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Discussion Starter #1
Everyone,

I unfortunately have what is possibly the worst dealer experience anywhere.

I wanted to buy a 748 or 996 and after a long search, I came across what looked like a pristine 2001 748S. The bike was being sold by Unique Superbikes (Unique SBK) in Miami, so after some negotiating, I made the purchase.
The disclosed odometer reading was 14167 miles, but when I took the bike home, After a long ride, I noticed the odometer had not changed. I called the dealer and tried to get some resolution. What is even worse, the engine failed the next morning. Leo, the owner would not even consider taking the bike back and offered to buy the bike back minus the cost to repair it!
I finally trailered the bike to a reputable Ducati mechanic, had it inspected and was told that the bike was likely a lemon when I bought it, and that the engine had potentially many more miles than the disclosed number.
A new odometer cable, coolant reservoir and complete engine reduild later, all at a cost of over $4000 plus the purchase price of $5826 and not only did the dealer not help, but actually sent my registration C.O.D. For and additional $134!
His "way of helping" was to offer me a discount on the labor, if I took the bike over to his shop, which at this point was not an option for me, since the trust was not there any longer.

Yep...getting a lawyer is going to cost me even more, but I just cannot let this guy get away with. Beware, beware!
 

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Sorry to hear mate

My honest opinion of coarse is that you should have taken the bike back the next day and gone straight for legal action, not spend more of your money first and then hope you get it back.
There is no way that was a legal and binding transaction. And a Ducati at that too :jsm:
 

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You might be able to hold him accountable for selling you a bike with incorrect mileage. Like Donsy stated. I would of not fixed it until it was all settled with the original dealer.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
My honest opinion of coarse is that you should have taken the bike back the next day and gone straight for legal action, not spend more of your money first and then hope you get it back.
There is no way that was a legal and binding transaction. And a Ducati at that too :jsm:
Donsy, that was the first thing I tried, but he would not take the bike back.
 

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Bastard

That is bad news mate, I know in the US there is certain Lemon laws and I know like us over here there is a thing such as Value for money, where the use of a product is determined by the price, ie, if you pay for something then you should be able to use it for something near the value of what you paid for it.
But in your case this sounds even worse, I can't believe he would not take it back, what went wrong on the bike, I will put money on it that he knew there was something wrong. It's not like you bought a off-road vehicle, there would have to be some warranty involved?
 

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Lemon Law only applies to new vehicles under factory warranty, but there are much more stringent laws regarding misrepresentation of mileage ....good case there but will require expert witness testimony from the tech that fixed the odometer. Bad scene all around! I feel for you!
 

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This is a six foot put with no breaks. Unless he disclosed that the odometer was not working and that the indicated milage might not be correct, a letter from a lawyer advising him of the shit storm of legal and regulatory action heading his way should change his mind.
 

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Not sure what the laws in the States are but to get the bike registered it would have to pass a roadworthy. If the speedo is faulty, then how did it get the roadworthy?

In Australia, a motorvehicle trader must be registered/licenced. A friend purchased a car to find she needed new brake pads withing 10,000kms. Taking it back to the dealer he was not very forthcoming with assistance until she said she would go to the licencing authorities with the tale of the dealer selling a vehicle which didn't meet the legal requirements for registration (brake pads must be no less than 50% worn or similar) at which point the brakes were 'instantly' fixed at no cost. Is there are similar authority where you are?

Finally, many many years ago, a 'yank tank' (remember I live in Aus.) was purchased and proved to be a total lemon. After repeated tries to get the vehicle repaired and then replaced the owner had a sign writer write the problems and responses all over the car and then legally parked it outside the dealers. The dealer tried to have the vehicle removed but couldn't and then offered the owner a new vehicle to replace his lemon. The owner politely declined and continued parking the car outside the dealers with the obvious result of effecting the dealers trade. Naurally, the vehicle and the dealer received media attention which obviously didn't help with sales. just a thought.

anyhow, good luck with whtever course of action you take.
 

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Everyone,

I unfortunately have what is possibly the worst dealer experience anywhere.

I wanted to buy a 748 or 996 and after a long search, I came across what looked like a pristine 2001 748S. The bike was being sold by Unique Superbikes (Unique SBK) in Miami, so after some negotiating, I made the purchase.
The disclosed odometer reading was 14167 miles, but when I took the bike home, After a long ride, I noticed the odometer had not changed. I called the dealer and tried to get some resolution. What is even worse, the engine failed the next morning. Leo, the owner would not even consider taking the bike back and offered to buy the bike back minus the cost to repair it!
I finally trailered the bike to a reputable Ducati mechanic, had it inspected and was told that the bike was likely a lemon when I bought it, and that the engine had potentially many more miles than the disclosed number.
A new odometer cable, coolant reservoir and complete engine reduild later, all at a cost of over $4000 plus the purchase price of $5826 and not only did the dealer not help, but actually sent my registration C.O.D. For and additional $134!
His "way of helping" was to offer me a discount on the labor, if I took the bike over to his shop, which at this point was not an option for me, since the trust was not there any longer.

Yep...getting a lawyer is going to cost me even more, but I just cannot let this guy get away with. Beware, beware!

He should be brought to book Marco.

I bought a beautiful Honda 750 four a few years back. It was immaculate...looked brand new...The seller knew it had a engine problem...He didn't tell me...

Two weeks after buying it I was fitting a replacement engine..

It really is a case of buyer beware...

I don't know what the legalities are in your neck of the woods but this is your next task..to get best advice on where you stand. Hopefully you will be able to get reasonable compensation.

Personally after my experience I would go right back to the seller as soon as the problem became apparent and demand my money back as the bike is not fit for purpose ...If it ever happens to me again that is what I shall do.

Best of luck
joe

It's a case of buyer beware.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
That is bad news mate, I know in the US there is certain Lemon laws and I know like us over here there is a thing such as Value for money, where the use of a product is determined by the price, ie, if you pay for something then you should be able to use it for something near the value of what you paid for it.
But in your case this sounds even worse, I can't believe he would not take it back, what went wrong on the bike, I will put money on it that he knew there was something wrong. It's not like you bought a off-road vehicle, there would have to be some warranty involved?
Thanks Dons, live and learn.
The bike turned out to have stripped connecting rod bearings, which were caused by a crankshaft out of balance and bent rods. I took it to Chris Boy here in Florida, who by far is the best Ducati/MV/Aprilia mechanic in the region, and also races sponsored by Ducati. He thinks the bike was damaged long before I bought it.
I did do a compression check and it was fine, I also tested the bike, but at slow speeds and only for a few minutes. I figured that if I was buying from an authorized dealer, I would be safe.
The bike is beautiful, and I had been looking for one for a while. I will just spend the money to make it road worthy, and go after the dealer even if I don't get a cent out of him. People like him should not be in business.
Joe, taking the bike right back to him and getting my money was the very first thing I tried, but the guy would not accept.
 

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That is a beautiful 748s...but, it is far from original. I have a 1998 748s that I bought in immaculate condition with around 24k on the clock....with a second motor(a 2000 with 4000 miles) all for $5200.00. This bike has seen duty from several rider since and it's great.
 

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I'd go after the dealer....
 

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This is a six foot put with no breaks. Unless he disclosed that the odometer was not working and that the indicated milage might not be correct, a letter from a lawyer advising him of the shit storm of legal and regulatory action heading his way should change his mind.

If you have a signed odometer statement validating the mileage as correct, explain that you are returning the bike for a full refund. Don't bother with a lawyer yet.....
 

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Transfer of Title Says What

In California and Texas, you have to write down the odometer mileage. In addition, there is a box that has to be checked if the mileage is not correct or been changed.

This is your main standing point. And as far as them not taking it back - BS!
1) You take it there, hand them a letter with your justification, and leave.
2) Then, you follow up with the same letter sending it notarized.
3) Also, get in contact with Ducati and fill them in on the details.
4) Document, document document every conversation you've had and who (with date) you spoke to.
5) Document from the dealer who believes the bike was already damaged.

Now the questions:

1) What did they say when you pointed out the odometer was not working.

More to come.
 

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consumer protection agency? ( bureau) that's a good way to stick it to the dealer. Its federal, thus they like to mess with people.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
In California and Texas, you have to write down the odometer mileage. In addition, there is a box that has to be checked if the mileage is not correct or been changed.

This is your main standing point. And as far as them not taking it back - BS!
1) You take it there, hand them a letter with your justification, and leave.
2) Then, you follow up with the same letter sending it notarized.
3) Also, get in contact with Ducati and fill them in on the details.
4) Document, document document every conversation you've had and who (with date) you spoke to.
5) Document from the dealer who believes the bike was already damaged.

Now the questions:

1) What did they say when you pointed out the odometer was not working.

More to come.
He said he was not aware and to have the bike checked by his mechanic. I never got there, because the engine failed the next time i tried to ride the bike.
I do have the form in which he states the mileage as actual. And I already have someone on it at the State Attorney's level. Thanks for the advise!


Fun stuff, huh!?
 
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