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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So this months issue of Practical sportsbikes in the UK has a three way test between an F4 750 Ducati 996 and a Benelli tornado tre.

In the write up it says that the F4 engine is not Ferrari derived but is a design influenced by a pre-SRAD watercooled engine! they actually say it sounds like an old slabbie or slingshot motor!

Quote from text in issue:

"It could be a gsx-r from the spec .And in fact,it's loosely inspired by one:contrary to popular misconception.the motor is not Ferrari developed . instead the engineers studied the pre SRAD watercooled GSX-r motor and took a lot of inspiration from that motor.Indeed ,when you flick the fast idle lever it grumbles and rustles from cold just like an old Slabbie or Slingshot."

Now I am not sure about this as the Slabbies/Slingshots were all oil air cooled to me me but has anyone got an opinion ?

Has anyone heard of this or is it more Myth as everything I have read is it has influences of Ferrari ie Radial valves but Suzuki ?
 

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Those writers have no clue......they are idiots. Where did they get that idea?
 

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Time to read some actual MV Agusta history and development books.
 

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Notwithstanding the romantic version of events and the desire to retain exclusivity, I would be very surprised indeed if MV did not study the GSXR 750 engine. After all, it was the engine to beat at the time and race proven.

And the specs suggest that the 99 models shared broadly the same bore, stroke and power outputs.

However, how much the Suzuki specs actually influenced MV is another story.
 

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I rate it appalling journalism when I writer quotes a fact: 'And in fact,it's loosely inspired by one:contrary to popular misconception.the motor is not Ferrari developed . . . ' but neglects to annex any supporting document or authority of how such a 'fact' was uncovered.

This, to me, is clear evidence of how a story will change when passed and regurgitated down the line.
 

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And all this time I thought the MV used a Honda engine.... :confused: :blah: :eek: :later:
 
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Discussion Starter #7
in my experience of the motor trade mainly cars the Italians have had no issue developing engines and some vehicles have been very successful I for one have a few MV books and they all say the same that the Ferrari influence is there essentially they to half a V6 and studdied it found the block wanting but the head design good and re-engineered accordingly .

I am happy to perpetuate the Ferrari myth even though the bike is full of Japanese parts on my 1st gen. Nissin brakes Nippondenso alternator etc.
 

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I do not know this publication, but every German magazine or book that portrayed MVA stated basically the same story:

- The bike was initially intended to be marketed as a Cagiva bike in the early 1990s when development began. At that time the Castiglioni Family did not even have the brand rights of MV Agusta.
- Castiglioni started development with support of Ferrari with the idea, potentially marketing it as a Cagiva/Ferrari superbike.
- Ferrari contributed engine concepts, one of These being a derivate of their 1990 F1 engine
- The engine concepts were quickly considered to be not suitable for a superbike, so Castiglioni brought in a Ducati engineer, Andrea Goggi who then added major revisions which led to changing from 5 to 4 valves, re-organizing intake/exhaust layout, etc.
- As they had already realized the "cut F1 engine" layout did not prove to be the ideal solution, they started looking left and right
- The Suzuki GSX-R750 engine was considered the benchmark, so they took some inspiration from that layout as well. But Goggi packaged a lot of things differently.
- It resulted in a final engine layout that took inspirations from both the Ferrari F1 engine and the Gixxer, but only Ferrari was at an early stage actively involved in the conceptual phase, even though the end product only has the radial valves as family tie to the Maranello engine. The Suzuki influence can be considered normal competitive intelligence, which all companies do.

An English article about that can be found here:

https://www.roadracingworld.com/news/tbt-mv-agusta-f4-750-press-intro-1999/
 
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