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Turismo Veloce 800 2019, DR-Z400SM, VanVan RV125
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't like looking after chains, so I've decided to install an oiler, and reading around here, I opted for the Tutoro, for all the reasons @RSTman mentioned in his post on the Tutoro:

No electrical or vacuum connections. Only works when the bike is moving, very simple to adjust the flow. Better and cheaper than a Scott oiler, not better than a Pro-oiler but a lot cheaper and simpler to install.
I've basically done the same installation as he did, so I thought I'd post some pictures of how the installation worked out. But the pics come with a warning: there is mud on the bike. If you're of a sensitive disposition, you might prefer to stop reading and spare yourself the sight of a dirty MV. 馃槺

First, the reservoir, which easily goes on using a few of the bits found in the basic Tutoro kit:

20210327_181010.jpg

The reservoir is mounted on the right hand side, on the brake fluid reservoir mounting point.

20210327_180859.jpg

It can be fitted using a few bits from the basic Tutor kit.

Next, the nozzle and tube is mounted on the sprocket guard.
20210501_150701.jpg

Three holes drilled into the guard are used to place three clip ties that hold the nozzle securely against the sprocket.

And then I fed the feed tube along the underneath of the swing arm, around the front of the shock, and up to the reservoir.

20210501_150956.jpg

Here's the underside of the swing arm. A couple of sticky hooks hold the tube in place.

20210501_150840.jpg

Clip-tie to the cables and then through the cable channel that's directly in front of the shock

20210501_150530.jpg

And over to the right hand side of the bike, where it meets the reservoir.

Not had time to try it out on the road yet (or wash the mud off). But should get out some time this week and check it's working.
 

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Nice install and that's a pretty good location for mounting the reservoir too. I do wonder though if you could have gotten away with running that tube under the plastic cover that holds all your rear indicator lights for your plate?? There is more room in that little passage way than I thought there was. Maybe you could get away with routing it under there? Just a thought. Also i wonder about the placement of the nozel not being centrally located on the chain and only lubricating the right o-rings. Those are things I was thinking about but I have never installed one. Good job though I think that will save you allot of time.

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Here is the thing about chain oilers....

Modern o-ring chains do not benefit from them.
They are a throw back to the days when chains needed frequent lubrication because the load bearing internal roller surfaces were not sealed.

With a modern chain, the o-rings seal the grease inside the rollers...and prevent entry from anything external ...like the chain oiler is providing. What the chain oiler does is provide a medium to attract more dirt and grime on the outside of the chain....and make a mess on the wheel and bike.

Proper modern chain maintenance involves cleaning the grit and grime off the chain periodically and then applying something to discourage rust. That product may also provide a little external lubricant to the o-rings to help keep them from drying on the outer surface.

Once in a while, clean your chain with a solvent of some sort (kerosene, mineral spirits, etc) and a brush. Then give it a nice spray with light oil (even WD40) and wipe it off. Ride on.
 

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Here is the thing about chain oilers....

Modern o-ring chains do not benefit from them.
They are a throw back to the days when chains needed frequent lubrication because the load bearing internal roller surfaces were not sealed.

With a modern chain, the o-rings seal the grease inside the rollers...and prevent entry from anything external ...like the chain oiler is providing. What the chain oiler does is provide a medium to attract more dirt and grime on the outside of the chain....and make a mess on the wheel and bike.

Proper modern chain maintenance involves cleaning the grit and grime off the chain periodically and then applying something to discourage rust. That product may also provide a little external lubricant to the o-rings to help keep them from drying on the outer surface.

Once in a while, clean your chain with a solvent of some sort (kerosene, mineral spirits, etc) and a brush. Then give it a nice spray with light oil (even WD40) and wipe it off. Ride on.
Now you've gone and done it... 馃嵖馃嵖馃嵖
 

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I'm in the boat of over lubricating my chain.... it just sort of seems like neglect to me if I don't clean it and lubricate it after every time I ride. I'm sure it's probably Overkill but it makes me feel better.

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I'm in the boat of over lubricating my chain.... it just sort of seems like neglect to me if I don't clean it and lubricate it after every time I ride. I'm sure it's probably Overkill but it makes me feel better.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
After riding a Buell for 12 years, it's kind of fun to have something to do to the moto between rides.
 

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Here is the thing about chain oilers....

Modern o-ring chains do not benefit from them.
They are a throw back to the days when chains needed frequent lubrication because the load bearing internal roller surfaces were not sealed.

With a modern chain, the o-rings seal the grease inside the rollers...and prevent entry from anything external ...like the chain oiler is providing. What the chain oiler does is provide a medium to attract more dirt and grime on the outside of the chain....and make a mess on the wheel and bike.

Proper modern chain maintenance involves cleaning the grit and grime off the chain periodically and then applying something to discourage rust. That product may also provide a little external lubricant to the o-rings to help keep them from drying on the outer surface.

Once in a while, clean your chain with a solvent of some sort (kerosene, mineral spirits, etc) and a brush. Then give it a nice spray with light oil (even WD40) and wipe it off. Ride on.
Absolutely agree- I鈥檝e always thought chain oilers were an overkill solution for a problem that doesn鈥檛 exist.

i just clean the chain regularly (takes about 5 minutes), and use chain wax - nice and light without attracting dirt and it makes the chain easy to clean the next time.

馃憣
 

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i just clean the chain regularly (takes about 5 minutes), and use chain wax - nice and light without attracting dirt and it makes the chain easy to clean the next time.
chain wax added info -- use lightly or suffer cleanup from overspray. --as in the least amount followed by an immediate wipe-off of excess. Such sticky stuff when icky thick.
 
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