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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Picked up a 2007 f4 a few days ago, fuel pump and hoses are falling apart so that's the first job, can anyone suggest other things that could be worth looking at?
 

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Old Wing Nut
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Rear hub
 

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Hiya Nico,

I have been going through a similar process on my bike that was collecting dust for a number of years before i got it. My list compiled of reading other posts and advice from the forum (2004 750 but thinking most will apply to your bike as well):

-Filters (Oil, Air - Mine was really bad so happy i looked)
-Replace your Oil
-Coolant, mine looked fine in the reservoir but was brown when drained (I ran a flush through mine and found re-filling was easier if i pulled off the hose on the top right of the top intercooler when i refilled so it didnt airlock, you'll get some fluid on your hands when you re-attached it but found it to be the easiet way - oh and get some c clip pliers for the hose clamps)
  • Valve clearences (i'm mid way through doing this and needed to change around 10 of the 16 valve shims)
  • When you do the air filter you might want to look at the wellnuts that are in the airbox used to attach the small side covers. There are two specifically that are above the throttle bodies that cause concern about falling into the intake and the reccomendation is to replace with rivnuts or an alternate - i'm going to tape up the hole and run velcro to attach the small covers as i dont have a rivnut set - either way check out the posts going around the forum
  • My rear brake fluid reservoir was bone dry -its a bit hard to see so not easy to check
  • Rear hub as mentoned above
  • Fuel tank connectors i've seen spoken about. The idea being to upgrade from plastic to metal. I havent sorted myself on this one yet but seems like a good thing to do

I'm sure there will be a few more things people might add but these were my main ones. On the surface my bike presented well but i'm happy I stripped it down :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hiya Nico,

I have been going through a similar process on my bike that was collecting dust for a number of years before i got it. My list compiled of reading other posts and advice from the forum (2004 750 but thinking most will apply to your bike as well):

-Filters (Oil, Air - Mine was really bad so happy i looked)
-Replace your Oil
-Coolant, mine looked fine in the reservoir but was brown when drained (I ran a flush through mine and found re-filling was easier if i pulled off the hose on the top right of the top intercooler when i refilled so it didnt airlock, you'll get some fluid on your hands when you re-attached it but found it to be the easiet way - oh and get some c clip pliers for the hose clamps)
  • Valve clearences (i'm mid way through doing this and needed to change around 10 of the 16 valve shims)
  • When you do the air filter you might want to look at the wellnuts that are in the airbox used to attach the small side covers. There are two specifically that are above the throttle bodies that cause concern about falling into the intake and the reccomendation is to replace with rivnuts or an alternate - i'm going to tape up the hole and run velcro to attach the small covers as i dont have a rivnut set - either way check out the posts going around the forum
  • My rear brake fluid reservoir was bone dry -its a bit hard to see so not easy to check
  • Rear hub as mentoned above
  • Fuel tank connectors i've seen spoken about. The idea being to upgrade from plastic to metal. I havent sorted myself on this one yet but seems like a good thing to do

I'm sure there will be a few more things people might add but these were my main ones. On the surface my bike presented well but i'm happy I stripped it down :)
Thanks for the reply, the only thing in that list I would be scared to do myself is the valve clearances, might I get away without doing these as the mileage is low? 1200 miles I think.

I need to work out the best place in the UK for parts. All of the things mentioned sound relatively affordable other than the rear hub maybe, best I get searching on the forum!
 

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Overview to keep in mind
  • Time degrades grease and oil.
  • Oxidation degrades metal surfaces specifically electrical connections.
  • Rubber hardens/shrinks when not used.

under each of the above areas there are tasks to preform and parts to address. I mention these because it’ll help with organization and approach.

Manuals

Workshop manual, parts listings, engine guide all are vital. I highly recommend printing and binding pdf versions. Spiral bound works best. Print out torque setting images of left and right side of bike. Keep them handy. 3 torque wrench sizes are needed. Printout the electrical schematics

Organization

get small plastic bags for parts. Use a Sharpie to mark the bags. Be smart about this! Small containers to help organize overlapping sections.

Ease of work

Bursig stand will be your best friend. Clean shop area will help. Proper fluids, grease, threadlocker grades and other expendables. Research the stickies on this forum. Use your search wisely. Use a notebook for specs/tips found along the way. Bookmark threads.

Working on MVs

it’s a treat to work on MVs. You’ll see. Use the manuals. Use proper tools, processes, and expendables. Learn along the way.
 
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Old Wing Nut
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Thanks for the reply, the only thing in that list I would be scared to do myself is the valve clearances, might I get away without doing these as the mileage is low? 1200 miles I think.
I believe your valves will be well within specification at only 1200 miles. Forgo that bit of work until you have had a chance to ride the bike a bit..
It is not a difficult job, but can present problems when/if cam cap bolts refuse to loosen.
You will find working on your MV is a pleasant past time...just read the manuals and use good tools.
 
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Reactions: Nicof4312r

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Overview to keep in mind
  • Time degrades grease and oil.
  • Oxidation degrades metal surfaces specifically electrical connections.
  • Rubber hardens/shrinks when not used.

under each of the above areas there are tasks to preform and parts to address. I mention these because it’ll help with organization and approach.

Manuals

Workshop manual, parts listings, engine guide all are vital. I highly recommend printing and binding pdf versions. Spiral bound works best. Print out torque setting images of left and right side of bike. Keep them handy. 3 torque wrench sizes are needed. Printout the electrical schematics

Organization

get small plastic bags for parts. Use a Sharpie to mark the bags. Be smart about this! Small containers to help organize overlapping sections.

Ease of work

Bursig stand will be your best friend. Clean shop area will help. Proper fluids, grease, threadlocker grades and other expendables. Research the stickies on this forum. Use your search wisely. Use a notebook for specs/tips found along the way. Bookmark threads.

Working on MVs

it’s a treat to work on MVs. You’ll see. Use the manuals. Use proper tools, processes, and expendables. Learn along the way.
I had my eye on the ABBA Skylift, similar to the bursig stand I think. I'll download workshop manuals and print, I like that idea. Parts seem to be the biggest issue in the UK. There must be cheaper options than buying direct from MV but I'm sure there is plenty of alternatives hidden in forum threads.
 

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The ABBA is a fine lift in all sorts of ways. The Bursig is a day to day stand after every ride. It’s that easy and effective.
 
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