward head tilt in accidents that injures the cervical spine.

FCmoto have some very well priced suits in the Berik brand. I'm talking $600aud. I'm a life long Dainese customer. I wear Berik for the track they are a good brand, cheaper to replace and are a similar fit to Dainese.

PS:
The number one issue with people "trying to get their knee down" is they tense because they are "reaching for it".
The number 2 issue is they enter the corner too slow and add throttle and lean angle while reaching for it. These often end in a crash.

Solution: Pick a corner you like and incrementally enter it quicker each time as long as you are comfortable. Eventually you will lean further and you knee will touch down to make the corner. Doing it this way generally means there is more weight on your front tyre (grip) as you decelerate towards the apex and you are more comfortable (relaxed) and less likely to crash.
 

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I wear a back protector with my 2-piece track suit.
 

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I wear a two piece from Alpinestars (The Air Missile V3 Jacket & Pants)
Leather protection all around & back protection (buy the pad separately) I like having two pieces in case if I want to commute & meet with friends and wear jeans. If I'm just going out to be a little wild (or the track)...I zip them both together. Compatible with the Alpinestar airbag if you were ever planning on purchasing too.

If you're planning on going to a parking lot to practice -- who cares what people think! you're very well protected. Walking into a restaurant with a suit is probably where I'd draw the line & say it's time to get a two piece :p
 

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I wear a two piece from Alpinestars (The Air Missile V3 Jacket & Pants)
Leather protection in the chest if I want to commute & meet with friends and wear jeans. If I'm just going out to be a little wild (or the track)...I zip them both together. Compatible with the Alpinestar airbag if you were ever planning on purchasing too.
I've also got some mesh textile gear from Dainese but I prefer my Alpinestar stuff for more protection. (nothing against either brand. My Alpinestar gear is leather and my Dainese gear is a different material)

Both brands provide top tier protection.
 

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Buy what you can afford. if its two piece be sure the joining zipper is metal. Hard armor better than cheap soft. Back protector a must. Air bag a great option to save vidials. Back hump is not essential. The fit must be somewhat tight not to move when your depending on it. Perforated a good option to have. You can alway put a wind breaker on under it in colder temp. The leather must be from a cow or better. Like kangaroo or sting ray. No sheep or goat crap. Stretch panels will help comfort, fit and temperature. Test the front zipper so you can pee with the suit on but not on you.
Most of all may you never need it but have it if you do.
 
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