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I loaded the battery last time about two months ago. After that I have turned on the engine around 2-3 times. Today I was about to take a ride, but the engine didn't start. :wtf:

It sounded like the battery was empty. How many times can I turn on the engine by using the battery without any loading?

After every start the engine has run around minute or so, so it has not loaded the battery at all.

I have Yuasa battery that is rather new.
 

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since you idled a bit after turn on, the drain on battery from starts is near or less than the drain on your battery from simply letting it sit, in my opinion. The combination of draining your battery from starting and letting it sit for 2 months did it. You should put a maintainer on the battery if you are letting it sit for two months. At this point, charge it back up and get going. If you let your battery deplete two, three or more times like you just did, then the battery will be toast and you'll have to get a new one. Hope this helps.
 

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Thanks! I will load the battery tomorrow and after that I will tell you what happened.

Here in Finland you just can't drive every day - and I am too lazy to take it off and load every time. :)
 

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What would help is if people understood electrical theory.

Starting draw on a battery is huge. Idling you system does not recharge the bike at all.
Your voltage regulator is not really functioning until higher RPM because the alternator does not reach peak output until higher RPM.

In effect, what you are doing is draining the electrical potential (voltage) stored in your battery and expecting the chemical reaction of lead and electrolyte to replenish that voltage thereby depleting your battery's chemical energy and destroying it quickly.

A charger, or your bike's charging system, reverses the chemical reaction and restores energy to your battery and lengthens the life of the limited chemicals stored in that little black box.
 

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Chuck is spot-on.I don't think charging starts happening until about 1,600rpm.Also the extra fuel delivered on cold starts really loads up the motor which doesn't help either.Just keep the battery tender on until you are ready to ride the machine.
 

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And if you do replace your battery, don`t make the ever so common mistake of hooking it up backwards.
 

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Wtf?

BULLSHIT

put a real meter on the POS

my '08 910R shows 14.59V DC at 1,200 rpm, on a battery that reads 12.4 V DC

every vehicle I ever had or worked on charges at idle

what your lights dim at idle????????
 

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I disagree and this can be verified if u measure output of the electricals with engine running. It will be at or near 13.8v. My duc have voltage display and confirms this. At low rpm the current is lowest but it is still charging the battery or else the voltage would dip to below battery voltage as the running bike needs current when running and this is provided by the generator, the balance provided to battery at idle keeping voltage constant at charging voltage.
What would help is if people understood electrical theory.

Starting draw on a battery is huge. Idling you system does not recharge the bike at all.
Your voltage regulator is not really functioning until higher RPM because the alternator does not reach peak output until higher RPM.

In effect, what you are doing is draining the electrical potential (voltage) stored in your battery and expecting the chemical reaction of lead and electrolyte to replenish that voltage thereby depleting your battery's chemical energy and destroying it quickly.

A charger, or your bike's charging system, reverses the chemical reaction and restores energy to your battery and lengthens the life of the limited chemicals stored in that little black box.
 

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The battery only has a couple of amp hours reserve before damaging battery. You can start stop the bike tens of times with no worries on a charged healthy battery. Battery discharges on its own within months to damaging state and must be kept on maintainer. Self discharge. Look it up for lead acid battery chemistry
 

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I loaded the battery last time about two months ago. After that I have turned on the engine around 2-3 times. Today I was about to take a ride, but the engine didn't start. :wtf:

It sounded like the battery was empty. How many times can I turn on the engine by using the battery without any loading?

After every start the engine has run around minute or so, so it has not loaded the battery at all.

I have Yuasa battery that is rather new.
: )

I give all my bikes a full charge once a month Tuomas..In the winter :freezing: if I am away from home they have to wait an extra month but the batteries aren't being used so they have to be patient..:)

I get long service from my batteries.

I don't worry about starting the bike when it is in storage. I also believe that this builds up moisture/sludge in the oil.

Have you ever taken a sump off a bike engine and seen the "coffee" in the bottom ..Yuk

Charge it up Tuomas ..There must be an amp hour output from the alternator at tickover and then a comparison with amp hour draw from the battery /time when cranking.. I'd still charge my battery up once a month..

atb

Joe
 

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BULLSHIT

put a real meter on the POS

my '08 910R shows 14.59V DC at 1,200 rpm, on a battery that reads 12.4 V DC

every vehicle I ever had or worked on charges at idle

what your lights dim at idle????????
No, they brighten off idle...you just aren't watching then.:smoking:

Conversely, yes they dim slightly at idle. Try it in a dark garage...and read your engine manual.
 

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Thanks! I will load the battery tomorrow and after that I will tell you what happened.

Here in Finland you just can't drive every day - and I am too lazy to take it off and load every time. :)
I have the same battery as you, had it 2 yrs or so, no problems.
Is your bike near enough to an electric socket, even by a simple extension lead?
I have fitted a short charge lead direct to my battery. This way it is very easy for me to plug my trickle charger in. The lead is permanently fitted to the battery, came with the decent quality charger. When I unplug it I just tuck the short lead back into the bike neatly out of the way. The whole process takes just seconds. The short lead permanently fitted to the battery even has a rubber cap fitted, so when not in use it is sealed from moisture.

This is what I have: http://www.amazon.co.uk/CTEK-Motorcycle-Battery-Care-Monitoring/dp/B00C984ZC0/ref=sr_1_12?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1404040766&sr=1-12&keywords=CTEK+motorcycle+battery+charger It is a gentle 6 stage charger.

Or this one is even better: http://www.amazon.co.uk/CTEK-Functional-7-stage-battery-charger/dp/B00E5VS58Y/ref=pd_sim_sbs_auto_2?ie=UTF8&refRID=0X022J52SD40YY2H8RRW

As the bike has an alarm fitted, and I often let the fans run for a while after I stop(I have had heat fairing damage) I nearly always leave my bike on trickle charge.
Word of warning, I would suggest you unplug the charger when starting the bike. I damaged my previous charger when I revved the engine with the charger still plugged in.
 

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350 W at 5000 r.p.m. for latest bike is the generator spec. The moment the generator is on it will generate energy. If that energy is not enough to power the bike and charge the battery it would not be able to overcome the lowest energy provision of the battery which is around 12V. P=current x voltage. Voltage = Power / Current. Current is inversely proportional to voltage. As the current draw increases, then the voltage would go down to even below the battery static voltage, but this does not happen, because the generator is able to supply enough Power even at idle to maintain the charge voltage of 13.8 or higher. The battery gets charged even at idle, albeit at a lower rate is the conclusion. Now if the battery was exceptionally depleted, the generator may not be able to supply the hungry battery which is currently at well below 12volts. In this case I imagine the lights would dim and other electric dependent equipment on the bike would have to sacrifice. This could mean rough running, dim lights, and such. Take the extreme of an infinitely hungry battery, in this case the generator would not keep up, the bike would shutdown as the dead battery sinks all that the generator can supply, leaving nothing left for the bike's electricals. The generator must be designed with enough capacity at idle to work with the battery in all battery charge demand conditions to maintain the minimum operating voltage of the bike's electricals. That minimum operating voltage for the electricals I do not know but can guess that it would be no less than ~10.5 volts. Some vehicle electricals/ electronics engineer would know for sure, for that I am not although related...
Long story short, if you want your generator to last, then make sure you have a good quality and condition battery.
 

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Exactly

***MVBERTI have the same battery as you, had it 2 yrs or so, no problems.
Is your bike near enough to an electric socket, even by a simple extension lead?
I have fitted a short charge lead direct to my battery. This way it is very easy for me to plug my trickle charger in. The lead is permanently fitted to the battery, came with the decent quality charger. When I unplug it I just tuck the short lead back into the bike neatly out of the way. The whole process takes just seconds. The short lead permanently fitted to the battery even has a rubber cap fitted, so when not in use it is sealed from moisture.

As the bike has an alarm fitted, and I often let the fans run for a while after I stop(I have had heat fairing damage) I nearly always leave my bike on trickle charge.***



Always on the charger, simple
 

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read the manual????
why? I know what system voltage should be....my Mother's Lexus, my Sister's and my friend Jackie's Honda Elements all EAT batteries......charging voltage???? 13.6-13.7 V

how about the 7 page explanation of how the voltage regulator works????

brilliant:stickpoke

between 1,200 and ~8-,000 my system voltage reads the same +- ~0.02 V measured with a Fluke 87 Mk lll

I have never used a trickle charger ever!

my vehicles work or get fixed!
 

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True Noel, simply because you, like I, maintain your equipment. Most people don't. Shelf losses on a battery that is not used will destroy it if not trickle charged. Your battery stays in good condition because you use your machine frequently.
 

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I usually hook the battery tender on once a week when not riding for long periods of time. I wait till the light turns green and then unplug for a week. I also usually plug in tender the night before I ride it as well. Been doing this for 2 years now on the same battery. I don't know if cycling it like this helps battery life and charge, but it has worked for me. Previous owner had the tender on constantly for a few months out of the year (snow) on the same battery and it would not hold a charge to long after unplugging to ride it. After cycling the battery tender a few times as described, battery has been great to me.
 

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I never charged my cars either and they would sit for months at a time

My R1150GS is hard on batteries too......low charging voltage:wtf:
 
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