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Discussion Starter #1
When I picked up my Dragster RR, I was lucky enough to go out on the new Brutale 1000RR.
I wasn't expecting it so I did not have my vlogging gear unfortunately.
Happy to answer any questions.

It is in the following Brutale vs Rush video.

 
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Discussion Starter #3
I have been out on the Streetfighter V4S.

The Ducati is more comfortable and makes a better noise, stock, in the low to mid range. A great bike, perhaps a little unevenful until you hit the higher revs. My main problem with it is that is does not feel 'special'. They should have built a ground-up bespoke naked bike. I am not massively turned on by the looks either, too much alloy.

The MV is better looking. The details are excellent as usual. The back end and exhaust setup is amazing. The new TFT is less cluttered than the rest. Gear change and fueling are superb. It is a very stretched forward and low position which, for me, and others may be an ergonomic problem. As you can see in the short clip of me riding it away, I look like I am on a 1960s racer with severe clip ons.

Acceleration is brutal on both when you get to 6k to 8k. You wouldn;t come close to whacking full throttle on, even with the tech on as it is so ridiculous.

Due to the gearing I would say the MV is more 'fun' and that may still seal it for me.
 
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I can't thank you enough for your input. I have a 2020 Streetfighter. I do like it but the seating position is kind of awkward for me. Are you over thy bars, not really, but you're not upright either. The way I count it up, by the time you add all the carbon fiber to the Ducati you're a fair amount closer to the MV. Did you notice a difference between the V4 and I4? I'll never utilize the full potential of either bike.
Thanks for the help and the video.

John
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I don't think anybody would utlise the full power of the bikes. You'd need the long straight at Le Mans or the Nurburgring but way before you get to 180MPH you would have been blown off the back :)

I can't say I noticed a difference between inline and the V configuration. Both have more character than Honda's 1000 engine though not as smooth. For these bikes, raw is better anyway.

My Streetfighter review goes up next week. Certainly, if you added a few bits and the exhaust option you hit the price of the 1000RR but neither bike needs the can as they sound so bloody good stock, even with the compliance rules - both did a great job - they both basically outpowered the restrictions!
 

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Hi, Hopefully you can help. I am lucky enough to have a six month old Dragster RR SC in the black and red. To be honest I don't like the ride, suspension set up etc even after having it set up properly, to the point im not enjoying the ride. I can with a bit of saving lucky enough to get a 1000rr because I have been offered nearly all my money back in PX. What I don't want to do is have the same trouble with the suspension or ride on the RR. The SC exhaust is very noisy as well so is the 1000RR quiter?, Im not a fast rider so top speed doesn't interest me. I just want a bike that handles well and is enjoyable to ride. Any views on this please?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hi, Hopefully you can help. I am lucky enough to have a six month old Dragster RR SC in the black and red. To be honest I don't like the ride, suspension set up etc even after having it set up properly, to the point im not enjoying the ride. I can with a bit of saving lucky enough to get a 1000rr because I have been offered nearly all my money back in PX. What I don't want to do is have the same trouble with the suspension or ride on the RR. The SC exhaust is very noisy as well so is the 1000RR quiter?, Im not a fast rider so top speed doesn't interest me. I just want a bike that handles well and is enjoyable to ride. Any views on this please?
Interesting. I have to be honest - I much much prefer the 3cyl Brutale/Dragster over the 1000RR.
Lighter, fun, flickable and a lot more useable BUT you do have to have the suspension set up right. Strange that yours failed you but there is a limit to the what the standard suspension can move to so you may have busted that limit.
I;d still love the 1000RR of course (love the Rush).

You will find the 1000RR more comfy seat wise but you are hunched over more which, for me and my back, is not good.
The suspension is MUCH better than the 800cc bikes - night and day - and they are top notch and fully adjustable so overall you may find it a much more suitable bike.

The standard exhaust on the 1000RR is not as loud as you'd think and the engine is smoother so you might prefer it actually.

Besides cost, the main thing for me, between the two (other than ergonomics) is that the 800cc bikes are a lot more fun. They are really perky in the low end and finding the top end is a delight. The 1000rr, frustratingly, feels almost sluggish down below (like a 90s Turbo car) but then, my god, it goes ballistic.

This might also suit you as you can potter round, in any mode, and never feel the bike is too much for you and you can actually take it easy without trying. This is why I like my Fireblade for the road. It is like a docile old bike in the low revs and easy to ride but the devil is waiting.

If you are looking at other brands then I would suggest the V4S is not for you.
The new Super Duke R is the best bike of the lot if you can live with the looks.
The Tuono Factory is still a sublime weapon.
The Z H2 is super comfy and I was very pleasantly surprised. It has Tesla like acceleration when you 'floor' it.
 

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Thank you for the reply, you most certainly have answered some issues I have with the bikes. I do feel very luck to have the choice but I feel a bit short changed with the Dragster and I think I will never be quite be happy with it. Can I ask why the V4S is not a good idea? I don't like the look of one but just wondering why?
Many thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Can I ask why the V4S is not a good idea?
It is a fabulous bike, of course. BUT....
  • Ducati really missed a trick by not making it more 'fun' They should have gone the Super Duke R route and not just turned it into a sit-up Panigale.
  • The looks - they could have done better
  • By the time you take away that Euro 5 compliant exhaust you are looking at 1000RR money.
  • I have already seen 10 of them so, for the exclusivity alone, I would take the 1000RR.
  • I suspect you will not like the delivery of the power
I would suggest getting out on all these bikes to make your own mind up. It comes down to use a lot.
If you are going on thr track, for example, then the Ducati will come into play more.
 
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Discussion Starter #12
Pound for pound, the Tuono Factory and new Super Duke R are the better buys. More fun, easier to ride.
Better than my beloved Dragster RR as well - I have to concede.

Still, that is not what it is always about. The 100RR has the looks, rarity and I would still prefer it over the Aprilia and KTM. The trouble is justifying the huge leap in cost over those two superb bikes.
 

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Thank you for that sorting. I went from F4 to Tuono and since the Brutale 1000RR came out, the desire to return to MV is definitely there. I know, the F4 is a superbike and the Tuono a kind of in between, but apart from that MV feeling of owning something really special, the Tuono is just so much better in every aspect of riding. There is always torque (the SDR1290 is of course in another league in that regard), but still enough high rev spectacle.

What is still detering me the most from going back to MV is that most of the stuff that makes the Brutale 1000RR so expensive is completely irrelevant for a mediocre skilled road rider like myself (like the titanium conrods), while some nice stuff like real semiactive suspension and cornering ABS are not available yet. I am still hoping for a EURO5 update, possibly with a Brutale 1000R derivate that deploys the "base" F4 engine that was not really weak with its 196HP. Or that they bumb the displacement like all the others have already done.
 

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Having both a 16 Tuono Factory and the Brutale Oro I have to say the MV is by far the better bike riden back to back.
I'm at the point where I going to have the Tuono suspension set up again to see if it will change things but I always seem to take the Brutale over the Tuono.
 

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Thanks for that back to back impression.

I have not ridden the 2016 Tuono, but that one should have the "best" of the Tuono engines as it is not hampered by Euro4. I only have the comparison between the F4 Euro3 and the Tuono Euro4, and to me the F4 was (not surprisingly) running smother very down below, but as of 4-5k revs, the Tuono feels like a Muscle car V8 competing with a turbo. But that might have changed with the new engine and the Brutale. I remember when I purchased the F4 it was rather snatchy and then after two mapping updates released by MV releases, it suddenly felt like a manageable bike. Might be that they again found some tricks how to improve the engine.

In terms of the suspension and brakes, Aprilia have issued two considerable updates since your model. Since the 2017 models the brakes got updated to 330mm M50 brakes with cornering ABS, which work notably better than the 320mm M4.32 with the conventional ABS that were on my F4 (not sure if these are the same that were used on the Tuono in 2016) and since 2019 there is the semi active suspension on the Tuono (which is essentially the same stuff that is used in the Brutale).

When I bought my Tuono, I test rode the 2018 model with the convential suspension (which felt superior to my F4's Marzocci setup), but bought the 2019 due to non-availability of the 2018 model. And I have to say that just that makes a very notable difference, even for a somewhat slower rider like me. It simply feels plush and planted at the same time, whereas the convential Öhlins is superb and maybe even quicker on the race track with the right pilot, but on normal, changing roads I would never want to miss that semi active Öhlins.
 
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