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So I never knew that we had a "P" on the ignition selector. I was in a hurry to leave the other day and I quickly cliked the key all the way to the left and pulled it out and walked away. When I got back, the 2 small lights in the headlight were on. "Weird", I thought and noticed the ignition had a parking feature. Bike wouldn't start, so I bumped it and went for a ride.

Alls well now, but I thought this might save someone else who wasn't paying enough attention to notice the P
 

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I thought it stood for Pissin' Pathetic Light :laughing:
 

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cryptyk said:
So I never knew that we had a "P" on the ignition selector. I was in a hurry to leave the other day and I quickly cliked the key all the way to the left and pulled it out and walked away. When I got back, the 2 small lights in the headlight were on. "Weird", I thought and noticed the ignition had a parking feature. Bike wouldn't start, so I bumped it and went for a ride.

Alls well now, but I thought this might save someone else who wasn't paying enough attention to notice the P
:laughing: all italian bikes or I would think european bikes have that.. its a PAIN in the arse, I always have to make sure I dont click over too far when I stop and get off the bike..
 

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The Dude
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cryptyk said:
so I bumped it and went for a ride.
dumb question here.... never had a dead battery on a bike before (knock on wood).... what does it mean to bump it? I heard you shouldn't jump start them like a car. does this mean something else?
 

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TokyoLunch said:
dumb question here.... never had a dead battery on a bike before (knock on wood).... what does it mean to bump it? I heard you shouldn't jump start them like a car. does this mean something else?
Too tired to explain so I found this off another site. (Long day at the office)


Bump start 101
By Arden Kysely

The modern motorcycle is a paragon of reliability compared to its vintage counterparts, or even those bikes built 20 years ago, but every motorcycle's trustworthiness is still subject to the whims of electrons. Or more specifically, their batteries are.

Batteries are better than ever, too, but that hasn't changed the First Law of Motorcycling Chemistry, which states that "Batteries do not last forever." A corollary to this law, filed under 'M' for Murphy, says, "Your battery will not die in your garage. It will pick a place of some distance or difficulty to expire." Other laws address charging circuits and starter solenoids in similarly dour terms.

The day comes for most every motorcyclist when thumbing the starter button elicits a click instead of a whir; silence instead of a motor roaring to life. The only noise after the dead silence begat by a dead battery is the muffled curses escaping from beneath a helmet. It's tough luck when your bike won't start, and there are only two choices once the swearing stops: walk or bump.

Bump starting is the disappearing art of starting a motorcycle by pushing it. Before electric starters found their way onto nearly every new bike, bump starting was a common practice among motorcyclists. Tired of kicking? Bump it! Not always easy, not always safe -- but often effective -- the bump start still has a place in a motorcyclist's arsenal of skills. Knowing how to do it correctly can get you back in the saddle instead of wasting shoe leather trudging to the nearest phone.

The goal is to push the bike to get it moving (a slight hill is welcome here), then simultaneously jump onto the seat (the bump) as you let out the clutch. The combination of the forward movement, the traction of the bump phase, and putting the bike in gear will turn over the engine, relieving the beleaguered battery from that duty. With a little luck and a little spark, you're on your way.

There are two basic methods for bump starting -- solo, and not so solo (sorry Star Wars fans, there's no Han Solo method). The solo method is the most difficult because the practitioner (she who is stuck) has to push the bike as well as operate the controls. The difficulty is greater on heavy motorcycles because they're harder to push. It's easier to turn over the engine on a small displacement bike or a multi-cylinder bike because there is less compression to resist ones' efforts.

Technique is everything. First, lighten the bike as much as possible. Remove saddlebags, even if empty. You'll be leaping onto this beast like Dale Evans onto Buttermilk, so give yourself every chance for a safe landing. Next, move the bike to where there are 20-30 yards of clear running and riding room, preferably downhill or level. Then make sure there's nothing slippery in the path -- your tires and feet will need all the grip they can get. Put the bike in second gear (or third on a low-geared, big single like my KLR 650), turn the switch to On, and set the choke and throttle just like you would if your starter was working. Easy so far, eh?

The next part is both tricky and dangerous, so acknowledge the risks and be especially careful. If you are inexperienced at bumping, you may wish to call AAA at this stage. But if you absolutely must get going, here's how to do it. From the left side of the machine, grab both handlebars and pull in the clutch. Now push the motorcycle from alongside until you're moving at a good trot. With the grace of Dorothy Hamill jumping into a flying camel spin, loft your rear over the seat, throwing your right leg completely over the bike. Then drop onto the seat with all your weight (ignore the footpegs). As you slam down onto the seat, release the clutch. If the stars are aligned properly and your ruling planet gives a nod, the motor will turn over, spark will ignite mixture, and the bike will be running. If not, try again. Needless to say, this can be a tiresome drill if the bike is flooded. Assuming the moon is in your sign and the motor catches, pull in the clutch and nurse the engine to a healthy idle. Now re-pack and be on your way.
 

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The Dude
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Thanks Amer.... interesting read. no real hills by my place, and not sure i want to practice for the first time on my MV....but good to know!

:conveyer:
-colin
 

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TokyoLunch said:
Thanks Amer.... interesting read. no real hills by my place, and not sure i want to practice for the first time on my MV....but good to know!

:conveyer:
-colin
You are welcome Colin.

I understand the process but have been fortunate not to try it :)
 

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MV Cellist
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Push starting your bike!

Colin, here is a simpler version of "push starting a bike", IMHO...

Push start a bike without a slope is not that difficult, its about all timing and coordination, I do it all the time with my Derbi racebike at the track since its battery was removed, it works on my street R6 too, I have done it many times*(see below). They are doing it with GP bikes too except it's done with what is essentially a "mini high speed treadmill"...

1. With your dead bike in 3rd gear and clutch pulled in, (key to ON position like how you would start a bike normally)push your bike like you normally would, on the left side of the bike with right hand fingers also on the brake lever...

2. Then gradually build up the speed, to about the speed of a fast walk or slow jog...

3. With the throttle open partially release the clutch quickly and the engine should jump starts.

4. What you will need to expect at this point: as the clutch lever is released, open the throttle at the same time(good amount like 50%-70%), then the bike will suddenly slow down due to engine braking, then you should immediately hear the engine turning over and jump starts, be prepare to pull in the clutch quickly to cut the power to the rear wheel so the bike don't run away from you... :eek:

5. At this time you can use the brake to stop the bike completely, swing your leg over the bike, then (1) put it into neutral, let go of your hand, take a deep breath, pat yourself on the back for a job well done:guitarist :drummer: :guitarist , or (2) put it into 1st and ride away like nothing happened :later: :later:





Here are a few more suggestions:

Make sure you rehearse the coordination of the clutch/throttle timing a few times before making your 1st attempt, THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IS TO BE PREPARED TO ENGAGE THE CLUTCH OR/AND BRAKE LEVER TO PREVENT THE BIKE FROM RUNNING AWAY FROM YOU.

You will need a bit of space to get the bike up to speed, if you have the space, then it's possible to just gradually build up the speed by walking with it faster and faster, no need to tire yourself out by trying to sprint with the bike, but if you are doing it in a confining space like an underground parking structure, or have no choice but to push the bike up an incline, you may need to be more expolsive with your effort to get the bike up to the speed.

If you have a down hill slope to woork with, it's much easier, just sit on the bike with it in 3rd gear, clutch pulled in, coast down the slope and repeat step 2-5... (*) I live on the top of a hill, to go anywhere I need to go down the hill first, so whenever I have to leave in the early morning or later at night, being a nice guy to my neghibors I would coast down the hill quietly, then start the bike with the procedure above when I am near the bigger streets on the bottom of the hill. in fact this is a good way to learn the timing of clutch for push starting, next time you are in the hills, you can try it with your healthy bike.

3rd gear is easiest on both my Derbi and R6, you may want to experiment with different gears on your own bike.

Do release the clutch lever quickly but don't let it fly away from your grasp for the obvious reason I mentioned above in bold print.

Just to be safe, one should ride around for 20 minutes or so to recharge the battery fully before shutting down the bike... depending on the condition of the battery, of course.

please practice it carefully and at your own risk. :)
 

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Its a 2001 GPR 50. I still have it, she's out in the garage right now.

I have yet to take it to the track, need to find some slicks for it.
 

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Bump starting an old British 500cc single was always fun. :laughing:
 

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odonata said:
Did you have issues with dead batteries on the Derbi?
Yes. The battery dies all the time. Its annoying :cussing:
But its not that hard to get it going again :drummer:
 
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