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Discussion Starter #1
All,

I just got an email from Brian Kinnear at Italian Superbikes here in Houston, TX USA. They shut down today, closed doors. I bought a new Guzzi from them 2 years ago and new Brutale RR Dragster in August. Now what? Anyone have any idea where I can get maintenance on these bikes, or warranty work? It sucks. Best I know, the nearest dealer is Austin, TX.
I have a mind to just sell both bikes and buy a japanese bike from one of the Houston dealers.

Crap. I am just gutted.

Advice?
 

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Dude. It's just a dealer. My closest MV dealer is 175 miles. My closest Norton dealer is 400 miles. It'll be fine. Take a breath. Move on.
 

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Nobody is buying motorcycles in general, much less the Italian stuff. Bimota closed in 2017 and Modus - a US bike - closed in Sep 18 after only 3 yrs. Don't know how anybody that sells bikes is still in business over the last two yrs. My dealer is getting rid of Suzuki and, when I visit his shop, nobody is in there. Harley has been down 5% for each of the last five yrs in gross sales and the latest Q was down 13%. Triumph is about the only one who is at least holding its own. I will be surprised if Moto Guzzi and or MV is around in 3-5 yrs and I have a $25k F4 Ago.

Your options, of course, are limited. You won't get much for the MV stuff due to the limited dealer network, the cost, the parts issues, the risk and the overall crappy market. You can learn to work on the bikes yourself which is what I do but of course there are certain things you simply cannot do. I try to find independents that I trust - either individuals or private dealers but this can be scarce and risky. Nevertheless, the basic maintenance on these things is pretty straightforward - tires, batts, oil etc and these parts are generic. So, if you like your bike, I would ride it and buy parts that you know you will need in the future. I don't have much advice on the warranty work. We bought these expensive and off brand bikes and now we have to live with the consequences of having to send it to Zimbabwe for serious service or warranty.
 

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To have MV and Guzzi leave a market the size of Houston is not a good sign but if the demand is really there another one will pop right up or will be picked up by one of the existing power sport dealers. Even a solid market such as LA with year round riding weather isn鈥檛 immune to dealer closures - Ducati Westlake just closed their doors.

Take time and look for a good indie service. Also, you may find techs who know MV working for Ducati, etc. However, in the end I tend to agree with Rob. Buying anything exotic or limited production, off mainstream, always carries risk that that brand may disappear from the market altogether. How I know? Alfa Romeo (before they returned to the US market), Moto Morini, Cagiva, Bimota (sold my SB8R, still have the YB10), etc. Anyway, if you love it you will find a way to maintain it.
 

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We have had dealers fall over in UK also, in particular a very good one near Silverstone Raceway.

As others have said, the 'passion' must override the simplicity of having a close dealer. There can be great techs hidden among other private workshops. I did some exploring and found a good one. With a little leg work I'm sure you'll come out of this ahead.

There's no secret on here that I love my Hondas, but to suggest foregoing both an MV and Guzzi IN FAVOUR of a Japanese bike is, to me, a backward move, both from a personal and financial perspective.:wink2:
 

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The Harley Deal put 100 million dollars in MVs pocket not counting Harley putting 100 million in plant upgrades ,retooling , model designs and MV grew tremendously for 5-6 years afterwards so they should be able to weather the storm for a good while . Also the restructure went well and MV was awarded excellent tax breaks . Italian Government is known for helping auto/motorcycle industry. Great political PR the Italian people LOVE there cars and motorcycles.
 

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The Harley Deal put 100 million dollars in MVs pocket not counting Harley putting 100 million in plant upgrades ,retooling , model designs and MV grew tremendously for 5-6 years afterwards so they should be able to weather the storm for a good while . Also the restructure went well and MV was awarded excellent tax breaks . Italian Government is known for helping auto/motorcycle industry. Great political PR the Italian people LOVE there cars and motorcycles.
This is a good case as to why MV may be around for longer than the others and I agree that Italy has always favored the automotive end of their economy. OTOH, every IT automaker - cars or bikes - has undergone some sort of reorg, acquisition, bankruptcy, sale, investor recompostion or outright bye bye. Every last one of them. Name one who is still in business on their own. I can't.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
All,

Thanks for some helpful and encouraging comments. Brian the owner did leave an email and phone contact, and he responded to my questions. He does still have diagnosis equipment. He said he hopes to reopen MV franchise in Houston, in the future. Fact is, the motorcycle market is very, very poor. Not enough old rich guys that love Italian bikes I guess. For now I will not panic, but I truly valued the shop as friends. Second time in six years MV and Guzzi have gone poof in Houston, TX: 4th largest city in USA.
We will see what happens.
 

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Our MV dealer in Adelaide is now a part of a Yamaha outlet also selling Royal Enfield and some scooters.
They have a few MV's of really top grade as their new selection and seem to keep the second hand ones at the Yamaha dealer (which is only about a mile up the road).

Although these folks have a smaller setup than the previous dealer (who is the largest motorcycle outlet in SA, carrying a myriad of brands including Harley, Triumph, Suzuki, Honda, Vespa..blah blah) they seem more interested in the brand and show more of the passion we all share, rather than the corporate "don't give a damn" attitude the previous dealer had.

Strangely size doesn't ALWAYS matter!

If you look around and chat to the mechanics / service managers of the other Italian bike dealers, you will be sure to find someone either with, or with links to a competent MV tech.

As for sell up and buy Jap..?
Well if that's what you really want to do...me, I have two Itai's, a HD and an old Bonneville and I find it very enjoyable to (slowly but surely) maintain them to the best of my ability as I have done for over 40 years.
 

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All,

I just got an email from Brian Kinnear at Italian Superbikes here in Houston, TX USA. They shut down today, closed doors. I bought a new Guzzi from them 2 years ago and new Brutale RR Dragster in August. Now what? Anyone have any idea where I can get maintenance on these bikes, or warranty work? It sucks. Best I know, the nearest dealer is Austin, TX.
I have a mind to just sell both bikes and buy a japanese bike from one of the Houston dealers.

Crap. I am just gutted.

Advice?
For maintenance on the Guzzi you could contact MPH Cycles on I10. I'm not sure if Moto Austin still services MV Agusta..I remember talking to them awhile back and they said they were going to stop selling them.
 

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I don't enjoy riding any bike as much as my MV. There are many great bikes out there that serve different purposes so maybe another bike is better for you. Ride the bike you are considering and decide. My dealers are all 6 hours away. I do all my own work. And if there is something I can't do I find someone who can.

I recently had a valve failure. I had my bike in as many pieces as you can imagine. Had a great source to do the head and cylinders by mail. Its back together and doing what it does better than any other bike I've ridden!!

Its funny that Triumph is doing so well. I bought a street triple R and later that month I got a letter saying they are stopping the Triumph support. In hindsight they really should have stuck it out.

I think if the bikes had more apps then everyone would buy one.... and be distracted and get into an accident!
 

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Sad

It is truly a sad state of affairs. We have dealers here in PA closing up shop all the time. Martin Motorsports got bought out. I tried to make an appointment for my MV and they didn't want to work on it! They were a dealer! The closest shop is in New Jersey which is a crappy turnpike drive. We have to get young people involved but sadly it seems a lost cause,. I have no idea how to do it, but it has to start with the families getting the kids involved.I am 57 and can't imagine not being on or having a motorcycle, my passion has been with me since 15 and hasn't waned.American kids would rather ride a motorcycle on a screen than the real thing.
 

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It is truly a sad state of affairs. We have dealers here in PA closing up shop all the time. Martin Motorsports got bought out. I tried to make an appointment for my MV and they didn't want to work on it! They were a dealer! The closest shop is in New Jersey which is a crappy turnpike drive. We have to get young people involved but sadly it seems a lost cause,. I have no idea how to do it, but it has to start with the families getting the kids involved.I am 57 and can't imagine not being on or having a motorcycle, my passion has been with me since 15 and hasn't waned.American kids would rather ride a motorcycle on a screen than the real thing.
I believe it was the Coopersburg Pa EUROSPORTS shop that was formerly associated with Martin Motorsports that closed or was bought out. As I noted above, this is the risk we take in owning esoteric bikes. I think the game here should be that we find independent individuals that were associated with these shops to work on these bikes and then, for anything serious, drive to the formal dealer. There are not many options. The motorcycle market is horrible and this is what you're going to get on bikes that the dealers can't make money on.
 

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I believe it was the Coopersburg Pa EUROSPORTS shop that was formerly associated with Martin Motorsports that closed or was bought out. As I noted above, this is the risk we take in owning esoteric bikes. I think the game here should be that we find independent individuals that were associated with these shops to work on these bikes and then, for anything serious, drive to the formal dealer. There are not many options. The motorcycle market is horrible and this is what you're going to get on bikes that the dealers can't make money on.

Are motorcycle sales that bad in USA?



In the EU(from the ACEM website):


Motorcycle registrations in the EU up by 8.2% during the first nine months of 2018


Registrations of motorcycles in the EU reached 830,694 units during the first 9 months of 2018, according to the latest estimation of the European Association of Motorcycle Manufacturers (ACEM). This represents an increase of 8.2% compared to the same period of 2017. With 186,487 units (a 5.1% increase on a year-on-year basis) Italy remains the largest European motorcycle market, followed by France (146,276 motorcycles, +10%), Germany (140,628 motorcycles, +11.1%), Spain (113,650 motorcycles, +8.0%) and the UK (83,155 motorcycles, +3.7%).
Motorcycle registrations increased in all EU countries, with the exception of Poland, where they went down by 2.3%.
 

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I believe it was the Coopersburg Pa EUROSPORTS shop that was formerly associated with Martin Motorsports that closed or was bought out. As I noted above, this is the risk we take in owning esoteric bikes. I think the game here should be that we find independent individuals that were associated with these shops to work on these bikes and then, for anything serious, drive to the formal dealer. There are not many options. The motorcycle market is horrible and this is what you're going to get on bikes that the dealers can't make money on.

Just found this article:


Motorcycle Sales Patterns Explained | The Sky is Not Falling

https://ultimatemotorcycling.com/2018/02/12/motorcycle-sales-patterns-explained-sky-not-falling/
 

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All,

I just got an email from Brian Kinnear at Italian Superbikes here in Houston, TX USA. They shut down today, closed doors. I bought a new Guzzi from them 2 years ago and new Brutale RR Dragster in August. Now what? Anyone have any idea where I can get maintenance on these bikes, or warranty work? It sucks. Best I know, the nearest dealer is Austin, TX.
I have a mind to just sell both bikes and buy a japanese bike from one of the Houston dealers.

Crap. I am just gutted.

Advice?

Why the panic? Whats the problem? Get to the next dealership, motivation for a little adventure if it is one or two days away.
 

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Just found this article:


Motorcycle Sales Patterns Explained | The Sky is Not Falling

https://ultimatemotorcycling.com/2018/02/12/motorcycle-sales-patterns-explained-sky-not-falling/
I would venture a guess that most of the 1999-2009 spike was all the middle aged guys who bought Harley's because it was the thing to have. I have friends who bought one, kept it several years, and sold it, never to ride a motorcycle again. Similar to how the golf industry in US had a huge spike from late 80's to late 90's - it was the thing to do - join a country club and learn to play golf. I wonder what the non-Harley sales graph would look like from 1990-2016.
 

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I would venture a guess that most of the 1999-2009 spike was all the middle aged guys who bought Harley's because it was the thing to have. I have friends who bought one, kept it several years, and sold it, never to ride a motorcycle again. Similar to how the golf industry in US had a huge spike from late 80's to late 90's - it was the thing to do - join a country club and learn to play golf. I wonder what the non-Harley sales graph would look like from 1990-2016.

Interesting. If what you say is true, then it was really a bubble (the article author also suggests that).
In the EU with a population of around 513 million, 2018 closed above 1 million units(not including mopeds/scooters), I don't know the exact number.
If the USA number is around half a mil, well it's not bad is it?
 

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I would venture a guess that most of the 1999-2009 spike was all the middle aged guys who bought Harley's because it was the thing to have. . .
Ambitious call. Based on a mean average, that would equate to in excess of 500,000 Harley sales, in each of those spiked years.

I have no familiarity with the USA market though, but that would seem unrealistic, especially if weighing in the prospect of even half of those purchasers having to obtain licences:wink2:
 
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